Digital Bond's ICS Enumeration Tools
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README.md

#Redpoint

###Digital Bond's ICS Enumeration Tools

Redpoint is a Digital Bond research project to enumerate ICS applications and devices.

We use our Redpoint tools in assessments to discover ICS devices and pull information that would be helpful in secondary testing. A portion of those tools will be made available as Nmap NSE scripts to the public in this repository.

The Redpoint tools use legitimate protocol or application commands to discover and enumerate devices and applications. There is no effort to exploit or crash anything. However many ICS devices and applications are fragile and can crash or respond in an unexpected way to any unexpected traffic so use with care.

Each script is documented below and available in a .nse file in this repository.

==

###BACnet-discover-enumerate.nse

![BACnet-discover-enumerate Sample Output] (http://digibond.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/BACnet-nse.png)

####Authors

Stephen Hilt and Michael Toecker
Digital Bond, Inc

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of BACnet-discover-enumerate.nse is to first identify if an IP connected devices is running BACnet. This works by querying the device with a pre-generated BACnet message. Newer versions of the BACnet protocol will respond with an acknowledgement, older versions will return a BACnet error message. Presence of either the acknowledgement or the error is sufficient to prove a BACnet capable device is at the target IP Address.

Second, if an acknowledgement is received, this script will also attempt to enumerate several BACnet properties on a responsive BACnet device. Again, the device is queried with a pregenerated BACnet message. Successful enumeration uses specially crafted requests, and will not be successful if the BACnet device does not support the property.

BACnet properties queried by this script are:

  1. Vendor ID - A number that corresponds to a registered BACnet Vendor. The script returns the associated vendor name as well.

  2. Vendor Number - A String that represents the Vendor Name that is configured on the device. This can differ from the Vendor ID as the Vendor ID is the Number registered with ASHARE.

  3. Object Identifier - A number that uniquely identifies the device. If the Object-Identifier is known, it is possible to send commands with BACnet client software, including those that change values, programs, schedules, and other operational information on BACnet devices. This is a required property for all BACnet devices.

  4. Firmware Revision - The revision number of the firmware on the BACnet device.

  5. Application Software Revision - The revision number of the software being used for BACnet communication.

  6. Object Name - A user defined string that assigns a name to the BACnet device, commonly entered by technicians on commissioning. This is a required property for all BACnet devices.

  7. Model Name - The model of the BACnet device

  8. Description - A user defined string for describing the device, commonly entered by technicians on commissioning

  9. Location - A user defined string for recording the physical location of the device, commonly entered by technicians on commissioning

  10. Broadcast Distribution Table (BDT) - A list of the BACnet Broadcast Management Devices (BBMD) in the BACnet network. This will identify all of the subnets that are part of the BACnet network.

  11. Foreign Device Table (FDT) - A list of foreign devices registered with the BACnet device. A foreign device is any device that is not on a subnet that is part of the BACnet network, not in the BDT. Foreign devices often are located on external networks and could be an attacker's IP address.

The BDT and FDT can be large lists and may be not desired in a large Nmap scan. The basic script will not pull down the BDT and FDT. Run the command with the --script-args full=yes to pull the BDT and FDT, see the Usage section.

![BACnet-discover-enumerate Sample Output with BDT and FDT] (http://digibond.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/screenshot_bacnet-1.png)

This script uses a feature added in 2004 to the BACnet specification in order to retrieve the Object Identifier of a device with a single request, and without joining the BACnet network as a foreign device. (See ANSI/ASHRAE Addendum a to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 135-2001 for details)

####History and Background

From Wikipedia article on BACnet http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BACnet:

BACnet is a communications protocol for building automation and control networks. It is an ASHRAE, ANSI, and ISO standard[1] protocol. The default port for BACnet traffic is UDP/47808.

BACnet is used in building automation and control systems for applications such as heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning control, lighting control, access control, and fire detection systems and their associated equipment. The BACnet protocol provides mechanisms for computerized building automation devices to exchange information, regardless of the particular building service they perform.

