New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Fake press coverage of NaNoGenMo: a novel #159

Open
enkiv2 opened this Issue Nov 16, 2015 · 3 comments

Comments

Projects
None yet
4 participants
@tra38

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@tra38

tra38 Nov 16, 2015

Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Computer Scientist Mark Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from last month in The Verge.

While the computer does not care what lines it prints out, this following paragraph 'flows' and make sense. Of course, you had to generate hundreds of paragraphs that made less sense...in order to get this one paragraph that made sense.

Consider the following near-future: Journalists stop writing entirely. "Journalists" instead proudly call themselves "editors" and "content curators", out to make sense of a insane world. Their 'best practices' are the following:

  1. Write code that takes information from a corpus (or use an open-source program to generate the code for them).
  2. Generate 50,000 words of nonsense, from said corpus.
  3. Read through the nonsense to find something interesting.
  4. Copy and paste.

Whether that future is dystopian (jobs are going away, writing loses meaning) or utopian (symbiosis of man and machine) depends on your thoughts about automation in general.

tra38 commented Nov 16, 2015

Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Computer Scientist Mark Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from last month in The Verge.

While the computer does not care what lines it prints out, this following paragraph 'flows' and make sense. Of course, you had to generate hundreds of paragraphs that made less sense...in order to get this one paragraph that made sense.

Consider the following near-future: Journalists stop writing entirely. "Journalists" instead proudly call themselves "editors" and "content curators", out to make sense of a insane world. Their 'best practices' are the following:

  1. Write code that takes information from a corpus (or use an open-source program to generate the code for them).
  2. Generate 50,000 words of nonsense, from said corpus.
  3. Read through the nonsense to find something interesting.
  4. Copy and paste.

Whether that future is dystopian (jobs are going away, writing loses meaning) or utopian (symbiosis of man and machine) depends on your thoughts about automation in general.

@ikarth

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@ikarth

ikarth Nov 16, 2015

Whether that future is dystopian (jobs are going away, writing loses meaning) or utopian (symbiosis of man and machine) depends on your thoughts about automation in general.

I love how this one book says something about journalism, clickbait, automation, and the human condition, mostly through its processes rather than the individual output per se.

ikarth commented Nov 16, 2015

Whether that future is dystopian (jobs are going away, writing loses meaning) or utopian (symbiosis of man and machine) depends on your thoughts about automation in general.

I love how this one book says something about journalism, clickbait, automation, and the human condition, mostly through its processes rather than the individual output per se.

@enkiv2

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@enkiv2

enkiv2 Nov 16, 2015

Just like how in Montfort's 1k generators the evocative sentences are
essentially randomly chosen, all the quotes in the articles are real quotes
that are just chosen and placed randomly. It's sort of surprising that so
many of these collections of quotes seem to follow each other and make
sense, since they were taken from different articles and interviews, and
since more than half of Hugo's are about meow.py.

On Mon, Nov 16, 2015 at 12:46 PM Isaac Karth notifications@github.com
wrote:

Whether that future is dystopian (jobs are going away, writing loses
meaning) or utopian (symbiosis of man and machine) depends on your thoughts
about automation in general.

I love how this one book says something about journalism, clickbait,
automation, and the human condition, mostly through its processes rather
than the individual output per se.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#159 (comment)
.

enkiv2 commented Nov 16, 2015

Just like how in Montfort's 1k generators the evocative sentences are
essentially randomly chosen, all the quotes in the articles are real quotes
that are just chosen and placed randomly. It's sort of surprising that so
many of these collections of quotes seem to follow each other and make
sense, since they were taken from different articles and interviews, and
since more than half of Hugo's are about meow.py.

On Mon, Nov 16, 2015 at 12:46 PM Isaac Karth notifications@github.com
wrote:

Whether that future is dystopian (jobs are going away, writing loses
meaning) or utopian (symbiosis of man and machine) depends on your thoughts
about automation in general.

I love how this one book says something about journalism, clickbait,
automation, and the human condition, mostly through its processes rather
than the individual output per se.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#159 (comment)
.

Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment