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Fixed cross references.

Z<> tags must have an empty line after them, lest any subsequent X<>
tags make a paragraph. This is a flaw in the PseudoPOD formatter, but
it's easier to fix by convention for now than it is to change in the
formatter. (In other words, it's kind of a limitation of POD.)
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commit 77dbbbfdd7267593d59941486789c5d2eedf4915 1 parent f4bf2e2
@chromatic authored
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4 sections/advanced_oo.pod
@@ -82,8 +82,8 @@ U<http://weblog.raganwald.com/2008/04/is-strictly-equivalent-to.html>.>.
=head2 Subtypes and Coercions
-Z<subtypes>
-Z<coercions>
+Z<subtypes_and_coercions>
+
X<types>
X<subtypes>
X<coercion>
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2  sections/autoload.pod
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ the package global C<$AUTOLOAD> (here, C<main::bake_pie>):
=end programlisting
-Extract the method name with a regular expression (L<regex>):
+Extract the method name with a regular expression (L<chp.regex>):
=begin programlisting
View
2  sections/chapter_06.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
=head0 Regular Expressions and Matching
-Z<regex>
+Z<chp.regex>
X<regular expressions>
X<regex>
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1  sections/closures.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
=head1 Closures
Z<closures>
+
X<functions; higher order>
X<higher order functions>
View
4 sections/coercion.pod
@@ -18,6 +18,7 @@ into a string.
=head2 Boolean Coercion
Z<boolean_coercion>
+
X<coercion; boolean>
X<truthiness>
@@ -34,6 +35,8 @@ to a true value in boolean context.
=head2 String Coercion
+Z<string_coercion>
+
X<coercion; string>
X<stringification>
@@ -54,6 +57,7 @@ individual digits with:
=head2 Numeric Coercion
Z<numeric_coercion>
+
X<coercion; numeric>
X<numification>
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2  sections/control_flow.pod
@@ -244,6 +244,7 @@ between alternative I<variables>, not only values:
=head3 Short Circuiting
Z<short_circuiting>
+
X<short-circuiting>
Perl exhibits I<short-circuiting> behavior when it encounters complex
@@ -1022,6 +1023,7 @@ Adding Spock and Lizard is left as an exercise for the reader.
=head2 Tailcalls
Z<tailcalls>
+
X<tailcalls>
A I<tailcall> occurs when the last expression within a function is a call to
View
1  sections/exceptions.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
=head1 Exceptions
Z<exceptions>
+
X<exceptions>
Good programmers anticipate the unexpected. Files that should exist won't. A
View
2  sections/files.pod
@@ -9,6 +9,7 @@ administrators has produced a language well suited for text processing.
=head2 Input and Output
Z<filehandle>
+
X<filehandles>
X<filehandles; C<STDIN>>
X<filehandles; C<STDERR>>
@@ -308,6 +309,7 @@ As usual, C<autodie> handles these checks for you:
=head3 Special File Handling Variables
Z<file_handling_variables>
+
X<C<$.>>
X<global variables; C<$.>>
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4 sections/functions.pod
@@ -344,6 +344,7 @@ With experimental function signatures, you could write:
=head2 Slurping
Z<parameter_slurping>
+
X<parameters; slurping>
List assignment with an aggregate is always greedy, so assigning to C<%pets>
@@ -491,6 +492,7 @@ Of course, C<strict> is a pragma (L<pragmas>), so it has other effects.
=head1 Reporting Errors
Z<reporting_errors>
+
X<builtins; C<caller>>
Almost every function is called by another function. Use the C<caller> builtin
@@ -626,6 +628,7 @@ interfaces.
=head2 Recursion
Z<recursion>
+
X<recursion>
X<call frame>
X<functions; call frame>
@@ -739,6 +742,7 @@ invocation are safe and separate:
=head2 Tail Calls
Z<tail_calls>
+
X<recursion; guard conditions>
One I<drawback> of recursion is that it's easy to write a function which calls
View
2  sections/implicit_ideas.pod
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ X<C<s///>; substitution operator>
X<C<m//>; match operator>
X<C<tr//>; transliteration operator>
-Perl's regular expression facilities (L<regex>) default to C<$_> to match,
+Perl's regular expression facilities (L<chp.regex>) default to C<$_> to match,
substitute, and transliterate:
=begin programlisting
View
6 sections/missing_defaults.pod
@@ -4,11 +4,11 @@ Z<missing_defaults>
Perl's language design process has always tried to combine practicality with
expandability, but it was as impossible to predict the future in 1994 as it is
-in 2014. Perl 5 expanded the language and made the CPAN possible, but it also
+in 2015. Perl 5 expanded the language and made the CPAN possible, but it also
retained backwards compatibility with most Perl 1 code written as far back as
1987.
