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November 10, 2019 07:28
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cypress-io/github-action Action status cypress renovate-app badge

GitHub Action for running Cypress end-to-end and component tests. Includes npm, pnpm and Yarn installation, custom caching and lots of configuration options.

Examples

Current examples contained in this repository are based on Cypress 12.x and can be found in the examples directory. Examples for Legacy Configuration use Cypress 9.7.0 and are kept in the examples/v9 directory.

Live examples, such as example-basic.yml are shown together with a status badge. Click on the status badge to read the source code of the workflow, for example

End-to-End example

Some older external examples, linked to by this document, are based solely on Cypress 9 and below and therefore use a Legacy Configuration. These may need modification to be applied to Cypress 10 and later. Each of these external links is listed with a (legacy) notation.

Note: this package assumes that cypress is declared as a development dependency in the package.json file. The cypress npm module is required to run Cypress via its Module API.

End-to-End Testing

name: End-to-end tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      # Install npm dependencies, cache them correctly
      # and run all Cypress tests
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5

End-to-End example

The workflow file example-basic.yml shows how Cypress runs on GH Actions using Ubuntu (20 and 22), Windows, and macOS without additional OS dependencies necessary.

This workflow uses the default test type of End-to-End (E2E) Testing. Alternatively, Component Testing can be utilized by referencing the Component Testing section below.

Component Testing

To use Cypress Component Testing add component: true

name: End-to-end tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          component: true

Component Testing example

See the example project component-tests and the example-component-test.yml workflow for more details.

Action version

Best practice:

Our examples specify using branch v5 which is the action's latest major version:

- name: Cypress run
  uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5

When using cypress-io/github-action@v5 from your workflow file, you will automatically use the latest tag from branch v5.

Alternatively, to mitigate unforeseen breaks, bind to a specific tag, for example:

- name: Cypress run
  uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5.1.0

The changes associated with each tag are shown under GitHub's releases list. Refer also to the Changelog for an overview of major changes.

Browser

Specify the browser name or path with the browser parameter. The default browser, if none is specified, is the built-in Electron browser.

Chrome

name: Chrome
on: push
jobs:
  chrome:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    name: E2E on Chrome
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          browser: chrome

Chrome example

Firefox

name: Firefox
on: push
jobs:
  firefox:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    name: E2E on Firefox
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          browser: firefox

Firefox example

Edge

name: Edge
on: push
jobs:
  edge:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    name: E2E on Edge
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          browser: edge

Edge example

Headed

Run the browser in headed mode - as of Cypress v8.0 the cypress run command executes tests in headless mode by default

name: Chrome headed
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          browser: chrome
          headed: true

Docker image

You can run tests in a GH Action in your Docker container.

name: E2E in custom container
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    # Cypress Docker image with Chrome v106
    # and Firefox v106 pre-installed
    container: cypress/browsers:node18.12.0-chrome106-ff106
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          browser: chrome

Env

Specify the env argument with env parameter

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run with env
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          env: host=api.dev.local,port=4222

When passing the environment variables this way, unfortunately due to GitHub Actions syntax, the variables should be listed in a single line, which can be hard to read. As an alternative, you can use the step's env block where every variable can be set on its own line. In this case, you should prefix every variable with CYPRESS_ because such variables are loaded by Cypress automatically. The above code example is equivalent to:

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run with env
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        env:
          CYPRESS_host: api.dev.local
          CYPRESS_port: 4222

For more examples, see the workflows below, using environment variables for recording.

Env example

Specs

Specify the spec files to run with spec parameter

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    name: Cypress run
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          spec: cypress/e2e/spec1.cy.js

You can pass multiple specs and wild card patterns using multi-line parameter, see example-config.yml:

spec: |
  cypress/e2e/spec-a.cy.js
  cypress/**/*-b.cy.js

For more information, visit the Cypress command-line docs.

Project

Specify the project to run with project parameter

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    name: Cypress run
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          project: ./some/nested/folder

For more information, visit the Cypress command-line docs.

