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Updated the introduction

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## Introduction
-Hi guys. It's Christopher Roach with you again after a very long hiatus for which I do apologize, but I'm back now and I'm looking forward to continuing this series on node development. This session will be sort of a hodgepodge of different topics that I think will be of good use to anyone who is considering making Node a regular staple of their development tool belt. Now that we've got a bit of a taste of Node after our first two sessions, I want to dive into some of the infrastructure that's grown up around node to help make developing node applications much easier. Today will be all about learning some of the tools and concepts that will, hopefully, make you much more effective and will aid you in the completion of this series.
+Hi guys. Well it's been a little while since our last session, and I do appologize for such a long hiatus, but I'm back now and I'm looking forward to continuing this series on node development.
-So, considering that it's been such a long break since our last session, and, in the interim, Node has advanced from release 0.4.5 to 0.6.10, I think a good topic to start off with would be the Node Version Manager, or nvm as it's typically referred to. As the name suggests, nvm will allow you to install and switch between several different versions of Node. Coupled with another tool for managing package installation named npm, you can create virtual environments around specific versions of both node and third party libraries making development much easier considering the volatility of the node world.
+This session will be sort of a hodgepodge of different topics that I think will be of good use to anyone who is considering making Node a regular staple of their development tool belt.
-After exploring these two pieces of software, we'll put them to use by creating our own virtual environment for the development of our blog system. We'll install a couple of third party packages to our environment, one of which will help to make our development go a bit faster, and the other will give us the ability to use templates when defining our views. Before finishing the "hands on" portion of our screencast, I'll go over one more very handy tool for development, the debugger. Which, though not terribly full-featured and a bit clumsy at times, will be an absolutely invaluable addition to your development arsenal, nonetheless.
+We've got a bit of a taste for node after our first two sessions, and now I want to go off on a bit of a tangent and dive into some of the infrastructure that's grown up around node to help make developing in it much easier. Today will be all about learning some of the tools and concepts that will, hopefully, make you much more effective and will also aid you in the completion of this series.
-Finally, before we end this session, I've received a few requests to explain how node works, specifically, what makes it different to more traditional thread-based systems. I'm going to run through an explanation that I hope will be both intuitive and interesting. Node is a great tool, but it's meant for a very specific purpose, and like all things, it has advantages in certain situations and disadvantages in other. Armed with this deeper understanding of what node is doing to make it such a great tool in certain situations, it's my hope that you'll be better equipped for deciding when to use, as well as, when not to use node for your development.
+So, considering that it's been such a long break since our last session, and, in the interim, Node has advanced from release 0.4.5 to 0.6.10, I think a good topic to start off with would be the Node Version Manager, or nvm as it's typically referred to. As the name suggests, nvm will allow you to install and switch between several different versions of Node. Coupled with another excellent tool for managing package installations called npm, you can create virtual environments around specific versions of both node and third party libraries making development much easier, especially considering the volatility of the node world.
+
+After exploring these two pieces of software, we'll put them to use by creating our own virtual environment for the development of our blog system. We'll install a couple of third party packages to this environment, one of which will help make our development go a bit faster, and the other will give us the ability to use templates when defining our views. Before finishing this "hands on" portion of our screencast, I'll go over one more very handy tool for development---the debugger---which, though not terribly full-featured and a bit clumsy at times, it will, nonetheless, be an absolutely invaluable addition to your development arsenal.
+
+Finally, before we end this session, I've received a few requests to explain how node works, specifically, what makes it different from more traditional thread-based systems. I'm going to run through an explanation that I hope will be both intuitive and enlightening. Node is a great tool, but it's meant for a very specific purpose, and like all things, it has advantages in certain situations and disadvantages in others. It's my hope that, armed with a deeper understanding of what node does that makes it such a great tool in certain circumstances, you'll be better equipped for deciding when to use, as well as, when not to use node for your development.
So, apologies made and summary out of the way, let's get right down to business.

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