####Installation

This script requires nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and Install Nmap based off the Nmap instructions. http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading bacnet-discover.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move BACnet-discover-enumerate.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading BACnet-discover-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv BACnet-discover-enumerate.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where host is the target you wish you scan for BACNet. Use --script-args full=yes if you want the output to included the BDT and FDT.

Windows: nmap -sU -p 47808 --script BACnet-discover-enumerate <host>
Windows: nmap -sU -p 47808 --script BACnet-discover-enumerate --script-args full=yes <host>

Linux: sudo nmap -sU -p 47808 --script BACnet-discover-enumerate <host> 
Linux: sudo nmap -sU -p 47808 --script BACnet-discover-enumerate --script-args full=yes <host>

To speed up results by not performing DNS lookups during the scan use the -n option, also disable pings to determine if the device is up by doing a -Pn option for full results.

nmap -sU -Pn -p 47808 -n --script BACnet-discover-enumerate <host>

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at: https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/blob/master/BACnet-discover-enumerate.nse

This script uses the standard BACnet source and destination port of UDP 47808.

Newer (after February 25, 2004) BACnet devices are required by spec to respond to specific requests that use a 'catchall' object-identifier with their own valid instance number (see ANSI/ASHRAE Addendum a to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 135-2001). Older versions of BACnet devices may not respond to this catchall, and will respond with a BACnet error packet instead.

This script does not attempt to join a BACnet network as a foreign device, it simply sends BACnet requests directly to an IP addressable device.

== ###codesys-v2-discover.nse ![codesys-v2-discover Sample Output] (http://digibond.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/codesys-v2-discover-win.png)

####Authors

Stephen Hilt, Reid Wightman

####Purpose and Description

The codesys-v2-discover.nse script identifies PLCs which run the version 2 ladder logic runtime made by 3S-Software GmbH. These controllers speak a proprieaty binary protocol for installing new ladder logic, as well as debugging the running ladder logic. The protocol can require authentication. In practice, few devices support this behavior. This script does not test for authentication.

This script sends a simple request for identification to the device. The response message may include the operating system and specific point release of CoDeSys running on the PLC.

####History and Background

Digital Bond released details of the CoDeSys runtime system being insecure-by-design in April 2012. The protocol usually uses TCP/1200 or TCP/2455 as its control port. The control protocol contains functions to upload and download files from the controllers. The protocol also may provide a command shell, which offers additional functionality. Shell features typically include the ability to start and stop the currently-running ladder logic, as well as retrieve debugging information from the controller.

The initial advisory applied only to version 2 of the runtime. Digital Bond also released a proof-of-concept Nmap script, originally written by HD Moore as part of his internet-scanning project.

A Nessus script was also produced for this version of the protocol, however the Nessus script contains an error and does not properly check for controllers with big-endian CPUs.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and Install Nmap based off the Nmap instructions. http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading enip-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

    move codesys-v2-discover.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading enip-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as sudo/root.

    sudo mv codesys-v2-discover.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where is the target you wish you scan for EtherNet/IP.

    Windows: nmap -p 1200,2455 --script codesys-v2-discover <host>

    Linux: sudo nmap -p 1200,2455 --script codesys-v2-discover <host>

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/codesys-v2-discover.nse

This script will attempt to send the CoDeSys requests on any open port. While the standard ports of 1200 or 2455 are used by most controllers, some controllers use alternate ports such as 1201, 1217, and yet other ports.

== ###enip-enumerate.nse ![enip-enumerate Sample Output] (http://digibond.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/enip.png)

####Author

Stephen Hilt
Digital Bond, Inc

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of enip-enumerate.nse is to identify and enumerate EtherNet/IP devices. Rockwell Automation / Allen Bradley developed the protocol and is the primary maker of these devices, e.g. ControlLogix and MicroLogix, but it is an open standard and a number of vendors offer an EtherNet/IP interface card or solution.

An EtherNet/IP device is positively identified by querying TCP/44818 with a list Identities Message (0x63). The response messages will determine if it is a EtherNet/IP device and parse the information to enumerate the device.

The EtherNet/IP Request List Identities pulls basic information about the device known as the Device's "electronic key". Information includes Vendor, Product Name, Serial Number, Device Type, Product Code and Revision Number. Also the script parses the devices configured IP address from the Socket Address Field within the EtherNet/IP frame of the packet.

EtherNet/IP properties parsed by this script are:

  1. Vendor - A two Byte integer that is used to look up Vendor Name

  2. Product Name - A string that represents a short description of the product/product family, maximum length is 32 chars

  3. Serial Number - A six Byte Hexadecimal Number that is stored little Endian

  4. Device Type - Two byte integer that is used to look up Device type. This field is often not used and set to 0.

  5. Product Code - The vendor assigned Product Code identifies a particular product within a device type. The script does not have access to the vendor product code tables so the number is displayed.

  6. Revision - Two one-byte integers that lists the major and minor revision number of the device

  7. Device IP - Four one-byte integers that represent the device's configured IP address. This address often differs from the IP address scanned by the script.

####History and Background

From Wikipedia article on EtherNet/IP http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EtherNet/IP

EtherNet/IP was developed in the late 1990s by Rockwell Automation as part of Rockwell's industrial Ethernet networking solutions. Rockwell gave EtherNet/IP its moniker and handed it over to ODVA, which now manages the protocol and assures multi-vendor system interoperability by requiring adherence to established standards whenever new products that utilize the protocol are developed today.

EtherNet/IP is most commonly used in industrial automation control systems, such as for water processing plants, manufacturing facilities and utilities. Several control system vendors have developed programmable automation controllers and I/O capable of communicating via EtherNet/IP.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and Install Nmap based off the Nmap instructions. http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading enip-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move enip-enumerate.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading enip-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv enip-enumerate.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where is the target you wish you scan for EtherNet/IP.

Windows: nmap -p 44818 --script enip-enumerate <host>

Linux: sudo nmap -p 44818 --script enip-enumerate <host> 

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/enip-enumerate.nse

This script uses the standard Ethernet/IP destination port of TCP 44818.

==

###fox-info.nse ![fox-info Sample Output] (http://www.digitalbond.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/fox-example.png)

####Author

Stephen Hilt
Digital Bond, Inc

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of fox-info.nse is to first identify devices running the Niagara Fox protocol. This script is based off the work and examples provided by Billy Rios and Terry McCorkle.

Upon successful connection to a Niagara Fox device, the script will be parse the response sent from the device and display enumerated information.

Niagara Fox properties queried by this script are:

  1. Fox Version - The version of the Fox protocol that is currently running on the device.

  2. Host Name - The host name of the device. This usually is the workstation name of the remote device.

  3. Host Address - The IP address configured on the device. This can be the IP address scanned or a private address if the device is behind something performing network address translations(NAT).

  4. Application Name - The application name that is running on the remote device. This is typically either "Workbench" or "Station".

  5. Application Version - The version number of the application name previously enumerated.

  6. VM Name - The name of the Java Virtual Machine that is running the application.

  7. VM Version - The version number of the VM that is running on the remote device. This will be most likely the Java HotSpot Version Number.

  8. OS Name - Name of the OS running the Fox protocol on the device, e.g. QNX or Windows XP.

  9. Time Zone - The local time zone configured on the device.

  10. Host ID - a unique ID that is used to identify the device.

  11. VM UUID - The Java VM Universally Unique Identifier.

  12. Brand ID - Every licensed station and tool has a Brand Identifier. This field holds a text descriptor that the OEM chooses as the identifier for its product line. Each station or tool can have only one BrandID entry.

####History and Background

Fox is a proprietary TCP/IP protocol used for station-to-station and workbench-to-station communication in the Niagara Framework of the Tridium building automation solutions. Tridium is a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and install Nmap, see: http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading fox-info.nse, move it into the NSE Scripts directory. This move must be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move fox-info.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading fox-info.nse, move it into the NSE Scripts directory. This must be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv fox-info.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where host is the target you wish you scan for devices that support the Niagara Fox protocol.