Record test results on Cypress Cloud

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    name: Cypress run
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
        env:
          # pass the Cypress Cloud record key as an environment variable
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY }}
          # pass GitHub token to allow accurately detecting a build vs a re-run build
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}

recording example

Tip 1: We recommend using the action with on: push instead of on: pull_request to get the most accurate information related to the commit on Cypress Cloud. With pull requests, the merge commit is created automatically and might not correspond to a meaningful commit in the repository.

Tip 2: we recommend passing the GITHUB_TOKEN secret (created by the GH Action automatically) as an environment variable. This will allow correctly identifying every build and avoid confusion when re-running a build.

Tip 3: if running on pull_request event, the commit message is "merge SHA into SHA", which is not what you want probably. You can overwrite the commit message sent to Cypress Cloud by setting an environment variable. See issue 124 for details.

Tip 4: to record the project needs projectId. Typically this value is saved in the Cypress Configuration File. If you want to avoid this, pass the projectId using an environment variable:

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    name: Cypress run
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
        env:
          # pass the Cypress Cloud record key as an environment variable
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY }}
          # pass GitHub token to allow accurately detecting a build vs a re-run build
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}
          # pass the project ID from the secrets through environment variable
          CYPRESS_PROJECT_ID: ${{ secrets.PROJECT_ID }}

Tag recordings

You can pass a single or multiple tags when recording a run. For example

name: tags
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    # let's make sure our "app" works on several versions of Node
    strategy:
      matrix:
        node: [16, 18, 20]
    name: E2E on Node v${{ matrix.node }}
    steps:
      - name: Setup Node
        uses: actions/setup-node@v3
        with:
          node-version: ${{ matrix.node }}
      - run: node -v

      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
          tag: node-${{ matrix.node }}
        env:
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY }}
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}

The recording will have tags as labels on the run.

Tags

You can pass multiple tags using commas like tag: node-18,nightly,staging.

Specify auto cancel after failures

Specify the number of failed tests that will cancel a run when using the Cypress Cloud Auto Cancellation feature.

This feature requires Cypress 12.6.0 or later and a Cypress Cloud Business or Enterprise account.

name: Cypress E2E Tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    name: E2E
    steps:
      - name: Setup Node
        uses: actions/setup-node@v3

      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
          # Cancel the run after 2 failed tests
          auto-cancel-after-failures: 2
        env:
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY }}
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}

See Auto Cancellation for more information.

Artifacts

If you don't record the test run on Cypress Cloud, you can still store generated videos and screenshots as CI artifacts. See the workflow example below.

name: Artifacts
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    name: Artifacts
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
      # after the test run completes store videos and any screenshots
      - uses: actions/upload-artifact@v3
        # add the line below to store screenshots only on failures
        # if: failure()
        with:
          name: cypress-screenshots
          path: cypress/screenshots
          if-no-files-found: ignore # 'warn' or 'error' are also available, defaults to `warn`
      - uses: actions/upload-artifact@v3
        with:
          name: cypress-videos
          path: cypress/videos
          if-no-files-found: ignore # 'warn' or 'error' are also available, defaults to `warn`

Quiet flag

You can provide quiet flag for cypress run to silence any Cypress specific output from stdout

name: example-quiet
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      # Install npm dependencies, cache them correctly
      # and run all Cypress tests with `quiet` parameter
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: ./
        with:
          working-directory: examples/quiet
          quiet: true

example-quiet

Config

Specify configuration values with config parameter

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    name: Cypress run
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          config: pageLoadTimeout=100000,baseUrl=http://localhost:3000

example-config

Config File

Specify the path to your config file with config-file parameter

name: Cypress tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    name: Cypress run
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          config-file: tests/cypress-config.json

Parallel

Note: Cypress parallelization requires a Cypress Cloud account.

You can spin multiple containers running in parallel using strategy: matrix argument. Just add more dummy items to the containers: [1, 2, ...] array to spin more free or paid containers. Then use record and parallel parameters to load balance tests.

name: Parallel Cypress Tests
on: push
jobs:
  test:
    name: Cypress run
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    strategy:
      # when one test fails, DO NOT cancel the other
      # containers, because this will kill Cypress processes
      # leaving Cypress Cloud hanging ...
      # https://github.com/cypress-io/github-action/issues/48
      fail-fast: false
      matrix:
        # run 3 copies of the current job in parallel
        containers: [1, 2, 3]
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3

