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Browne Garden Commonplace Book #158

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spenteco opened this Issue Nov 15, 2015 · 12 comments

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@spenteco

spenteco commented Nov 15, 2015

If you're like me, you spend far too much time pondering the question first asked by Sir Thomas Browne: "Why Joseph designed five changes of Rayment unto Benjamin?" It is so much a Question Biblical as a Question Numerical. Why Five? And what about the other Eleven; isn't their nakedness as in need of covering as the One?

I suppose it's a matter for Literary Measurement, an occasion to heed Henry Thomas Riley's insistence that, "The Pythagorean philosophy was well-suited for the purpose of mingling its doctrines with the fabulous narratives of the Poet, as it consisted, in great part, of the doctrine of an endless series of transformations."

But just as Gardens subsist in circles and rectangles, so must poetry move in orthogonal decussations, drawing a latticed net-work of text, as Riley suggests: "The Poet having now exhausted nearly all the transformations . . . afforded him, proceeds to enlist in the number some of the real phenomena of nature, together with some imaginary ones." Queue the Chairman, baby!

@MichaelPaulukonis

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MichaelPaulukonis commented Nov 16, 2015

We are all naked in the Garden, and Dreaming of Eden.

@greg-kennedy

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greg-kennedy commented Nov 19, 2015

What. the

@MichaelPaulukonis

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MichaelPaulukonis commented Nov 19, 2015

Haven't you heard? We're DADA 2.0, baby! Sense and Sensibility has been thrown out with the baby (unless it's being used as a source-text) and Esther Williams has taken over the bath-water for a routine that makes Busby Berkely look like a poorly-coded sequence of n-grams.

Although Mr. @spenteco is more Spenserian, and I was referencing certain pecadillios of one Mr. Wm. Blake (& wife)*.

* See here (scroll down for a tale told by an apropriately-named Mr. Butts).

@spenteco

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spenteco commented Nov 19, 2015

This list is full of cut-ups.

@spenteco spenteco closed this Nov 19, 2015

@MichaelPaulukonis

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MichaelPaulukonis commented Nov 20, 2015

No code no mo, spenteco?

@spenteco

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spenteco commented Nov 22, 2015

Thanks for commenting, Michael. Sincerely--I didn't realized that I had closed this. I've been working the last several days until I'm completely groggy. I really hope I haven't fat-fingered anything important.

I'm pushing my content to PDF today, and I plan on writing my README's and pushing to github and my webhost tomorrow. So, unless I've done anything else unwittingly, the end is in sight.

@spenteco spenteco reopened this Nov 22, 2015

@spenteco

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@greg-kennedy

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greg-kennedy commented Nov 23, 2015

Whoa.

On Sunday, November 22, 2015, Stephen Pentecost notifications@github.com
wrote:

PDF is up:

http://montaukedp.com/Brownes_Garden_Commonplace_Book.pdf


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#158 (comment)
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@MichaelPaulukonis

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MichaelPaulukonis commented Nov 23, 2015

a oh Whoa, indeed.

@hugovk

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hugovk commented Nov 23, 2015

Ooh!

Don't forget the code to claim a completed label.

@hugovk hugovk added the completed label Nov 23, 2015

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hugovk commented Nov 23, 2015

Great!

Nice mix in the repo: HTML, Python, JavaScript, CSS, PHP!

I don't have the right images, either for sprinkling through the text or for introducing the major sections of the work.

I'm quite pleased with the effect I get with Twitterbot @thenewharperlee. For a word from the title, it fetches the most relevant public domain image from https://flickr.com/internetarchivebookimages -- which often aren't the most relevant but I like the results.

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