Skip to content
New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Feature: add Intel 19.1 (2020) #6733

Merged
merged 1 commit into from Apr 29, 2020
Merged

Conversation

SSE4
Copy link
Contributor

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Mar 25, 2020

add new Intel C++ compiler release to the default settings.yml
https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-c-compiler-191-for-windows-release-notes-for-intel-parallel-studio-xe-2020
https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-c-compiler-191-for-linux-release-notes-for-intel-parallel-studio-xe-2020

related: #5699

Changelog: Feature: add Intel 19.1 (2020).
Docs: omit

  • Refer to the issue that supports this Pull Request.
  • If the issue has missing info, explain the purpose/use case/pain/need that covers this Pull Request.
  • I've read the Contributing guide.
  • I've followed the PEP8 style guides for Python code.
  • I've opened another PR in the Conan docs repo to the develop branch, documenting this one.

Note: By default this PR will skip the slower tests and will use a limited set of python versions. Check here how to increase the testing level by writing some tags in the current PR body text.

Signed-off-by: SSE4 <tomskside@gmail.com>
@memsharded
Copy link
Member

@memsharded memsharded commented Mar 25, 2020

Do we have some ABI compatibility guideline for the Intel compiler?
Why did we have only majors, and now we are adding a minor?
From here https://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/intel-c-compiler/topic/509597 it could be deduced that binaries will be compatible for major versions.

@SSE4
Copy link
Contributor Author

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Mar 26, 2020

this is hard to say, I've been studying the official documentation, but didn't find anything explicit about 19.0 vs 19.1 compatibilities. the main reason to expose a new version was a necessity to locate installation properly (19.0 and 19.1 have different directories). another indirect evidence is that they offer different redistributable packages for 19.0 and 19.1. one more interesting point is that 19.1 introduces C++17 support for the first time.

@danimtb
Copy link
Member

@danimtb danimtb commented Mar 27, 2020

We made the decision of adding only major versions based on the information here https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/are-intel-compiler-generated-objectsbinaries-backward-andor-forward-compatible-between

I think we should stick to that and find a way to locate the intel version installed

@SSE4
Copy link
Contributor Author

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Mar 27, 2020

to be honest, this is a fairly old article (from 2014), it may appear as they have changed their versioning scheme (e.g. GCC and Clang did that). I'll try to run some experiments locally to see if 19.0 and 19.1 are really compatible, as well as try to ask on Intel forum. right now it appears for me like 19.1 is not a minor release, as it brings many new features and removes some things (so it's breaking).

@danimtb
Copy link
Member

@danimtb danimtb commented Mar 27, 2020

Yes, now that I am reading some more documentation it feels that they have changed the version schema or something. Maybe this new version is required. Please post here your findings so we can discuss the changes. Thanks!

@SSE4
Copy link
Contributor Author

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Apr 6, 2020

update: there are documented standard library API changes:

Parallel STL for parallel and vector execution of the C++ STL
Intel(R) C++ Compiler is installed with Parallel STL, an implementation of the C++ standard library algorithms with support for execution policies.

Features/API changes

More algorithms support parallel and vector execution policies: find_first_of, is_heap, is_heap_until, replace, replace_if.
More algorithms support vector execution policies: remove, remove_if.
More algorithms support parallel execution policies: partial_sort.

@SSE4
Copy link
Contributor Author

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Apr 6, 2020

the post was published by the moderator:
https://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/intel-c-compiler/topic/851887

@danimtb
Copy link
Member

@danimtb danimtb commented Apr 6, 2020

I got access denied in that link even after logging in :(

@SSE4
Copy link
Contributor Author

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Apr 6, 2020

I'll share their feedback as soon as I have it

@SSE4
Copy link
Contributor Author

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Apr 7, 2020

@danimtb okay, now we have an official answer:

Hi Konstantin,

We really like your findings with ICC 19.0 and 19.1 compiler, here the solution to your questions.

We can't say that there is a change in versioning scheme, but the 2020 release of PSXE (PSXE-2020) has ICC 19.1 compiler.
There are some new features that are added into ICC 19.1 (shown by you) which are not there in ICC 19.0 compiler. So the new feature will not be compatible with the old versions, whereas the .o files made with the previous release will continue to work throughout the next major version and the same applies to .so files. So the libs which are built over 19.0 would continue to work with 19.1. But the .o and .so made by 19.1 may or may not work with older versions due to possible changes in run-time libraries. Even if you successfully compile your application using these run-time libraries there may be the chance that your resulting program will become unstable.
The product with which you are working must be demanding for a stable program, So I will suggest you to first check the stability of your program with all the libraries and API you are using in your program because they might cause incompatibilities.

You can also use -fabi-version=<val> flag with ICC compiler which will help you to select specific ABI implementations.

I hope your problem gets resolved, and I appreciate your findings because it is very important in order to make a stable and robust program.

Stay Healthy Stay Safe!

Warm Regards,

Abhishek

the most important part:
So the libs which are built over 19.0 would continue to work with 19.1. But the .o and .so made by 19.1 may or may not work with older versions due to possible changes in run-time libraries. Even if you successfully compile your application using these run-time libraries there may be the chance that your resulting program will become unstable.

@SSE4
Copy link
Contributor Author

@SSE4 SSE4 commented Apr 7, 2020

so, the summary, I think we need to have 19.1 in the default settings.yml
pros:

  1. Intel doesn't guarantee the stability if you mix 19.0 and 19.1 compiled .o files
  2. 19.1 has new C++ features, e.g. C++20 support and PSTL improvements
  3. 19.0 and 19.1 installations have to be discovered differently
  4. 19.0 and 19.1 provide different Visual Studio toolsets

danimtb
danimtb approved these changes Apr 7, 2020
@danimtb danimtb added this to the 1.25 milestone Apr 7, 2020
@danimtb danimtb requested a review from memsharded Apr 14, 2020
@memsharded memsharded merged commit 53a7d42 into conan-io:develop Apr 29, 2020
2 checks passed
Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment
Labels
None yet
Projects
None yet
Development

Successfully merging this pull request may close these issues.

None yet

4 participants