      # because of "record" and "parallel" parameters
      # these containers will load balance all found tests among themselves
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
          parallel: true
          group: 'Actions example'
        env:
          # pass the Cypress Cloud record key as an environment variable
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY }}
          # Recommended: pass the GitHub token lets this action correctly
          # determine the unique run id necessary to re-run the checks
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}

Parallel run

Warning ⚠️: Cypress actions use GITHUB_TOKEN to get the correct branch and the number of jobs run, making it possible to re-run without the need of pushing an empty commit. If you don't want to use the GITHUB_TOKEN you can still run your tests without problem with the only note that Cypress Cloud's API connects parallel jobs into a single logical run using GitHub commit SHA plus workflow name. If you attempt to re-run GitHub checks, Cypress Cloud thinks the run has already ended. In order to truly rerun parallel jobs, push an empty commit with git commit --allow-empty -m "re-run checks" && git push. As another work around you can generate and cache a custom build id, read Adding a unique build number to GitHub Actions.

The Cypress GH Action does not spawn or create any additional containers - it only links the multiple containers spawned using the matrix strategy into a single logical Cypress Cloud run where it splits the specs amongst the machines. See the Cypress parallelization guide for the explanation.

During staged rollout of a new GitHub-hosted runner version, GitHub may provide a mixture of current and new image versions used by the container matrix. It is recommended to use a Docker image in the parallel job run which avoids any Cypress Cloud errors due to browser major version mismatch from the two different image versions. A Docker image is not necessary if testing against the default built-in Electron browser because this browser version is fixed by the Cypress version in use and it is unaffected by any GitHub runner image rollout.

Component and E2E Testing

Component Testing and End-to-End (E2E) Testing types can be combined in the same job using separate steps

- name: Run E2E tests
  uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5

- name: Run Component Testing
  uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  with:
    # we have already installed everything
    install: false
    component: true

See the example project component-test and the example-component-test.yml workflow for more details.

Build app

You can run a build step before starting tests

name: Build
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          build: npm run build

Start server

If your tests run against a local server, use the start parameter to start your server. The server will run in the background.

name: With server
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          start: npm start

Note: sometimes on Windows you need to run a different start command. You can use the start-windows parameter for this.

name: With server
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          # Linux and MacOS
          start: npm start
          # Takes precedences on Windows
          start-windows: npm run start:windows:server

start example

Note: A server continues to run until the end of the GitHub workflow job that started it. At the end of the job the GitHub workflow runner executes a "Complete job" phase automatically where it terminates any server processes which are still running.

Start multiple servers

You can start multiple server processes. For example, if you have an API to start using npm run api and the web server to start using npm run web you can put those commands in start using comma separation.

name: With servers
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          start: npm run api, npm run web

You can place the start commands in separate lines

with:
  start: |
    npm run api
    npm run web

start example

Wait-on

If you are starting a local server and it takes a while to start, you can add a parameter wait-on and pass url to wait for the server to respond.

name: After server responds
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          start: npm start
          # quote the url to be safe against YML parsing surprises
          wait-on: 'http://localhost:8080'

wait-on example

Webpack Dev Server example (also uses wait-on)

By default, wait-on will retry for 60 seconds. You can pass a custom timeout in seconds using wait-on-timeout.

- uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  with:
    start: npm start
    wait-on: 'http://localhost:8080/status'
    # wait for 2 minutes for the server to respond
    wait-on-timeout: 120

You can wait for multiple URLs to respond by separating urls with a comma

- uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  with:
    # API runs on port 3050
    # Web server runs on port 8080
    start: npm run api, npm run web
    # wait for all services to respond
    wait-on: 'http://localhost:3050, http://localhost:8080'

The action will wait for the first url to respond, then will check the second url, and so on.

You can even use your own command (usually by using npm, yarn, npx) to wait for the server to respond. For example, if you want to use the wait-on utility to ping the server and run the Cypress tests after the server responds:

- uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  with:
    start: npm start
    wait-on: 'npx wait-on --timeout 60000 http://localhost:3000'

See example-wait-on.yml workflow file.

If this action times out waiting for the server to respond, please see Debugging section in this README file.

wait-on with Node.js 18+

Under Node.js version 18 and later, wait-on may fail to recognize that a localhost server is running. This affects development web servers which do not listen on both IPv4 and IPv6 network stacks.

