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Modern python-jsonrpc implementation, originally a mirror of jsonrpc.org
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README.md

JSON-RPC for python

This is a modern fork of the JSON-RPC implementation originally hosted on json-rpc.org. It has been updated for modern versions of Python.

jsonrpc implements the JSON-RPC 2.0 specification.

The mod_python and CGI service handlers are backwards compatible with JSON-RPC 1.0 clients.

Requirements

Python 2.6+ is natively supported. Python 2.5 requires the 'simplejson' module.

The 'simplejson' module enables some speedups not present in python2.6's 'json' module. You may want to install it if you are using python2.6.

Using the ServiceProxy class

If everything worked you should now be able to call JSON-RPC services. Open a shell and start an example server:

python examples/server.py

Start your favorite python shell and enter the code below, or use the provided examples/client.py python console.

python examples/client.py

### or

python
...
>>> from jsonrpc import ServiceProxy
>>> client = ServiceProxy('http://localhost:8080/service.py')
>>> client.echo('foobar')

The example above creates a proxy object for the example JSON-RPC server. It calls the service's echo method and shows the result of the call.

This implementation supports JSON-RPC 2.0 which means that either positional arguments or keyword arguments, but not both, are allowed.

Creating CGI based services

An example CGI server is provided in examples/server.py.

To provide your own service you can create a python CGI-Script and use jsonrpc's handleCGI method for handling requests.

#!/usr/bin/env python

from jsonrpc import handleCGI, servicemethod

@servicemethod
def echo(msg):
    return msg


if __name__ == '__main__':
    handleCGI()

This is the simplest way to create a service using a CGI script. All methods in the script decorated using the servicemethod decorator are available to remote callers. All other methods are inaccessible to the "outside world".

handleCGI() gives you some flexibility to define what to use as the service. By default, as seen above it uses the main module as a service. You can though, specify a particular service to be used by passing it to handleCGI(service) as first parameter:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from jsonrpc import handleCGI, servicemethod

class MyService(object):
    @servicemethod
    def echo(self, msg):
        return msg


if __name__ == '__main__':
    service = MyService()
    handleCGI(service)

Creating mod-python based services

Similar to the way the CGI handling works, you can use jsonrpc's mod-python handler. First you need to install and setup mod-python to handle service URLs using jsonrpc's mod-python handler. E.g. in your .htaccess file in any folder that is being served by apache add:

AddHandler mod_python .py
PythonHandler jsonrpc

Make sure Apache is setup to allow you to add the AddType Directive in .htaccess files. Alternatively you can create an apache config file which gets loaded by apache upon startup. In a Location or Directory section you should add the python handler:

Alias /services/ /var/www/json-rpc-services/
<Location /services/>
    AddHandler mod_python .py
    PythonHandler jsonrpc
</Location>

If you have not installed jsonrpc using it's setup script, you will need to add it's location to python's sys-path so that mod-python can find it. In your apache config or .htaccess file add:

...
PythonHandler jsonrpc
PythonPath "sys.path+['/path/to/where/jsorpc/package/is/located/']"

Now you need to create a python script that will be used as a service. Place it in a sub folder that is covered by the Directives above. E.g. in the folder of where .htaccess is located or a subfolder thereof or in any sub-folder of /var/www/json-rpc-services/ for the second config example.

Similar to the CGI based service you can create a script with methods decorated using the servicemethod decorator:

from jsonrpc import handleCGI, servicemethod

@servicemethod
def echo(msg):
    return msg

Again, this is probably the simplest way to create a service.

You can also create a script which exposes a service, which will then be used as the service.

from jsonrpc import servicemethod

class MyService(object):
    @servicemethod
    def echo(self, msg):
        return msg

service = MyService()

or you create a script which exposes a Service class. A service object will be created using this class and used as a service.

from jsonrpc import servicemethod

class Service(object):
    @servicemethod
    def echo(self, msg):
        return msg

Testing your services

The provided examples/client.py can be used for testing any JSON-RPC service. It connects to http://localhost:8080/service.py by default but can be told to connect to any other service by using the --url <service URL> option.

Error handling

Any error that the ServiceProxy received through the JSON-RPC protocol will be raised as a JSONRPCException before the called method returns.

The exception raised will contain a service specific error object, which can be accessed using the exception's error property.

try:
    print(s.echo('foobar'))
except JSONRPCException as e:
    print(repr(e.error))

Any exception raised in a Service's method during invokation will be converted into an error object and transmitted back to the caller by jsonrpc. The error object will use the exception's class name as a name property and it's message property as the message property of the error object being returned.

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