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[Data]nymizer

datanymizer

Build Status License Release Version CodeCov

Powerful database anonymizer with flexible rules. Written in Rust.

Datanymizer is created & supported by Evrone. See what else we develop with Rust.

More information you can find in articles in English and Russian.

How it works

Database -> Dumper (+Faker) -> Dump.sql

You can import or process your dump with supported database without 3rd-party importers.

Datanymizer generates database-native dump.

Installation

There are several ways to install pg_datanymizer, choose a more convenient option for you.

Pre-compiled binary

# Linux / macOS / Windows (MINGW and etc). Installs it into ./bin/ by default
$ curl -sSfL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/datanymizer/datanymizer/main/cli/pg_datanymizer/install.sh | sh -s

# Or more shorter way
$ curl -sSfL https://git.io/pg_datanymizer | sh -s

# Specify installation directory and version
$ curl -sSfL https://git.io/pg_datanymizer | sh -s -- -b usr/local/bin v0.2.0

# Alpine Linux (wget)
$ wget -q -O - https://git.io/pg_datanymizer | sh -s

Homebrew / Linuxbrew

# Installs the latest stable release
$ brew install datanymizer/tap/pg_datanymizer

# Builds the latest version from the repository
$ brew install --HEAD datanymizer/tap/pg_datanymizer

Docker

$ docker run --rm -v `pwd`:/app -w /app datanymizer/pg_datanymizer

Getting started with CLI dumper

First, inspect your database schema, choose fields with sensitive data, and create a config file based on it.

# config.yml
tables:
  - name: markets
    rules:
      name_translations:
        template:
          format: '{"en": "{{_1}}", "ru": "{{_2}}"}'
          rules:
            - words:
                min: 1
                max: 2
            - words:
                min: 1
                max: 2
  - name: franchisees
    rules:
      operator_mail:
        template:
          format: user-{{_1}}-{{_2}}
          rules:
            - random_num: {}
            - email:
                kind: Safe
      operator_name:
        first_name: {}
      operator_phone:
        phone:
          format: +###########
      name_translations:
        template:
          format: '{"en": "{{_1}}", "ru": "{{_2}}"}'
          rules:
            - words:
                min: 2
                max: 3
            - words:
                min: 2
                max: 3
  - name: users
    rules:
      first_name:
        first_name: {}
      last_name:
        last_name: {}
  - name: customers
    rules:
      email:
        template:
          format: user-{{_1}}-{{_2}}
          rules:
            - random_num: {}
            - email:
                kind: Safe
                uniq:  
                  required: true
                  try_count: 5
      phone:
        phone:
          format: +7##########
          uniq: true
      city:
        city: {}
      age:
        random_num:
          min: 10
          max: 99
      first_name:
        first_name: {}
      last_name:
        last_name: {}
      birth_date:
        datetime:
          from: 1990-01-01T00:00:00+00:00
          to: 2010-12-31T00:00:00+00:00

And then start to make dump from your database instance:

pg_datanymizer -f /tmp/dump.sql -c ./config.yml postgres://postgres:postgres@localhost/test_database

It creates new dump file /tmp/dump.sql with native SQL dump for Postgresql database. You can import fake data from this dump into new Postgresql database with command:

psql -U postgres -d new_database < /tmp/dump.sql

Dumper can stream dump to STDOUT like pg_dump and you can use it in other pipelines:

pg_datanymizer -c ./config.yml postgres://postgres:postgres@localhost/test_database > /tmp/dump.sql

Additional options

Tables filter

You can specify which tables you choose or ignore for making dump.

For dumping only public.markets and public.users data.

# config.yml
#...
filter:
  only:
    - public.markets
    - public.users

For ignoring those tables and dump data from others.

# config.yml
#...
filter:
  except:
    - public.markets
    - public.users

You can also specify data and schema filters separately.

This is equivalent to the previous example.

# config.yml
#...
filter:
  data:
    except:
      - public.markets
      - public.users

For skipping schema and data from other tables.