  • Check your server documentation to see if it can be started using 0.0.0.0 (all addresses) and use this if available. If this option is not available or does not resolve the issue then carry on to the next steps:
  • If the action log shows that wait-on is failing to connect to 127.0.0.1, replace localhost by [::1] (the IPv6 loopback address)
  • If the action log shows that wait-on is failing to connect to ::1, replace localhost by 127.0.0.1 (the IPv4 loopback address)

Custom install command

If you want to overwrite the install command

- uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  with:
    install-command: yarn --frozen-lockfile --silent

See example-install-command.yml workflow file.

Command prefix

You can prefix the default test command using the command-prefix option. This is useful for example when running Percy, which requires the test command to be wrapped with percy exec --.

name: Visual
on: push
jobs:
  e2e:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          start: npm start
          # quote the url to be safe against YML parsing surprises
          wait-on: 'http://localhost:8080'
          # the entire command will automatically be prefixed with "npm"
          # and we need the second "npm" to execute "cypress run ..." command line
          command-prefix: 'percy exec -- npx'

Custom test command

You can overwrite the Cypress run command with your own command.

steps:
  - name: Checkout 🛎
    uses: actions/checkout@v3

  - name: Custom tests 🧪
    uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
    with:
      command: npm run e2e:ci

Caution: using the action parameter command causes multiple other parameters to be ignored including: auto-cancel-after-failures, browser, ci-build-id, command-prefix, component, config, config-file, env, group, headed, parallel, project, publish-summary, quiet, record, spec and tag.

See example-custom-command.yml file.

Custom build id

You can overwrite ci-build-id used to link separate machines running tests into a single parallel run.

name: Parallel
on: push
jobs:
  test:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    strategy:
      matrix:
        # run 3 copies of the current job in parallel
        containers: [1, 2, 3]
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
          parallel: true
          group: 'Actions example'
          ci-build-id: '${{ github.sha }}-${{ github.workflow }}-${{ github.event_name }}'
        env:
          # pass the Cypress Cloud record key as an environment variable
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY }}
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}

Tip: see Learn GitHub Actions, with sections on Expressions, Contexts and Environment variables.

Robust custom build id

If you re-run the GitHub workflow, if you use the same custom build id during recording, Cypress Cloud will cancel the run with "Build already finished" error. To avoid this, you need to generate a new custom build id on every workflow re-run. A good solution showing in the example-custom-ci-build-id.yml file is to run a common job first that just generates a new random ID. This ID can be used by the testing jobs to tie the build together. If the user re-runs the workflow a new unique build id is generated, allowing recording the new Cypress Cloud run.

jobs:
  # single job that generates and outputs a common id
  prepare:
    outputs:
      uuid: ${{ steps.uuid.outputs.value }}
    steps:
      - name: Generate unique ID 💎
        id: uuid
        # take the current commit + timestamp together
        # the typical value would be something like
        # "sha-5d3fe...35d3-time-1620841214"
        run: echo "value=sha-$GITHUB_SHA-time-$(date +"%s")" >> $GITHUB_OUTPUT
  smoke-tests:
    needs: ['prepare']
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
          parallel: true
          ci-build-id: ${{ needs.prepare.outputs.uuid }}
        env:
          # pass the Cypress Cloud record key as an environment variable
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.EXAMPLE_RECORDING_KEY }}

See the example-custom-ci-build-id.yml for the full workflow.

Working directory

In a monorepo, the end-to-end or component test might be placed in a different sub-folder from the application itself.

Using a Cypress legacy configuration (Version 9 or earlier) the structure could look like this:

repo/
  app/
  app-test/
    cypress/
      fixtures/
      integration/
      plugins/
      support/
    cypress.json
  package.json

For End-to-End testing using a Cypress configuration for Version 10 and later, the structure could look like this :

repo/
  app/
  app-test/
    cypress/
      e2e/
      fixtures/
      support/
    cypress.config.js
  package.json

Similarly for Component Testing with a Cypress configuration for Version 10 and later, the structure could look like this:

repo/
  app/
  app-test/
    cypress/
      component/
      fixtures/
      support/
    cypress.config.js
  package.json

You can specify the app-test working directory when running Cypress tests using the working-directory parameter

on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          start: npm start
          working-directory: app-test

See example-basic.yml for an End-to-End test example and example-component-test.yml for a Component test example, using the parameter working-directory.

