yongtang Convert bool map to struct{} map in etcd.go (#2381)
This fix converts bool map to struct{} map in etcd.go
(there might be several other places).

Signed-off-by: Yong Tang <yong.tang.github@outlook.com>
Latest commit 0f7d95b Dec 8, 2018

README.md

etcd

Name

etcd - enables reading zone data from an etcd version 3 instance.

Description

The data in etcd instance has to be encoded as a message like SkyDNS. It should also work just like SkyDNS.

The etcd plugin makes extensive use of the proxy plugin to forward and query other servers in the network.

Syntax

etcd [ZONES...]
  • ZONES zones etcd should be authoritative for.

The path will default to /skydns the local etcd3 proxy (http://localhost:2379). If no zones are specified the block's zone will be used as the zone.

If you want to round robin A and AAAA responses look at the loadbalance plugin.

etcd [ZONES...] {
    stubzones
    fallthrough [ZONES...]
    path PATH
    endpoint ENDPOINT...
    upstream [ADDRESS...]
    tls CERT KEY CACERT
}
  • stubzones enables the stub zones feature. The stubzone is only done in the etcd tree located under the first zone specified.

  • fallthrough If zone matches but no record can be generated, pass request to the next plugin. If [ZONES...] is omitted, then fallthrough happens for all zones for which the plugin is authoritative. If specific zones are listed (for example in-addr.arpa and ip6.arpa), then only queries for those zones will be subject to fallthrough.

  • PATH the path inside etcd. Defaults to "/skydns".

  • ENDPOINT the etcd endpoints. Defaults to "http://localhost:2379".

  • upstream upstream resolvers to be used resolve external names found in etcd (think CNAMEs) pointing to external names. If you want CoreDNS to act as a proxy for clients, you'll need to add the proxy plugin. If no ADDRESS is given, CoreDNS will resolve CNAMEs against itself. ADDRESS can be an IP address, and IP:port or a string pointing to a file that is structured as /etc/resolv.conf.

  • tls followed by:

    • no arguments, if the server certificate is signed by a system-installed CA and no client cert is needed
    • a single argument that is the CA PEM file, if the server cert is not signed by a system CA and no client cert is needed
    • two arguments - path to cert PEM file, the path to private key PEM file - if the server certificate is signed by a system-installed CA and a client certificate is needed
    • three arguments - path to cert PEM file, path to client private key PEM file, path to CA PEM file - if the server certificate is not signed by a system-installed CA and client certificate is needed.

Special Behaviour

CoreDNS etcd plugin leverages directory structure to look for related entries. For example an entry /skydns/test/skydns/mx would have entries like /skydns/test/skydns/mx/a, /skydns/test/skydns/mx/b and so on. Similarly a directory /skydns/test/skydns/mx1 will have all mx1 entries.

With etcd3, support for hierarchial keys are dropped. This means there are no directories but only flat keys with prefixes in etcd3. To accommodate lookups, etcdv3 plugin now does a lookup on prefix /skydns/test/skydns/mx/ to search for entries like /skydns/test/skydns/mx/a etc, and if there is nothing found on /skydns/test/skydns/mx/, it looks for /skydns/test/skydns/mx to find entries like /skydns/test/skydns/mx1.

This causes two lookups from CoreDNS to etcdv3 in certain cases.

Migration to etcdv3 API

With CoreDNS release 1.2.0, you'll need to migrate existing CoreDNS related data (if any) on your etcd server to etcdv3 API. This is because with etcdv3 support, CoreDNS can't see the data stored to an etcd server using etcdv2 API.

Refer this blog by CoreOS team to migrate to etcdv3 API.

Examples

This is the default SkyDNS setup, with everything specified in full:

. {
    etcd skydns.local {
        stubzones
        path /skydns
        endpoint http://localhost:2379
        upstream 8.8.8.8:53 8.8.4.4:53
    }
    prometheus
    cache 160 skydns.local
    loadbalance
    proxy . 8.8.8.8:53 8.8.4.4:53
}

Or a setup where we use /etc/resolv.conf as the basis for the proxy and the upstream when resolving external pointing CNAMEs.

. {
    etcd skydns.local {
        path /skydns
        upstream /etc/resolv.conf
    }
    cache 160 skydns.local
    proxy . /etc/resolv.conf
}

Multiple endpoints are supported as well.

etcd skydns.local {
    endpoint http://localhost:2379 http://localhost:4001
...

Before getting started with these examples, please setup etcdctl (with etcdv3 API) as explained here. This will help you to put sample keys in your etcd server.

If you prefer, you can use curl to populate the etcd server, but with curl the endpoint URL depends on the version of etcd. For instance, etcd v3.2 or before uses only [CLIENT-URL]/v3alpha/* while etcd v3.5 or later uses [CLIENT-URL]/v3/* . Also, Key and Value must be base64 encoded in the JSON payload. With, etcdctl these details are automatically taken care off. You can check this document for details.

Reverse zones

Reverse zones are supported. You need to make CoreDNS aware of the fact that you are also authoritative for the reverse. For instance if you want to add the reverse for 10.0.0.0/24, you'll need to add the zone 0.0.10.in-addr.arpa to the list of zones. Showing a snippet of a Corefile:

etcd skydns.local 10.0.0.0/24 {
    stubzones
...

Next you'll need to populate the zone with reverse records, here we add a reverse for 10.0.0.127 pointing to reverse.skydns.local.

% etcdctl put /skydns/arpa/in-addr/10/0/0/127 '{"host":"reverse.skydns.local."}'

Querying with dig:

% dig @localhost -x 10.0.0.127 +short
reverse.skydns.local.

Zone name as A record

The zone name itself can be used A record. This behavior can be achieved by writing special entries to the ETCD path of your zone. If your zone is named skydns.local for example, you can create an A record for this zone as follows:

% etcdctl put /skydns/local/skydns/ '{"host":"1.1.1.1","ttl":60}'

If you query the zone name itself, you will receive the created A record:

% dig +short skydns.local @localhost
1.1.1.1

If you would like to use DNS RR for the zone name, you can set the following:

% etcdctl put /skydns/local/skydns/x1 '{"host":"1.1.1.1","ttl":"60"}'
% etcdctl put /skydns/local/skydns/x2 '{"host":"1.1.1.2","ttl":"60"}'

If you query the zone name now, you will get the following response:

% dig +short skydns.local @localhost
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.2

Zone name as AAAA record

If you would like to use AAAA records for the zone name too, you can set the following:

% etcdctl put /skydns/local/skydns/x3 '{"host":"2003::8:1","ttl":"60"}'
% etcdctl put /skydns/local/skydns/x4 '{"host":"2003::8:2","ttl":"60"}'

If you query the zone name for AAAA now, you will get the following response:

% dig +short skydns.local AAAA @localhost
2003::8:1
2003::8:2

SRV record

If you would like to use SRV records, you can set the following:

% etcdctl put /skydns/local/skydns/x5 '{"host":"skydns-local.server","ttl":60,"priority":10,"port":8080}'

Please notice that the key host is the target in SRV, so it should be a domain name.

If you query the zone name for SRV now, you will get the following response:

% dig +short skydns.local SRV @localhost
10 100 8080 skydns-local.server.

TXT record

If you would like to use TXT records, you can set the following:

% etcdctl put /skydns/local/skydns/x6 '{"ttl":60,"text":"this is a random text message."}'

If you query the zone name for TXT now, you will get the following response:

% dig +short skydns.local TXT @localhost
"this is a random text message."