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README.md

Raad v0.5.0

build status

Raad - Ruby as a daemon lightweight service wrapper.

Raad is a non-intrusive, lightweight, simple Ruby daemon wrapper. Basically any class which implements the start and stop methods, can be used seamlessly as a daemon or a normal console app.

Raad deamonizing will work the same way for both MRI Ruby and JRuby, without modification in your code.

Raad provides basic daemon control using the start/stop commands. Your code can also use the Raad logging module and benefit easy log file output while daemonized.

Installation

Gem

$ gem install raad

Bundler

Latest from github

gem "raad", :git => "git://github.com/praized/raad.git", :branch => "master"

Released gem

gem "raad", "~> 0.5.0"

Example

  • Create a class with a start and a stop method. Just by requiring 'raad', your class will be wrapped by Raad and become daemonizable.
require 'rubygems'
require 'raad'

class SimpleDaemon
  def start
    Raad::Logger.debug("SimpleDaemon start")
    while !Raad.stopped?
      Raad::Logger.info("SimpleDaemon running")
      sleep(1)
    end
  end

  def stop
    Raad::Logger.debug("SimpleDaemon stop")
  end
end
  • run it in console mode, ^C will stop it, calling the stop method
$ ruby simple_daemon.rb start
  • run it daemonized, by default ./simple_daemon.log and ./simple_daemon.pid will be created
$ ruby simple_daemon.rb -d start
  • stop daemon, removing ./simple_daemon.pid
$ ruby simple_daemon.rb stop

Documentation

Introduction

By requiring 'raad' in your class, it will automagically be wrapped by the Raad bootstrap code. When running your class file with the start parameter, Raad will call your class start method.

The start method should not return unless your service has completed its work or has been instructed to stop.

There are two ways to know when your service has been instructed to stop:

  • the stop method of your class will be called if it is defined
  • Raad.stopped? will return true

There are basically 3 ways to run execute your service:

  • start it in foreground console mode, useful for debugging, ^C to trigger the stop sequence
$ ruby your_service.rb start
  • start it as a detached, backgrounded daemon:
$ ruby your_service.rb -d start
  • stop the daemonized service by signaling it to execute the stop sequence
$ ruby your_service.rb stop

In console mode Raad logging for level :info and up and stdout, ie puts, will be displayed by default.

In daemon mode, Raad logging for level :info and up will be output in your_service.log log file and the your_service.pidpid file will be created.

To toggle output of all logging levels simply use the verbose -v parameter.

Supported rubies and environments

Raad has been tested on MRI 1.8.7, MRI 1.9.x REE 1.8.7, JRuby 1.6.x under OSX 10.6.8 and Linux Ubuntu 10.04

Command line options

usage: ruby <service>.rb [options] start|stop

Raad common options:
    -e, --environment NAME           set the execution environment (default: development)
    -l, --log FILE                   log to file (default: in console mode: no, daemonized: <service>.log)
    -s, --stdout                     log to stdout (default: in console mode: true, daemonized: false)
    -v, --verbose                    enable verbose logging (default: false)
        --pattern PATTERN            log4r log formatter pattern
    -c, --config FILE                config file (default: ./config/<service>.rb)
    -d, --daemonize                  run daemonized in the background (default: false)
    -P, --pid FILE                   pid file when daemonized (default: <service>.pid)
    -r, --redirect FILE              redirect stdout to FILE when daemonized (default: no)
    -n, --name NAME                  daemon process name (default: <service>)
        --timeout SECONDS            seconds to wait before force stopping the service (default: 60)
    -h, --help                       display help message

Note that the command line options will always override any config file settings if present.

-e, --environment NAME

Raad provides a way to pass an arbritary environment name on the command line. This environment name can later be retrieved in your code using the following methods:

  • Raad.env will return the symbolized environment name passed on the command line.
  • Raad.test? will return true if the enviroment name passed on the command line was test.
  • Raad.development? will return true if the enviroment name passed on the command line was development or dev.
  • Raad.stage? will return true if the enviroment name passed on the command line was stage or staging.
  • Raad.production? will return true if the enviroment name passed on the command line was production or prod.