Subfolders

Sometimes Cypress and end-to-end tests have their own package.json file in a subfolder, like

root/
  e2e/
    (code for installing and running Cypress tests)
    package.json
    package-lock.json
    cypress.json
    cypress

  (code for running the "app" with "npm start")
  package.json
  yarn.lock

In that case you can combine this action with bahmutov/npm-install action to install dependencies separately.

name: E2E
on: push
jobs:
  test:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@master
      - name: Install root dependencies
        uses: bahmutov/npm-install@v1

      - name: Start server in the background
        run: npm start &

      # Cypress has its own package.json in folder "e2e"
      - name: Install Cypress and run tests
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          working-directory: e2e

See cypress-gh-action-subfolders (legacy) for example.

pnpm

The package manager pnpm is not pre-installed in GitHub Actions runner images (unlike npm and yarn): to install pnpm include pnpm/action-setup in your workflow. If the action finds a pnpm-lock.yaml file, it uses the pnpm command pnpm install --frozen-lockfile by default to install dependencies.

name: example-basic-pnpm
on: push
jobs:
  basic-pnpm:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Install pnpm
        uses: pnpm/action-setup@v2
        with:
          version: 7
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          working-directory: examples/basic-pnpm

pnpm example

Yarn Classic

If a yarn.lock file is found, the action uses the Yarn 1 (Classic) command yarn --frozen-lockfile by default to install dependencies.

name: example-yarn-classic
on: push
jobs:
  yarn-classic:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          working-directory: examples/yarn-classic

Yarn classic example

Yarn Modern

To install dependencies using a yarn.lock file from Yarn Modern (Yarn 2 and later) you need to override the default Yarn 1 (Classic) installation command yarn --frozen-lockfile. You can do this by using the install-command parameter and specifying yarn install for example:

name: example-yarn-modern
on: push
jobs:
  yarn-classic:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          working-directory: examples/yarn-modern
          install-command: yarn install

Yarn Modern example

Yarn Plug'n'Play

When using Yarn Modern (Yarn 2 and later) with Plug'n'Play enabled, you will need to use the command parameter to run yarn instead of npx.

name: example-yarn-modern-pnp
on: push
jobs:
  yarn-classic:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          working-directory: examples/yarn-modern-pnp
          install-command: yarn install
          command: yarn cypress run

Yarn Plug'n'Play example

Caution: using the action parameter command causes multiple other parameters to be ignored. See command section for more information.

Yarn workspaces

This action should discover the Yarn workspaces correctly. For example, see folder examples/start-and-yarn-workspaces and workflow file example-start-and-yarn-workspaces.yml

name: example-start-and-yarn-workspaces
on: push
jobs:
  single:
    # the example has Yarn workspace in its "root" folder
    # examples/start-and-yarn-workspaces
    # and tests in a subfolder like "workspace-1"
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          working-directory: examples/start-and-yarn-workspaces/workspace-1
          build: yarn run build
          start: yarn start
          wait-on: 'http://localhost:5000'

Yarn workspaces example

Custom cache key

Sometimes the default cache key does not work. For example, if you cannot share the Node modules across Node versions due to native extensions. In that case pass your own cache-key parameter.

name: End-to-end tests
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    # let's make sure our "app" works on several versions of Node
    strategy:
      matrix:
        node: [16, 18, 20]
    name: E2E on Node v${{ matrix.node }}
    steps:
      - name: Setup Node
        uses: actions/setup-node@v3
        with:
          node-version: ${{ matrix.node }}
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      # run Cypress tests and record them under the same run
      # associated with commit SHA and just give a different group name
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          record: true
          group: Tests on Node v${{ matrix.node }}
          cache-key: node-v${{ matrix.node }}-on-${{ runner.os }}-hash-${{ hashFiles('yarn.lock') }}
        env:
          CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY }}
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}

Node versions

You can run your tests across multiple Node versions.

