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fixed english mistake on text

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1 parent fbbe932 commit fe8390b3419ad53a7427dd8699e106745d3077a6 @danielabsilva committed Apr 27, 2012
Showing with 7 additions and 8 deletions.
  1. +5 −5 data.html
  2. +2 −3 index.html
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10 data.html
@@ -2,25 +2,25 @@
<html lang="pt-br">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8" />
- <meta name="description" content="A tutorial on how to find, get and use open spacial data to make play-doh planets"/>
+ <meta name="description" content="A tutorial on how to find, get and use open spatial data to make play-doh planets"/>
<meta name="keywords" content="tutorial, stopmotion, playdoh, play-doh, space apps challenge, space, planets, open data, nasa, earth, the size of earth", "google docs" />
- <title>Play-doh Planets - How to find, scrape and use the open spacial data you need</title>
+ <title>Play-doh Planets - How to find, scrape and use the open spatial data you need</title>
<!--<link rel='stylesheet' href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Mystery+Quest' type='text/css' />-->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="css/style.css" type="text/css" media="screen" />
<!--<link rel="shortcut icon" href="img/favico.png" type="image/x-icon" />-->
</head>
<body>
<h1>How to Make Play-Doh Planets!</h1>
<h2>(or a making-of for "The Size of Earth" Movie)</h2>
- <h3>Step 1: How to find, get and use the open spacial data you need</h3>
+ <h3>Step 1: How to find, get and use the open spatial data you need</h3>
<p>Instead of making a set of play-doh balls of randomic size, if you want to make your own play-doh planets, the coolest thing is to keep them in <strike>a real</strike> an acceptable scale. So you can compare how big or small some celestial bodies are compared to others. The idea is not being totally accurate (with play-doh, I don't even think it would be possible), but just playing with the sizes and proportions. For that, you will need some data on the planets you want to make.</p>
<p><strong>Where to find the data?</strong></p>
- <p>There is a lot of information on different planets and stars all over the internet - thanks to the people who are building this incredible knowledge and sharing it with all of us. I could have easily gone to Wikipedia and copied all the information I needed, but I thought it would be cooler to use open spacial data instead. Open data is what you have when data of public interest is <a href="http://opendefinition.org/">free for anyone to use, reuse, and redistribute it</a>. There is a list of principles of open government data <a href="https://public.resource.org/8_principles.html">here</a>. Many countries in the world are starting to release the public information they have as open government data.</p>
+ <p>There is a lot of information on different planets and stars all over the internet - thanks to the people who are building this incredible knowledge and sharing it with all of us. I could have easily gone to Wikipedia and copied all the information I needed, but I thought it would be cooler to use open spatial data instead. Open data is what you have when data of public interest is <a href="http://opendefinition.org/">free for anyone to use, reuse, and redistribute it</a>. There is a list of principles of open government data <a href="https://public.resource.org/8_principles.html">here</a>. Many countries in the world are starting to release the public information they have as open government data.</p>
- <p>But even more important than having governments releasing data is to have people who are willing to use them. So this was the kind of information I was looking for: reliable data from a public spacial program, in an open format, that could be used to calculate my play-doh planets sizes in an acceptable scale.</p>
+ <p>But even more important than having governments releasing data is to have people who are willing to use them. So this was the kind of information I was looking for: reliable data from a public spatial program, in an open format, that could be used to calculate my play-doh planets sizes in an acceptable scale.</p>
<p>Nasa has its own open data catalog - the <a href="http://data.nasa.gov/">data.nasa.gov</a> website. It references many databases that are also featured on <a href="http://data.gov">data.gov</a>, the american government open data portal. But I couldn't find what I needed there. As I was participating on the <a href="http://spaceappschallenge.org">International Space Apps Challenge</a> (and on a deadline), I went to the <a href="http://webchat.freenode.net/">#spaceapps IRC channel</a> and asked if anyone knew where I could find a reliable source with information on the size of Earth and other planets.</p>
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5 index.html
@@ -15,8 +15,7 @@
<p>On April 21st 2012, me and other 10 hackers gathered at the <a href="http://www.casadaculturadigital.com.br">House of Digital Culture</a>, São Paulo, Brazil, to the 1st edition of the <a href="http://spaceappschallenge.org">International Space Apps Challenge</a>.</p>
- <p>I was very excited, because I love the space, the planets and the stars. I wanted to work on a project, but I am not really a coder (although I recently started learning CSS and HTML - basically, I have the skills to make a website just like this you are reading right now, and that is it :P). Actually, nor me, nor Erica (the only other women in the room at the time the hackathon started) are coders - and not having women participating on the challenges would be super lame. So I wanted to show <strong>how people can use very simple web tools (+ creativity, + fun!) to hack spacial data and build something cool out of it</strong>.</p>
-
+ <p>I was very excited, because I love the space, the planets and the stars. I wanted to work on a project, but I am not really a coder (although I recently started learning CSS and HTML - basically, I have the skills to make a website just like this you are reading right now, and that is it :P). Actually, nor me, nor Erica (the only other women in the room at the time the hackathon started) are coders - and not having women participating on the challenges would be super lame. So I wanted to show <strong>how people can use very simple web tools (+ creativity, + fun!) to hack spatial data and build something cool out of it</strong>.</p>
<p>I chose one of the many <a href="http://spaceappschallenge.org/challenges/">challenges</a> proposed for the event: the <a href="http://spaceappschallenge.org/challenge/size-earth-app/">Size of Earth App</a>. The proposal involved building an application that would help people to rediscover the size of earth (inspired by what Eratosthenes did 2500 years ago, with no computer available at the time :P). I thought that knowing that Earth has 40,030.2 km of equatorial circunference, 6,371.00 km of mean radius and 5,972,190,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg of mass is one thing, but knowing what these big numbers actually mean in such a huge universe like ours is also very important.</p>
<p>So I joined Bruno Fernandes and Samanta do Amaral, two wonderful filmmakers, on a last-minute team. And this is where we got to:</p>
@@ -27,7 +26,7 @@
<p>So here you have a tutorial on how to make your own play-doh planets (or anything else you want mixing open data and play-doh):</p>
- <p><h3><a href="data.html">Step 1: How to find, get and use the open spacial data you need</a></h3></p>
+ <p><h3><a href="data.html">Step 1: How to find, get and use the open spatial data you need</a></h3></p>
<p><h3><a href="playdoh.html">Step 2: How to make play-doh</a></h3></p>

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