Simpler Python date handling
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README.rst
paodate.py
setup.py

README.rst

Pao Date Tools

Utilities for making date and time handling in Python easy. This is mainly accomplished with the new Date and Delta objects which abstract most of the differences between datetime, date, time, timedelta, and relativedelta, allowing you to convert freely between all of them and providing useful utility methods.

Please note that examples on this page assume a timezone of UTC+1 (Europe/Amsterdam), as is set before running the unit tests so that all times are in a common timezone, otherwise the tests would all be off by some number of hours depending on your local timezone.

Some quick examples:

>>> from paodate import Date
>>> Date(1234567890).datetime
datetime.datetime(2009, 2, 14, 0, 31, 30)
>>> d = Date(datetime(2004, 1, 12))
>>> d.day += 10
>>> d
Date(2004-01-22, 00:00:00)
>>> d.friendly
'22 Jan 2004'
>>> d.sql
"'2004-01-22 00:00:00'"
>>> d.month_tuple
(Date(2004-01-01, 00:00:00), Date(2004-01-31, 23:59:59))
>>> delta = Date(1234567890) - d
>>> delta
Delta(5 years, 1 month, 4 days, 23 hours, 31 minutes, 30 seconds)
>>> delta.total_seconds
160702290.0

Constructors

Date objects can be created from just about anything you might want, including Python datetime and date objects, struct_time objects, numbers, lists, tuples, and strings (which require an extra format parameter):

>>> Date()
# This will be right now in local time on your system
>>> Date(1234567890)
Date(2009-02-14 00:31:30)
>>> Date(datetime(2009, 2, 14, 0, 31, 30))
Date(2009-02-14 00:31:30)
>>> Date(date(2009, 2, 14))
Date(2009-02-14 00:00:00)
>>> Date(time.localtime(1234567890))
Date(2009-02-14 00:31:30)
>>> Date((2009, 2, 14, 0, 31, 30))
Date(2009-02-14, 00:31:30)
>>> Date("2009.02.14 at 00:31:30", format="%Y.%m.%d at %H:%M:%S")
Date(2009-02-14, 00:31:30)

You can also construct a Date object in the past (or future) by passing in the modification type and amount:

>>> d = Date(months_ago=3)
# This will be three months ago from today in local time
>>> d = Date(years_ago=1, months_ago=2, days_ago=-5)
# One year and two months ago from five days in the future from today

Conversion

Converting a Date object to any representation you might need is incredibly simple:

>>> d = Date(1234567890)
>>> d.datetime
datetime.datetime(2009, 2, 14, 0, 31, 30)
>>> d.date
datetime.date(2009, 2, 14)
>>> d.time
datetime.time(0, 31, 30)
>>> d.tuple
time.struct_time(tm_year=2009, tm_mon=2, tm_mday=14, tm_hour=0, tm_min=31,
                 tm_sec=30, tm_wday=5, tm_yday=45, tm_isdst=-1)
>>> d.timestamp
1234567890

It is also possible to convert an existing Date object to UTC (this essentially removes time zone information after adjusting by the local offset):

>>> d.utc
Date(2009-02-13, 23:31:30)

Component Access

All date and time components of the Date object may be read and written to. When writing to the components it is good practice to never use absolute values and instead use the += and -= operators, as setting negative component values can have unintended effects.

>>> d = Date(1234567890)
>>> d
Date(2009-02-14, 00:31:30)
>>> d.day += 5
>>> d
Date(2009-02-19, 00:31:30)
>>> print d.year, d.month, d.day, d.hour, d.minute, d.second, d.microsecond
2009, 2, 19, 0, 31, 30, 0
>>> d.year -= 3
>>> d
Date(2006-02-19, 00:31:30)

It's also possible to quickly add / subtract all the components except microseconds at once or to daisy-chain such operations:

>>> d.add(years=-2, days=13, minutes=5)
# Subtract two years, add 13 days and 5 minutes
>>> d = Date().start_of_month.add(days=-3)
# Get the date and time three days before the start of the current month

The number of days in the current month is also built-in:

>>> d.days_in_month
28

Getting whether this date is in the past or future is easy as well:

>>> d.is_past_date
True
>>> d.is_today
False
>>> d.is_future_date
False

Addition and subtraction of Date objects is also somewhat possible. Addition is possible between a Date and Delta or datetime.timedelta, and subtraction is possible between Date objects and a Date and a Delta or datetime.timedelta:

>>> d = Date(1234567890)
>>> d2 = Date(1234567900)
>>> delta = d2 - d
>>> delta
Delta(10 seconds)
>>> d + delta
Date(2009-02-14, 00:31:40)

Relevant Adjacent Dates and Ranges

Many times in an application you need to get the current month, or the current day for queries such as all posts from today, the amount to charge a customer for this month, etc. The Date object has all these useful ranges built-in, and they all return new Date objects which you can then convert as you see fit.

>>> d = Date(1234567890)
>>> d
Date(2009-02-14, 00:31:30)
>>> d.start_of_day
Date(2009-02-14, 00:00:00)
>>> d.end_of_day
Date(2009-02-14, 23:59:59)
>>> d.day_tuple
(Date(2009-02-14, 00:00:00), Date(2009-02-14, 23:59:59))
>>> [x.timestamp for x in d.day_tuple]
[1234501200, 1234587599]
>>> d.week_tuple
(Date(2009-02-09, 00:00:00), Date(2009-02-15, 23:59:59))
>>> d.start_of_month
Date(2009-02-01, 00:00:00)
>>> d.month_tuple
(Date(2009-02-01, 00:00:00), Date(2009-02-28, 23:59:59))
>>> d.end_of_year
Date(2009-12-31, 23:59:59)
>>> d.year_tuple
(Date(2009-01-01, 00:00:00), Date(2009-12-31, 23:59:59))

Representation

The following useful representations are built into the Date object:

>>> d = Date(1234567890)
>>> d.friendly
'14 Feb 2009'
>>> d.fancy
'February 14th, 2009'
>>> d.fancy_no_year
'February 14th'
>>> d.sql
'2009-02-14 00:31:30'
>>> d.sql_date
'2009-02-14'
>>> d.sql_time
'00:31:30'
>>> d.strftime("%Y-%m-%d")
'2009-02-14'

Differences Between Dates

The following examples show how to use the new Delta object with Date objects:

>>> d1 = Date(1234567890)
>>> d2 = Date(1234560000)
>>> delta = d1 - d2
>>> delta
Delta(2 hours, 11 minutes, 30 seconds)
>>> delta.timedelta
datetime.timedelta(0, 7890)
>>> delta.total_seconds
7890.0
>>> round(delta.total_hours)
2.0
>>> delta.friendly
'2 hours, 11 minutes, 30 seconds'
>>> delta.days = 5
>>> delta
Delta(5 days, 2 hours, 11 minutes, 30 seconds)
>>> d2 + delta
Date(2009-02-18, 22:31:30)
>>> (d2 + delta) - d1
Delta(5 days)

Please take a look at the well-documented paodate.py file for more information.

Usage

Import the paodate.py file into your project and use the Date and Delta objects.

Requirements

The only requirement for this module is Python. Running this script will invoke all unit tests so you can see that everything works for your installation.

Authors & Contributors

Patches are very welcome upstream, so feel free to fork and push your changes back up! The following people have worked on this project:

License

This module is free software, released under the terms of the Python Software Foundation License version 2, which can be found here:

http://www.python.org/psf/license/