-The best Perl code of 2014 is very different from the best Perl code of 1994 or
+The best Perl code of 2015 is very different from the best Perl code of 1994 or
the best Perl code of 1987.
X<CPAN; C<Task::Kensho>>
@@ -85,6 +85,7 @@ methods on lexical filehandles.
=head2 The autodie Pragma
Z<autodie>
+
X<C<autodie> pragma>
X<pragmas; C<autodie>>
@@ -110,6 +111,7 @@ autodie> for more information.
=head2 Perl Version Numbers
Z<version_numbers>
+
X<CPAN; C<Perl::MinimumVersion>>
If you encounter a piece of Perl code without knowing when it was written or
View
1  sections/modules.pod
@@ -163,6 +163,7 @@ Portable programs are careful about case even if they don't have to be.
=head2 Exporting
Z<exporting>
+
X<exporting>
A module can make package global symbols available to other packages through a
View
1  sections/moose.pod
@@ -465,6 +465,7 @@ Sometimes it's useful to know I<what> an object does and what that I<means>.
=head2 Roles
Z<roles>
+
X<roles>
A I<role> is a named collection of behavior and stateN<See the P6 design
View
2  sections/nested_data_structures.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
=head1 Nested Data Structures
Z<nested_data_structures>
+
X<data structures>
X<nested data structures>
@@ -137,6 +138,7 @@ to use Perl's various data structures.
=head2 Autovivification
Z<autovivification>
+
X<autovivification>
When you attempt to write to a component of a nested data structure, Perl will
View
3  sections/operator_characteristics.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
=head1 Operator Characteristics
Z<operator_characteristics>
+
X<operators; characteristics>
Every operator possesses several important characteristics which govern its
@@ -16,6 +17,7 @@ their complicated names before.
=head2 Precedence
Z<precedence>
+
X<precedence>
The I<precedence> of an operator governs when Perl should evaluate it in an
@@ -42,6 +44,7 @@ associativity (L<associativity>) and fixity (L<fixity>) break the tie.
=head2 Associativity
Z<associativity>
+
X<associativity>
X<associativity; left>
X<left associativity>
View
1  sections/overloading.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
=head1 Overloading
Z<overloading>
+
X<overloading>
Perl is not a pervasively object oriented language. Its core data types
View
1  sections/packages.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
=head1 Packages
Z<packages>
+
X<packages>
X<namespaces>
View
1  sections/references.pod
@@ -468,6 +468,7 @@ lifespan of filehandles as a feature of Perl's memory management.
=head2 Reference Counts
Z<reference_counts>
+
X<references; reference counting>
X<lexicals; lifecycle>
View
2  sections/regular_expressions.pod
@@ -473,6 +473,7 @@ boundary and C<\B{wb}> to match anywhere except a Unicode word boundary.
=head1 Character Classes
Z<character_classes>
+
X<character classes>
X<C<[]>; character class regex metacharacters>
@@ -563,6 +564,7 @@ backslashes as seen in C<$area_code>.
=head2 Named Captures
Z<named_captures>
+
X<regex; captures>
X<regex; named captures>
X<<< C<< (?<>) >>; regex named capture >>>
View
1  sections/scope.pod
@@ -117,6 +117,7 @@ enables closures (L<closures>).
=head2 Our Scope
Z<our>
+
X<builtins; C<our>>
X<packages; scope>
X<scope; packages>
View
7 sections/values.pod
@@ -234,6 +234,7 @@ Using a string in a non-string context will induce coercion (L<coercion>).
=head2 Unicode and Strings
Z<unicode>
+
X<Unicode>
I<Unicode> is a system used to represent the characters of the world's written
@@ -271,9 +272,9 @@ character representation. Forget that you ever heard of bytes.
Unicode strings and binary strings look superficially similar. Each has a
C<length()>. Each supports standard string operations such as concatenation,
-splicing, and regular expression processing (L<regex>). Any string which is not
-purely binary data is textual data, and thus should be a sequence of Unicode
-characters.
+splicing, and regular expression processing (L<chp.regex>). Any string which is
+not purely binary data is textual data, and thus should be a sequence of
+Unicode characters.
However, because of how your operating system represents data on disk or from
users or over the network--as sequences of octets--Perl can't know if the data
View
1  sections/variables.pod
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
=head1 Variables
Z<variables>
+
X<variable>
A I<variable> in Perl is a storage location for a value (L<values>). While a
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