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A fork of the geocoding library geopy. Returns accuracy scores. Allows viewport biasing.

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Octocat-spinner-32 geopy
Octocat-spinner-32 .gitignore
Octocat-spinner-32 LICENSE
Octocat-spinner-32 README.textile
Octocat-spinner-32 requirements.txt
Octocat-spinner-32 setup.py
README.textile

This library is no longer supported and probably should not be used. If you would like to access Google’s v3 geocoder with Python, try python-googlegeocoder.

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A fork of the geocoding library geopy, modified, with a few new toys.

Includes:

  • An option to return an accuracy score along with the result

How it works

First fire up geopy and load the Google geocoder like you normally would.

$ python
>>> from geopy import geocoders
>>> g = geocoders.Google(BENS_GOOGLE_API_KEY)

Now run an address like you typically would and see the usual output. Let’s try the address of the Los Angeles Times.

>>> point_generator = g.geocode('202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA', exactly_one=False)
>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> pprint(list(point_generator))
[(u'202 W 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90731, USA',
  (33.743286099999999, -118.28143780000001)),
 (u'202 W 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90012, USA',
  (34.052993000000001, -118.24482500000001))]

Unfortunately, we get two results in LA for the same address. Let’s use my new optional keyword argument, ‘return_accuracy’ so see how good they are.

>>> point_generator = g.geocode('202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA', exactly_one=False, return_accuracy=True)

You’ll see that the generator now includes the accuracy score at the tail end. You can decode the number here. Eight is pretty good.

>>> pprint(list(point_generator))
[(u'202 W 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90731, USA',
  (33.743286099999999, -118.28143780000001),
  u'8'),
 (u'202 W 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90012, USA',
  (34.052993000000001, -118.24482500000001),
  u'8')]

But they’re both at the same high accuracy level. Why? Because that address occurs both in Downtown L.A. and in the long-ago annexed neighborhood of San Pedro.

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