name: Node versions
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    strategy:
      matrix:
        node: [16, 18, 20]
    name: E2E on Node v${{ matrix.node }}
    steps:
      - uses: actions/setup-node@v3
        with:
          node-version: ${{ matrix.node }}
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5

Node versions example

Split install and tests

Sometimes you may want to run additional commands between installation and tests. To enable this use the install and runTests parameters.

name: E2E
on: push
jobs:
  test:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@master
      - name: Install dependencies
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          # just perform install
          runTests: false
      - run: yarn lint
      - name: Run e2e tests
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          # we have already installed all dependencies above
          install: false
          # Cypress tests and config file are in "e2e" folder
          working-directory: e2e

See cypress-gh-action-monorepo for a working example.

Custom install

Finally, you might not need this GH Action at all. For example, if you want to split the npm dependencies installation from the Cypress binary installation, then it makes no sense to use this action. Instead you can install and cache Cypress yourself. See cypress-gh-action-split-install (legacy) for a working example.

Install Cypress only

If the project has many dependencies, but you want to install just Cypress you can combine this action with actions/cache and npm i cypress commands yourself.

- uses: actions/checkout@v3
- uses: actions/cache@v2
  with:
    path: |
      ~/.cache/Cypress
      node_modules
    key: my-cache-${{ runner.os }}-${{ hashFiles('package-lock.json') }}
- run: npm i cypress
- uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  with:
    install: false

Install only Cypress example

Timeouts

You can tell the CI to stop the job or the individual step if it runs for longer then a given time limit. This is a good practice to ensure the hanging process does not accidentally use up all your CI minutes.

jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    # stop the job if it runs over 10 minutes
    # to prevent a hanging process from using all your CI minutes
    timeout-minutes: 10
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        # you can specify individual step timeout too
        timeout-minutes: 5

See cypress-gh-action-example (legacy).

More examples

Name Description
cypress-io/cypress-example-kitchensink Runs every API command in Cypress using various CI platforms including GitHub Actions
cypress-io/cypress-realworld-app A real-world example payment application. Uses GitHub Actions and CircleCI.
cypress-gh-action-small-example (legacy) Runs tests and records them on Cypress Cloud
cypress-gh-action-example (legacy) Uses Yarn, and runs in parallel on several versions of Node, different browsers, and more
cypress-gh-action-monorepo Splits install and running tests commands, runs Cypress from sub-folder
cypress-gh-action-subfolders (legacy) Has separate folder for Cypress dependencies
cypress-gh-action-split-install (legacy) Only install npm dependencies, then install and cache Cypress binary yourself
cypress-gh-action-changed-files (legacy) Shows how to run different Cypress projects depending on changed files
cypress-examples Shows separate install job from parallel test jobs
cypress-gh-action-split-jobs Shows a separate install job with the build step, and another job that runs the tests

Notes

Installation

This action installs local dependencies using lock files. Ensure that exactly one type of lock file is used for each project or working-directory from the following supported package managers:

Lock file Package Manager Installation command
package-lock.json npm npm ci
pnpm-lock.yaml pnpm pnpm install --frozen-lockfile
yarn.lock Yarn Classic yarn --frozen-lockfile

See section Yarn Modern for information about using Yarn version 2 and later.

Debugging

This action uses the debug module to output additional verbose logs. You can see these debug messages by setting the following environment variable:

DEBUG: @cypress/github-action

You can set the environment variable using GitHub UI interface, or in the workflow file:

- name: Cypress tests with debug logs
  uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  env:
    DEBUG: '@cypress/github-action'

See the example-debug.yml workflow file.

Logs from the test runner

The above ACTIONS_STEP_DEBUG setting enables the debug logs from the action itself. To see the Cypress debug logs add an environment variable to the action:

- name: Cypress tests with debug logs
  uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  env:
    DEBUG: 'cypress:*'

Debugging waiting for URL to respond

If you have a problem with wait-on not working, you can check the src/ping.js logic from the local machine.

  • clone this repository to the local machine
  • install dependencies with npm install
  • start your server
  • from another terminal call the ping yourself to validate the server is responding:
$ node src/ping-cli.js <url>

For example

$ node src/ping-cli.js https://example.cypress.io
pinging url https://example.cypress.io for 30 seconds
::debug::pinging https://example.cypress.io has finished ok

More information

Extras

Manual trigger

If you add workflow_dispatch event to your workflow, you will be able to start the workflow by clicking a button on the GitHub page, see the Test External Site Using GitHub Actions video.

