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@kbknapp @tormol @nelsonjchen @Vinatorul
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#[macro_use]
extern crate clap;
fn main() {
// This example shows how to create an application with several arguments using macro builder.
// It combines the simplicity of the from_usage methods and the performance of the Builder Pattern.
//
// The example below is functionally identical to the one in 01a_quick_example.rs and 01b_quick_example.rs
//
// Create an application with 5 possible arguments (2 auto generated) and 2 subcommands (1 auto generated)
// - A config file
// + Uses "-c filename" or "--config filename"
// - An output file
// + A positional argument (i.e. "$ myapp output_filename")
// - A debug flag
// + Uses "-d" or "--debug"
// + Allows multiple occurrences of such as "-dd" (for vary levels of debugging, as an example)
// - A help flag (automatically generated by clap)
// + Uses "-h" or "--help" (Only autogenerated if you do NOT specify your own "-h" or "--help")
// - A version flag (automatically generated by clap)
// + Uses "-V" or "--version" (Only autogenerated if you do NOT specify your own "-V" or "--version")
// - A subcommand "test" (subcommands behave like their own apps, with their own arguments
// + Used by "$ myapp test" with the following arguments
// > A list flag
// = Uses "-l" (usage is "$ myapp test -l"
// > A help flag (automatically generated by clap
// = Uses "-h" or "--help" (full usage "$ myapp test -h" or "$ myapp test --help")
// > A version flag (automatically generated by clap
// = Uses "-V" or "--version" (full usage "$ myapp test -V" or "$ myapp test --version")
// - A subcommand "help" (automatically generated by clap because we specified a subcommand of our own)
// + Used by "$ myapp help" (same functionality as "-h" or "--help")
let matches = clap_app!(myapp =>
(version: "1.0")
(author: "Kevin K. <kbknapp@gmail.com>")
(about: "Does awesome things")
(@arg CONFIG: -c --config +takes_value "Sets a custom config file")
(@arg INPUT: +required "Sets the input file to use")
(@arg debug: -d ... "Sets the level of debugging information")
(@subcommand test =>
(about: "controls testing features")
(version: "1.3")
(author: "Someone E. <someone_else@other.com>")
(@arg verbose: -v --verbose "Print test information verbosely")
)
).get_matches();
// Calling .unwrap() is safe here because "INPUT" is required (if "INPUT" wasn't
// required we could have used an 'if let' to conditionally get the value)
println!("Using input file: {}", matches.value_of("INPUT").unwrap());
// Gets a value for config if supplied by user, or defaults to "default.conf"
let config = matches.value_of("CONFIG").unwrap_or("default.conf");
println!("Value for config: {}", config);
// Vary the output based on how many times the user used the "debug" flag
// (i.e. 'myapp -d -d -d' or 'myapp -ddd' vs 'myapp -d'
match matches.occurrences_of("debug") {
0 => println!("Debug mode is off"),
1 => println!("Debug mode is kind of on"),
2 => println!("Debug mode is on"),
3 | _ => println!("Don't be crazy"),
}
// You can information about subcommands by requesting their matches by name
// (as below), requesting just the name used, or both at the same time
if let Some(matches) = matches.subcommand_matches("test") {
if matches.is_present("verbose") {
println!("Printing verbosely...");
} else {
println!("Printing normally...");
}
}
// more program logic goes here...
}
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