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Fixed typos.

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commit d4a8addedd95eb55e592f6f3cd57ad9a5559827f 1 parent cbcbe27
@Util Util authored
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2  outline.pod
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ Containers; Perl's built-in data types.
L<scalars> *
Should be simple, provided that the reference part stays put. Should mention
-numerification/stringification, magical auto-increment.
+numification/stringification, magical auto-increment.
=head3 Arrays
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2  sections/blessed_references.pod
@@ -248,7 +248,7 @@ difference is that method resolution will visit all children of a parent before
visiting the parent.
While other, better techniques often allow you to avoid multiple inheritance
-(sich as L<roles> and Moose method modifiers), the C<mro> pragma can help avoid
+(such as L<roles> and Moose method modifiers), the C<mro> pragma can help avoid
surprising behavior with method dispatch. Enable it in your class with:
=begin programlisting
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2  sections/control_flow.pod
@@ -1027,7 +1027,7 @@ C<log_and_greet_person()> and immediately returning I<from>
C<log_and_greet_person()>. Returning directly from C<greet_person()> to the
caller of C<log_and_greet_person()> is a tailcall optimization.
-Unfortuately, Perl 5 cannot perform this optimization automatically.
+Unfortunately, Perl 5 cannot perform this optimization automatically.
Fortunately, you can perform it manually.
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2  sections/functions.pod
@@ -281,7 +281,7 @@ flattening and slurping when passing aggregate parameters.
X<parameter aliasing>
X<functions; aliasing parameters>
-One remanining feature of C<@_> can be surprising (though useful): it contains
+One remaining feature of C<@_> can be surprising (though useful): it contains
aliases to the passed-in parameters, at least until you unpack C<@_> into its
own variables. This behavior is easiest to demonstrate with an example:
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4 sections/hashes.pod
@@ -147,7 +147,7 @@ automatically according to the same rules as fat commas:
=begin programlisting
- # autoquoted
+ # auto-quoted
my $address = $addresses{Victor};
# needs quoting; not a valid bareword
@@ -422,7 +422,7 @@ themselves evaluate to false in a boolean context.
nok( %empty, 'empty hash should evaluate to false' );
my %false_key = ( 0 => 'true value' );
- ok( %false_key, 'hash containing false key should evalute to true' );
+ ok( %false_key, 'hash containing false key should evaluate to true' );
my %false_value = ( 'true key' => 0 );
ok( %false_value, 'hash containing false value should evaluate to true' );
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4 sections/indirect_objects.pod
@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ filehandles).
=begin sidebar
-For supreme paranoia, you may disamgibuate class method calls further by
+For supreme paranoia, you may disambiguate class method calls further by
appending C<::> to the end of class names, such as C<< CGI::->new() >>. Very
little code does this in practice, however.
@@ -128,4 +128,4 @@ X<indirect>
To identify indirect calls in your code, use the CPAN module
C<Perl::Critic::Policy::Dynamic::NoIndirect> (a plugin for C<Perl::Critic>).
-Toforbid their use at compile time, use the CPAN module C<indirect>.
+To forbid their use at compile time, use the CPAN module C<indirect>.
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4 sections/missing_defaults.pod
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ meant and had to guess at the proper interpretation. Even though Perl often
guesses correctly, disambiguation on your part will ensure that your programs
run correctly.
-The C<warnings> pramga has a lexical effect on the compile-time scope of its
+The C<warnings> pragma has a lexical effect on the compile-time scope of its
use. You may disable some or all warnings with C<no warnings> (within the
smallest possible scope, of course). See C<perldoc perllexwarn> and C<perldoc
warnings> for more details.
@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ C<IO::Handle> for you.
=head4 The C<autodie> Pragma
-Perl 5's default error checking is parsimonius. If you're not careful to check
+Perl 5's default error checking is parsimonious. If you're not careful to check
the return value of every C<open()> call, for example, you could try to read
from a closed filehandle--or worse, lose data as you try to write to one. The C<autodie> pragma changes the default behavior. If you write:
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2  sections/moose.pod
@@ -431,7 +431,7 @@ the object passed in doesn't matter, nor does its I<implementation>. All that
matters is that it supports three methods, C<name()>, C<age()>, and C<diet()>
which take no arguments and each return something which can concatenate in a
string context. Thus you may have a hundred different classes in your code,
-none of which have any obvious relationshp between each other, but if they
+none of which have any obvious relationship between each other, but if they
conform to this expectation of behavior, they will work with this method.
This is an improvement over writing specific functions to extract and display
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2  sections/references.pod
@@ -169,7 +169,7 @@ flatten the array into a list or count the number of elements it contains:
X<references; dereferencing arrow>
X<< -> >>
X<< operators; -> >>
-X<operators; deferencing arrow>
+X<operators; dereferencing arrow>
You may also access individual elements by using the dereferencing arrow:
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2  sections/regular_expressions.pod
@@ -537,7 +537,7 @@ I<zero-width negative look-ahead assertion>:
my $safe_feline = qr/cat(?!astrophe)/;
This construct, C<(?!...)>, matches the phrase C<cat> only if the phrase
-C<atastrophe> does not immediately follow.
+C<astrophe> does not immediately follow.
X<regex assertions; zero-width positive look-ahead>
X<zero-width positive look-ahead assertion>
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2  sections/testing.pod
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ running tests
- prove
- Test::Harness
-comparisions:
+comparisons:
- is
- isa/can
- is_deeply()
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4 sections/values.pod
@@ -170,7 +170,7 @@ X<integers>
X<floating-point values>
Perl also supports numbers, whether integers or floating-point values. They
-support scientific notation as well as binary, octal, and hexidecimal
+support scientific notation as well as binary, octal, and hexadecimal
representations:
=begin programlisting
@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ The emboldened characters are the numeric prefixes for binary, octal, and hex
notation respectively. Be aware that the leading zero always indicates octal
mode; this can occasionally produce unanticipated confusion.
-X<numbers; undercore separator>
+X<numbers; underscore separator>
X<underscore>
For dealing with large numbers, you may use the underscore character (C<_>) to
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