Outputs

This action sets a GitHub step output resultsUrl if the run was recorded on Cypress Cloud using the action parameter setting record: true (see Record test results on Cypress Cloud). Note that using a Custom test command with the command parameter overrides the record parameter and in this case no resultsUrl step output is saved.

This is an example of using the step output resultsUrl:

- name: Cypress tests
  uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
  # let's give this action an ID so we can refer
  # to its output values later
  id: cypress
  # Continue the build in case of an error, as we need to set the
  # commit status in the next step, both in case of success or failure
  continue-on-error: true
  with:
    record: true
  env:
    CYPRESS_RECORD_KEY: ${{ secrets.RECORDING_KEY }}
- name: Print Cypress Cloud URL
  run: |
    echo Cypress finished with: ${{ steps.cypress.outcome }}
    echo See results at ${{ steps.cypress.outputs.resultsUrl }}

The GitHub step output dashboardUrl is deprecated. Cypress Dashboard is now Cypress Cloud.

recording example

Note: every GitHub workflow step can have outcome and conclusion properties. See the GitHub Contexts documentation section steps context. In particular, the outcome or conclusion value can be success, failure, cancelled, or skipped which you can use in any following steps.

Print Cypress info

Sometimes you might want to print Cypress and OS information, like the list of detected browsers. You can use the cypress info command for this.

If you are NOT using the build command in your project, you can run the cypress info command:

name: info
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          build: npx cypress info

If you are already using the build parameter, you can split the installation and the test steps and insert the cypress info command in between:

name: info
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress install
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          # just perform install
          runTests: false
      - name: Cypress info
        run: npx cypress info
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          # we have already installed all dependencies above
          install: false
          # rest of your parameters

Nightly tests

Sometimes you want to execute the workflow on a schedule. For example, to run Cypress tests nightly, you can schedule the workflow using cron syntax:

name: example-cron
on:
  schedule:
    # runs tests every day at 4am
    - cron: '0 4 * * *'
jobs:
  nightly:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress nightly tests 🌃
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5

cron example

Suppress test summary

The default test summary can be suppressed by using the parameter publish-summary and setting its value to false. Sometimes users want to publish test summary using a specific action. For example, a user running Cypress tests using a matrix and wants to retrieve the test summary for each matrix job and use a specific action that merges reports.

name: Example no summary
on: push
jobs:
  cypress-run:
    runs-on: ubuntu-22.04
    steps:
      - name: Checkout
        uses: actions/checkout@v3
      - name: Cypress run
        uses: cypress-io/github-action@v5
        with:
          publish-summary: false

Node.js Support

Node.js is required to run this action. The current version v5 supports:

  • Node.js 16.x
  • Node.js 18.x
  • Node.js 20.x and above

and is generally aligned with Node.js's release schedule.

Changelog

See Releases for full details of changes.

Version Changes
v5.8.1 Examples remove Node.js 19. End of support for Node.js 19.
v5.8.0 Add GitHub step output resultsUrl. Deprecate dashboardUrl.
v5.6.2 Examples add Node.js 20. End of support and removal of Node.js 14 examples.
v5.2.0 Examples add Node.js 19.
v5.0.0 Examples add Node.js 18 and remove Node.js 12.
v4.2.2 Dependency on GitHub set-output workflow command removed.
v4.2.0 Support for pnpm added.
v4.0.0 Support for Cypress 10 and later versions added.
v3 Action runs under Node.js 16 instead of Node.js 12.
v2 Cypress runs using the Module API instead of being started via the command line.
v1 This version is no longer runnable in GitHub due to security changes.

Note: GitHub announced their plan to disable save-state and set-output commands. This will prevent cypress-io/github-action version v4.2.1 and earlier from running, since they use set-output. Affected users should update to using v5 of the cypress-io/github-action action.

Contributing

Please see our Contributing Guideline which explains how to contribute fixes or features to the repo and how to test.

License

license

This project is licensed under the terms of the MIT license.