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What does a normalized address look like? #3

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mick opened this Issue Apr 10, 2013 · 4 comments

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mick commented Apr 10, 2013

Should we define our standard of normalized address? (or is there a good example somewhere already?)

open questions:
*2 or 3 letter address type abbreviations (ave, st)
*proper street name capitalization (not important for matching, but important for display)
*zipcodes +4 digits?

other questions?

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atogle Apr 11, 2013

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I'm not sure about the context here, but the USPS has a web service for address normalization that could be useful, either for defining standard addresses or just to use. Not sure about the terms/limits.

https://www.usps.com/business/web-tools-apis/address-information.htm

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atogle commented Apr 11, 2013

I'm not sure about the context here, but the USPS has a web service for address normalization that could be useful, either for defining standard addresses or just to use. Not sure about the terms/limits.

https://www.usps.com/business/web-tools-apis/address-information.htm

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mick Apr 11, 2013

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The plan is to make use of either Easypost or USPS APIs for a subset of the data (a unique set of street names / types) within large datasets, and use those responses to normalize the rest of the dataset without query the API every record.

I agree we would normalize to what USPS uses.

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mick commented Apr 11, 2013

The plan is to make use of either Easypost or USPS APIs for a subset of the data (a unique set of street names / types) within large datasets, and use those responses to normalize the rest of the dataset without query the API every record.

I agree we would normalize to what USPS uses.

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daguar Apr 12, 2013

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Agree with both of you in using USPS-based -- my understanding is that the EasyPost API most likely wraps around the USPS one (perhaps with a caching layer), but maybe we test that assumption?

@atogle The rationale for using EasyPost right now is that, ostensibly, usage is free/without limits that would affect our purposes: http://blog.geteasypost.com/post/40684464899/freeaddressverification

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daguar commented Apr 12, 2013

Agree with both of you in using USPS-based -- my understanding is that the EasyPost API most likely wraps around the USPS one (perhaps with a caching layer), but maybe we test that assumption?

@atogle The rationale for using EasyPost right now is that, ostensibly, usage is free/without limits that would affect our purposes: http://blog.geteasypost.com/post/40684464899/freeaddressverification

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You might also check one of the commercial "change of address"-companies to make sure that your format works with them too (I assume it should because USPS, but might be good to check). 

If you don't know what I'm talking about, these are companies where you upload a list of addresses (like your nonprofit's list of donors, or, ahem, direct mail marketing) and they  will update the addresses if those people have submitted a Change of Address to the USPS.

On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 8:39 AM, daguar notifications@github.com wrote:

Agree with both of you in using USPS-based -- my understanding is that the EasyPost API most likely wraps around the USPS one (perhaps with a caching layer), but maybe we test that assumption?

@atogle The rationale for using EasyPost right now is that, ostensibly, usage is free/without limits that would affect our purposes: http://blog.geteasypost.com/post/40684464899/freeaddressverification

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub:
#3 (comment)

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bensheldon commented Apr 12, 2013

You might also check one of the commercial "change of address"-companies to make sure that your format works with them too (I assume it should because USPS, but might be good to check). 

If you don't know what I'm talking about, these are companies where you upload a list of addresses (like your nonprofit's list of donors, or, ahem, direct mail marketing) and they  will update the addresses if those people have submitted a Change of Address to the USPS.

On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 8:39 AM, daguar notifications@github.com wrote:

Agree with both of you in using USPS-based -- my understanding is that the EasyPost API most likely wraps around the USPS one (perhaps with a caching layer), but maybe we test that assumption?

@atogle The rationale for using EasyPost right now is that, ostensibly, usage is free/without limits that would affect our purposes: http://blog.geteasypost.com/post/40684464899/freeaddressverification

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub:
#3 (comment)

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