# config.yml
#...
filter:
  schema:
    only:
      - public.markets
      - public.users

For skipping schema for markets table and dumping data only from users table.

# config.yml
#...
filter:
  data:
    only:
      - public.users
  schema:
    except:
      - public.markets

Dump conditions and limit

You can specify conditions (SQL WHERE statement) and limit for dumped data per table:

# config.yml
tables:
  - name: people
    query:
      # don't dump some rows
      dump_condition: "last_name <> 'Sensitive'"
      # select maximum 100 rows
      limit: 100 

Transform conditions and limit

As the additional option, you can specify SQL conditions that define which rows will be transformed (anonymized):

# config.yml
tables:
  - name: people
    query:
      # don't dump some rows
      dump_condition: "last_name <> 'Sensitive'"
      # preserve original values for some rows
      transform_condition: "NOT (first_name = 'John' AND last_name = 'Doe')"      
      # select maximum 100 rows
      limit: 100

You can use the dump_condition, transform_condition and limit options in any combination (only transform_condition; transform_condition and limit; etc).

Global variables

You can specify global variables available from any template rule.

# config.yml
tables:
  users:
    bio:
      template:
        format: "User bio is {{var_a}}"
    age:
      template:
        format: {{_0 | float * global_multiplicator}}
#...
globals:
  var_a: Global variable 1
  global_multiplicator: 6

Available rules

Rule Description
email Emails with different options
ip IP addresses. Supports IPv4 and IPv6
words Lorem words with different length
first_name First name generator
last_name Last name generator
city City names generator
phone Generate random phone with different format
pipeline Use pipeline to generate more complicated values
capitalize Like filter, it capitalizes input value
template Template engine for generate random text with included rules
digit Random digit (in range 0..9)
random_num Random number with min and max options
password Password with different
length options (support max and min options)
datetime Make DateTime strings with options (from and to)
more than 70 rules in total...

For the complete list of rules please refer this document.

Uniqueness

You can specify that result values must be unique (they are not unique by default). You can use short or full syntax.

Short:

uniq: true

Full:

uniq:
  required: true
  try_count: 5

Uniqueness is ensured by re-generating values when they are same. You can customize the number of attempts with try_count (this is an optional field, the default number of tries depends on the rule).

Currently, uniqueness is supported by: email, ip, phone, random_num.

Locales

You can specify the locale for individual rules:

first_name:
  locale: RU

The default locale is EN but you can specify a different default locale:

tables:
  # ........  
default:
  locale: RU

We also support ZH_TW (traditional chinese) and RU (translation in progress).

Referencing row values from templates

You can reference values of other row fields in templates. Use prev for original values and final - for anonymized:

tables:
  - name: some_table
    # You must specify the order of rule execution when using `final`
    rule_order:
      - greeting
      - options
    rules:
      first_name:
        first_name: {}
      greeting:
        template:
          # Keeping the first name, but anonymizing the last name   
          format: "Hello, {{ prev.first_name }} {{ final.last_name }}!"
      options:
        template:
          # Using the anonymized value again   
          format: "{greeting: \"{{ final.greeting }}\"}"

You must specify the order of rule execution when using final with rule_order. All rules not listed will be placed at the beginning (i.e. you must list only rules with final).

Sharing information between rows

We implemented a built-in key-value store that allows information to be exchanged between anonymized rows.

It is available via the special functions in templates.

Take a look at an example:

tables:
  - name: users  
    rules:
      name:
        template:    
          # Save a name to the store as a side effect, the key is `user_names.<USER_ID>` 
          format: "{{ _1 }}{{ store_write key='user_names.' ~ prev.id, value=_1 }}"
          rules:
            - person_name: {}
  - name: user_operations
    rules:
      user_name:          
        template:
          # Using the saved value again  
          format: "{{ store_read key='user_names.' ~ prev.user_id }}"

Supported databases

  • Postgresql
  • MySQL or MariaDB (TODO)

Documentation

Sponsors

Sponsored by Evrone

License

MIT