Windows: nmap -p 1911 --script fox-info <host>
	
Linux: sudo nmap -p 1911 --script fox-info <host> 

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at: https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/blob/master/fox-info.nse

This script uses the standard Niagara Fox source and destination port of TCP 1911.

==

###modicon-info.nse ![modicon-info sample output] (http://www.digitalbond.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Modicon.png)

####Author

Stephen Hilt
Digital Bond, Inc

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of modicon-info.nse is to first identify and enumerate Modicon PLC's made by Schneider Electric.

The script first identifies if an IP connected device is sending a Modbus function code 43 request. The response is sufficient to identify Modbus devices even if they do not support function code 43. If the response vendor name contains the string Schneider, the script will enumerate the device using the Schneider Electric proprietary Modbus function code 90.

Modbus function code 43 and function code 90 properties that are included in the script output are:

  1. Vendor Name - This script will ignore all devices that do not contain "Schneider".

  2. Network Module - The Ethernet communications module in the Modicon PLC.

  3. CPU Module - The CPU module in the Modicon PLC.

  4. Firmware - The firmware version on the CPU module in the Modicon PLC.

  5. Memory Card - The model number of the memory card in the CPU module.

  6. Project Information - Miscellaneous information about the project, such as the project name, the version of Unity Pro that was used to configure it, as well as the workstation name that programmed the PLC. Some Devices will provide the location of the .stu file on the workstation that configured the device.

  7. Project Revision - The revision of the project running on the PLC, the project revision number increments by 1 each time a the project is built, and transferred to the PLC.

  8. Project Last Modified Date - A time stamp that is stored for when the last time the PLC was modified by a technician.

####History and Background

From Wikipedia article on Programmable Logic Controllers http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Programmable_logic_controller#History:

In 1968 GM Hydra-Matic (the automatic transmission division of General Motors) issued a request for proposals for an electronic replacement for hard-wired relay systems based on a white paper written by engineer Edward R. Clark. The winning proposal came from Bedford Associates of Bedford, Massachusetts. The first PLC, designated the 084 because it was Bedford Associates' eighty-fourth project, was the result.[2] Bedford Associates started a new company dedicated to developing, manufacturing, selling, and servicing this new product: Modicon, which stood for MOdular DIgital CONtroller. One of the people who worked on that project was Dick Morley, who is considered to be the "father" of the PLC.[3] The Modicon brand was sold in 1977 to Gould Electronics, and later acquired by German Company AEG and then by French Schneider Electric, the current owner.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and install Nmap.

http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading modicon-info.nse, move it into the NSE Scripts directory. This will require Administrator privileges. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move modicon-info.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After downloading modicon-info.nse, move it into the NSE Scripts directory. This will have to be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv modicon-info.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where is the target you wish you scan for Modicon PLCs.

Windows: nmap -p 502 --script modicon-info.nse -sV <host>

Linux: sudo nmap -p 502 --script modicon-info.nse -sV <host> 

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/modicon-info.nse

This script uses the standard Modbus destination port of TCP 502.

== ###omrontcp-info.nse & omronudp-info.nse ![omrontcp/udp-info Sample Output] (http://www.digitalbond.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Region.png)

####Author

Stephen Hilt
Digital Bond, Inc

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of omrontcp-info and omronudp-info is to identify and enumerate OMRON FINS devices. Omron develed the protocol and is the primary maker of the devices that support this protocol.

An OMRON FINS device is positively identified by querying TCP/9600 or UDP 9600 with a Read Controller Satus (0x0501). The response messages will determine if it is a OMRON FINS device device and parse the information to enumerate the device.

The OMRONS FINS Read Controller Status pulls basic information about the devie such as Controller Model, Controller Version, Program area size, IOM size, No. of DM Words, Timer/Counter size, Expansion DMZ size, No. of steps/transitions, Kind of memory card and memory card size.

