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test your log4perl logging
Perl
tag: 0.31

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lib/Test/Log
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MANIFEST
MANIFEST.SKIP
Makefile.PL
README

README

NAME
    Test::Log::Log4perl - test log4perl

SYNOPSIS
      # setup l4p
      use Log::Log4Perl;
      # do your normal Log::Log4Perl setup here
      use Test::Log::Log4perl;

      # get the loggers
      my $logger  = Log::Log4perl->get_logger("Foo::Bar");
      my $tlogger = Test::Log::Log4perl->get_logger("Foo::Bar");

      # test l4p
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start();

      # declare we're going to log something
      $tlogger->error("This is a test");

      # log that something
      $logger->error("This is a test");

      # test that those things matched
      Test::Log::Log4perl->end("Test that that logs okay");

      # we also have a simplified version:
      {
        my $foo = Test::Log::Log4perl->expect(['foo.bar.quux', warn => qr/hello/ ]);
        # ... do something that should log 'hello'
      }
      # $foo goes out of scope; this triggers the test.

DESCRIPTION
    This module can be used to test that you're logging the right thing with
    Log::Log4perl. It checks that we get what, and only what, we expect
    logged by your code.

    The basic process is very simple. Within your test script you get one or
    more loggers from Test::Log::Log4perl with the "get_logger" method just
    like you would with Log::Log4perl. You're going to use these loggers to
    declare what you think the code you're going to test should be logging.

      # declare a bunch of test loggers
      my $tlogger = Test::Log::Log4perl->get_logger("Foo::Bar");

    Then, for each test you want to do you need to start up the module.

      # start the test
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start();

    This diverts all subsequent attempts Log::Log4perl makes to log stuff
    and records them internally rather than passing them though to the
    Log4perl appenders as normal.

    You then need to declare with the loggers we created earlier what we
    hope Log4perl will be asked to log. This is the same syntax as
    Test::Log::Log4perl uses, except if you want you can use regular
    expressions:

      $tlogger->debug("fish");
      $tlogger->warn(qr/bar/);

    You then need to run your code that you're testing.

      # call some code that hopefully will call the log4perl methods
      # 'debug' with "fish" and 'warn' with something that contains 'bar'
      some_code();

    We finally need to tell Test::Log4Perl that we're done and it should do
    the comparisons.

      # start the test
      Test::Log::Log4perl->end("test name");

  Methods
    get_logger($category)
        Returns a new instance of Test::Log::Log4perl that can be used to
        log expected messages in the category passed.

    Test::Log::Log4perl->expect(%start_args, ['dotted.path', 'warn' =>
    qr(this), 'warn' => qr(that)], ..)
        Class convenience method. Used like this:

          { # start local scope
            my $foo = Test::Log::Log4perl->expect(['foo.bar.quux', warn => qr/hello/ ]);
            # ... do something that should log 'hello'
          } # $foo goes out of scope; this triggers the test.

    start
        Class method. Start logging. When you call this method it
        temporarily redirects all logging from the standard logging
        locations to the internal logging routine until end is called. Takes
        parameters to change the behavior of this (and only this) test. See
        below.

    debug(@what)
    info(@what)
    warn(@what)
    error(@what)
    fatal(@what)
        Instance methods. String of things that you're expecting to log, at
        the level you're expecting them, in what class.

    end()
    end($name)
        Ends the test and compares what we've got with what we expected.
        Switches logging back from being captured to going to wherever it
        was originally directed in the config.

  Ignoring All Logging Messages
    Sometimes you're going to be testing something that generates a load of
    spurious log messages that you simply want to ignore without testing
    their contents, but you don't want to have to reconfigure your log file.
    The simplest way to do this is to do:

      use Test::Log::Log4perl;
      Test::Log::Log4perl->suppress_logging;

    All logging functions stop working. Do not alter the Logging classes
    (for example, by changing the config file and use Log4perl's
    "init_and_watch" functionality) after this call has been made.

    This function will be effectively a no-op if the environmental variable
    "NO_SUPPRESS_LOGGING" is set to a true value (so if your code is
    behaving weirdly you can turn all the logging back on from the command
    line without changing any of the code)

  Selectively Ignoring Logging Messages By Priority
    It's a bad idea to completely ignore all messages. What you probably
    want to do is ignore some of the trivial messages that you don't care
    about, and just test that there aren't any unexpected messages of a set
    priority.

    You can temporarily ignore any logging messages that are made by passing
    parameters to the "start" routine

      # for this test, just ignore DEBUG, INFO, and WARN
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start( ignore_priority => "warn" );

      # you can use the levels constants to do the same thing
      use Log::Log4perl qw(:levels);
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start( ignore_priority => $WARN );

    You might want to ignore all logging events at all (this can be used as
    quick way to not test the actual log messages, but just ignore the
    output.

      # for this test, ignore everything
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start( ignore_priority => "everything" );

      # contary to readability, the same thing (try not to write this)
      use Log::Log4perl qw(:levels);
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start( ignore_priority => $OFF );

    Or you might want to not ignore anything (which is the default, unless
    you've played with the method calls mentioned below:)

      # for this test, ignore nothing
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start( ignore_priority => "nothing" );

      # contary to readability, the same thing (try not to write this)
      use Log::Log4perl qw(:levels);
      Test::Log::Log4perl->start( ignore_priority => $ALL );

    You can also permanently effect what things are ignored with the
    "ignore_priority" method call. This persists between tests and isn't
    automatically reset after each call to "start".

      # ignore DEBUG, INFO and WARN for all future tests
      Test::Log::Log4perl->ignore_priority("warn");

      # you can use the levels constants to do the same thing
      use Log::Log4perl qw(:levels);
      Test::Log::Log4perl->ignore_priority($WARN);

      # ignore everything (no log messages will be logged)
      Test::Log::Log4perl->ignore_priority("everything");

      # ignore nothing (messages will be logged reguardless of priority)
      Test::Log::Log4perl->ignore_priority("nothing");

    Obviously, you may temporarily override whatever permanent.

BUGS
    Logging methods don't return the number of appenders they've written to
    (or rather, they do, as it's always zero.)

    Changing the config file (if you're watching it) while this is testing /
    suppressing everything will probably break everything. As will creating
    new appenders, etc...

AUTHOR
      Chia-liang Kao <clkao@clkao.org>
      Mark Fowler <mark@twoshortplanks.com>

COPYRIGHT
      Copyright 2010 Chia-liang Kao all rights reserved.
      Copyright 2005 Fotango Ltd all rights reserved.

      Licensed under the same terms as Perl itself.

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