Example:

$ ruby your_service.rb -e foobar start
if Raad.env == :foobar
  # do foobar stuff
end

if Raad.production?
  # never get here
end

Custom command line options

It is possible to add custom command line options to your service, in addition to Raad own command line options. To handle custom command line options simply define a self.options_parser class method in your service class. This method will be passed a OptionParser object into which you can add your rules plus also a Hash to set the parsed options values. The OptionParser object must be returned.

Check complete example file examples/custom_options.rb

Example:

# options_parser must be a class method 
#
# @param raad_parser [OptionParser] raad options parser to which custom options rules can be added
# @param parsed_options [Hash] set parsing results into this hash. retrieve it later in your code using Raad.custom_options
# @return [OptionParser] the modified options parser must be returned
def  self.options_parser(raad_parser, parsed_options)
  raad_parser.separator "Your service options:"

  raad_parser.on('-a', '--aoption PARAM', "some a option parameter") { |val| parsed_options[:aoption] = val }
  raad_parser.on('-b', '--boption PARAM', "some b option parameter") { |val| parsed_options[:boption] = val }

  raad_parser
end

The parsed options values can later be retrieved in your code using Raad.custom_options which will hold the Hash as set in your options_parser class method.

do_this if Raad.custom_options[:aoption] == 'a option parameter value'
$ ruby your_service.rb -h

usage: ruby <service>.rb [options] start|stop

Raad common options:
    -e, --environment NAME           set the execution environment (default: development)
    -l, --log FILE                   log to file (default: in console mode: no, daemonized: <service>.log)
    -s, --stdout                     log to stdout (default: in console mode: true, daemonized: false)
    -v, --verbose                    enable verbose logging (default: false)
        --pattern PATTERN            log4r log formatter pattern
    -c, --config FILE                config file (default: ./config/<service>.rb)
    -d, --daemonize                  run daemonized in the background (default: false)
    -P, --pid FILE                   pid file when daemonized (default: <service>.pid)
    -r, --redirect FILE              redirect stdout to FILE when daemonized (default: no)
    -n, --name NAME                  daemon process name (default: <service>)
        --timeout SECONDS            seconds to wait before force stopping the service (default: 60)
    -h, --help                       display help message

Your service options:
    -a, --aoption PARAM              some a option parameter
    -b, --boption PARAM              some b option parameter

Configuration and options

tbd.

Logging

Raad uses Log4r for logging and provides hooks for logging in your service. Here's an example of how to use Raad logging:

  Raad::Logger.debug("this is a message with level DEBUG")
  Raad::Logger.info("this is a message with level INFO")
  Raad::Logger.warn("this is a message with level WARN")
  Raad::Logger.error("this is a message with level ERROR")
  Raad::Logger.fatal("this is a message with level FATAL")
  • By default, Raad will output log messages of level INFO and higher.
  • If the -v, --verbose command line option is used, Raad will output all log messages (level DEBUG and higher).

Alternatively, the log output level can be set in your service using the Raad::Logger.level= method. The valid levels parameter are :debug, :info, :warn and :error.

Stop sequence details

tbd.

Testing

There are specs and a validation suite which ca be run in your current ruby environment:

$ rake spec
$ rake validation

Also, specs and validations can be run in all currently tested Ruby environement. For this RVM is required and the following rubies must be installed:

  • ruby-1.8.7
  • ree-1.8.7
  • ruby-1.9.3
  • jruby-1.6.7

In each of these rubies, the gemset @raad containing log4r ~> 1.1.9, rake ~> 0.9.2 and rspec ~> 2.6.0 must be created.

This RVM environment can be created/updated using:

$ rake rvm_setup

To launch the tests for all rubies use:

$ rake specs
$ rake validations

TODO

  • better doc
  • more examples

Dependencies

  • For normal usage, the log4r gem (~> 1.1.9) is required.
  • For testings, the rspec (~> 2.6.0), rake (~> 0.9.2) gems and RVM are required.

Author

Colin Surprenant, @colinsurprenant, http://github.com/colinsurprenant, colin.surprenant@needium.com, colin.surprenant@gmail.com

Acknowledgements

Thanks to the Thin (https://github.com/macournoyer/thin), Goliath (https://github.com/postrank-labs/goliath), Sinatra (https://github.com/bmizerany/sinatra) and Spoon (https://github.com/headius/spoon) projects for providing inspiration and/or code!

License

Raad is distributed under the Apache License, Version 2.0. See the LICENSE.md file.

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