OMRON FINS properties parsed by this script are:

  1. Controller Model - A string no larger than 20 bytes that represents the Controller Model

  2. Controller Version - A string to represent a version number that is no larger than 20 bytes.

  3. For System Use - Reserved for system use. Collecting Information just to see if there is anything intresting in this field

  4. Program area size - The size of PC Setup and program area.

  5. IOM size - The size of the area in which bit/word commands can be used.

  6. No. of DM words - Total words in the DM area.

  7. Timer/counter size - Maximum no. of timers/counters available.

  8. Expansion DM size - Banks in the expansion DM area

  9. No. of steps/transitions - Maximum no. of steps/transitions available

  10. Kind of memory card - 00: No memory card 01: SPRAM 02: EPROM 03: EEPROM

  11. Memory card size - Size of the memory card in Kb

####History and Background

FINS or Factory Intelligent Network Services is a protocol that utlizes commands to communicate to PLCs. The protocol supports a version over UDP as well as a version over TCP. There are some differences on the two protocols thats why two scripts are written to support scanning both TCP and UDP services.

OMRON FINS is used in industrial automation control systems, such as for water processing plants, manufacturing facilities and utilities.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and Install Nmap based off the Nmap instructions. http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading enip-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move omron*.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading enip-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv omron*.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where is the target you wish you scan for OMRON FINS.

Windows: nmap -p 9600 --script omrontcp-info <host> 
Windows: nmap -sU -p 9600 --script omronudp-info <host>

Linux: nmap -p 9600 --script omrontcp-info <host> 
Linux: sudo nmap -sU -p 9600 --script omronudp-info <host>

####Notes

The official TCP version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/omrontcp-info.nse

The official UDP version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/omronudp-info.nse

These scripts use the standard FINS and TCP/FINS destination port of UDP 9600 and TCP 9600.

== ###pcworx-info.nse ![pcworx-info Sample Output] (http://www.digitalbond.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/pcworx.png)

####Author

Stephen Hilt
Digital Bond, Inc

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of pcworx-info.nse is to identify and enumerate Phoenix Contact ILC PLCs via the PC Worx protocol. A PLC is positively identified by querying TCP/1962 with pre-generated requests. The response messages will determine if it is a PC Worx capable PLC and lead to additional enumeration.

In total three packets will be sent to the PLC with this script to build up the communications and then to request the information from the PLC.

PC Worx properties parsed by this script are:

  1. PLC Type - A string that represents the ILC PLC Type.

  2. Model Number - A string of ASCII numbers that represents the Model of the PLC Such as a 2737193.

  3. Firmware Version - A string that represents the Firmware version running on the PLC.

  4. Firmware Date - A string that represents the build date of the Firmware running on the PLC.

  5. Firmware Time - A string that represents the build time of the Firmware running on the PLC.

####History and Background

From Phoenix Contact product webpage Link

PC Worx is the consistent engineering software for all controllers from Phoenix Contact. It combines programming - according to IEC 61131, fieldbus configuration and system diagnostics – in a single software solution. This provides optimum interaction between hardware and software. PC Worx can be used to implement complex automation concepts. Depending on the number of I/Os to be supported, you have two versions to choose from: PC WORX BASIC and PC WORX PRO.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and Install Nmap based off the Nmap instructions. http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading pcworx-info.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move pcworx-info.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading pcworx-info.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv pcworx-info.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where is the target you wish you scan for Phoenix Contact PLCs.

Windows: nmap -p 1962 --script pcworx-info -sV <host>

Linux: nmap -p 1962 --script pcworx-info -sV <host> 

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/pcworx-info.nse

This script uses the standard PC Worx destination port of TCP 1962.

==

###proconos-info.nse ![proconos-info Sample Output] (http://www.digitalbond.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/pcworx.png)

####Author

Stephen Hilt
Digital Bond, Inc

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of proconos-info.nse is to identify and enumerate PLCs via the ProConOS/MultiProg protocol. A PLC is positively identified by querying TCP/20547 with pre-generated requests. The response messages will determine if it is a ProConOS/MultiProg Capbable PLC and lead to additional enumeration.

Only one request is required to query this information from the PLC.

ProConOS/MultiProg properties parsed by this script are:

  1. Ladder Logic Runtime - A string that displayes the Runtime Name, Verison and Build Date.

  2. PLC Type - A string of that represents the Type of the PLC, and Firmware Version

  3. Project Name - A string that represents the project name that is currently running on the PLC.

  4. Boot Project - A string that represents the project name set to boot on the PLC.

  5. Project Source Code - A string that represents if the source code for the project is available or not.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and Install Nmap based off the Nmap instructions. http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading proconos-info.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move proconos-info.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading proconos-info.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv proconos-info.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where is the target you wish you scan for ProConOS/MultiProg PLCs.

Windows: nmap -p 20547 --script proconos-info -sV <host>

Linux: nmap -p 20547 --script proconos-info -sV <host> 

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/proconos-info.nse

This script uses the standard ProConOS/MultiProg destination port of TCP 20547.

==

###s7-enumerate.nse ![s7-enumerate Sample Output] (http://digibond.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/S7screenshot.png)

####Author

Stephen Hilt
Digital Bond, Inc

Note: This script is meant to provide the same functionality as PLCScan inside of Nmap. Some of the information that is collected by PLCScan was not ported over to this NSE, this information can be parsed out of the packets that are received.

Thanks to Positive Research, and Dmitry Efanov for creating PLCScan

####Purpose and Description

The purpose of s7-enumerate.nse is to identify and enumerate Siemens SIMATIC S7 PLCs. A S7 is positively identified by querying TCP/102 with a pre-generated COTP and S7COMM messages. The response messages will determine if it is a S7 PLC and lead to additional enumeration. Note: TCP/102 is used by multiple applications, one being S7COMM.

Two S7 requests are sent after successful S7 communication has been established.

These requests pull basic hardware, firmware information, and some descriptive information such as plant identification and system name. This information is then returned to Nmap and presented in standard output formats supported by Nmap.

S7 properties parsed by this script are:

  1. Module - A string that represents the identification of the module that is being queried. This identifies the S7 model, e.g. 315, 412, 1200, ...

  2. Basic Hardware - A string that represents the identification of basic hardware that is being queried.

  3. Version - A string that represents the identification of the basic hardware version.

  4. System Name - A string that represents the system name that was given to the device. This can provide some useful intelligence if the asset owner had implemented a structured naming convention.

  5. Module Type - A string that is the module type name of the inserted module.

  6. Serial Number - A string that is the serial number of module. This is primarily of interest for inventory purposes.

  7. Copyright - A string that is the copyright information. This usually reads "Original Siemens Equipment", but it is possible a third party implementation of the S7 protocol stack could provide additional information.

  8. Plant Identification - A string that represents the plant identification that is configured on the device. This string has rarely been seen in our scanning, but it could provide useful intelligence.

####History and Background

From Wikipedia article on SIMATIC http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIMATIC:

SIMATIC is the name of an automation system which was developed by the German company Siemens. The automation system controls machines used for industrial production. This system makes it possible for machines to run automatically.

####Installation

This script requires Nmap to run. If you do not have Nmap download and Install Nmap based off the Nmap instructions. http://nmap.org/download.html

#####Windows

After downloading s7-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as an administrator. Go to Start -> Programs -> Accessories, and right click on 'Command Prompt'. Select 'Run as Administrator'.

move s7-enumerate.nse C:\Program Files (x86)\Nmap\scripts

#####Linux

After Downloading s7-enumerate.nse you'll need to move it into the NSE Scripts directory, this will have to be done as sudo/root.

sudo mv s7-enumerate.nse /usr/share/nmap/scripts

####Usage

Inside a Terminal Window/Command Prompt use one of the following commands where is the target you wish you scan for S7 PLCs.

Windows: nmap -p 102 --script s7-enumerate -sV <host>

Linux: sudo nmap -p 102 --script s7-enumerate -sV <host> 

####Notes

The official version of this script is maintained at:https://github.com/digitalbond/Redpoint/s7-enumerate.nse

This script uses the standard S7COMMS destination port of TCP 102.