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add missing imports to the examples in the 'Forms'

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commit 08b501e7d314e9c45dd51d3ba27b2ecb0287df3b 1 parent 1d54394
@LeaFin LeaFin authored sspross committed
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1  docs/ref/contrib/formtools/form-preview.txt
@@ -53,6 +53,7 @@ How to use ``FormPreview``
overrides the ``done()`` method::
from django.contrib.formtools.preview import FormPreview
+ from django.http import HttpResponseRedirect
from myapp.models import SomeModel
class SomeModelFormPreview(FormPreview):
View
101 docs/ref/forms/api.txt
@@ -154,6 +154,7 @@ you include ``initial`` when instantiating the ``Form``, then the latter
at the field level and at the form instance level, and the latter gets
precedence::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> class CommentForm(forms.Form):
... name = forms.CharField(initial='class')
... url = forms.URLField()
@@ -238,6 +239,7 @@ When the ``Form`` is valid, ``cleaned_data`` will include a key and value for
fields. In this example, the data dictionary doesn't include a value for the
``nick_name`` field, but ``cleaned_data`` includes it, with an empty value::
+ >>> from django.forms import Form
>>> class OptionalPersonForm(Form):
... first_name = CharField()
... last_name = CharField()
@@ -327,54 +329,54 @@ a form object, and each rendering method returns a Unicode object.
.. method:: Form.as_p
- ``as_p()`` renders the form as a series of ``<p>`` tags, with each ``<p>``
- containing one field::
+``as_p()`` renders the form as a series of ``<p>`` tags, with each ``<p>``
+containing one field::
- >>> f = ContactForm()
- >>> f.as_p()
- u'<p><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></p>\n<p><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></p>\n<p><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="text" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></p>\n<p><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></p>'
- >>> print(f.as_p())
- <p><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></p>
- <p><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></p>
- <p><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></p>
- <p><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></p>
+ >>> f = ContactForm()
+ >>> f.as_p()
+ u'<p><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></p>\n<p><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></p>\n<p><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="text" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></p>\n<p><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></p>'
+ >>> print(f.as_p())
+ <p><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></p>
+ <p><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></p>
+ <p><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></p>
+ <p><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></p>
``as_ul()``
~~~~~~~~~~~
.. method:: Form.as_ul
- ``as_ul()`` renders the form as a series of ``<li>`` tags, with each
- ``<li>`` containing one field. It does *not* include the ``<ul>`` or
- ``</ul>``, so that you can specify any HTML attributes on the ``<ul>`` for
- flexibility::
+``as_ul()`` renders the form as a series of ``<li>`` tags, with each
+``<li>`` containing one field. It does *not* include the ``<ul>`` or
+``</ul>``, so that you can specify any HTML attributes on the ``<ul>`` for
+flexibility::
- >>> f = ContactForm()
- >>> f.as_ul()
- u'<li><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></li>\n<li><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></li>\n<li><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></li>\n<li><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></li>'
- >>> print(f.as_ul())
- <li><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></li>
- <li><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></li>
- <li><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></li>
- <li><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></li>
+ >>> f = ContactForm()
+ >>> f.as_ul()
+ u'<li><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></li>\n<li><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></li>\n<li><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></li>\n<li><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></li>'
+ >>> print(f.as_ul())
+ <li><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label> <input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></li>
+ <li><label for="id_message">Message:</label> <input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></li>
+ <li><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label> <input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></li>
+ <li><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label> <input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></li>
``as_table()``
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.. method:: Form.as_table
- Finally, ``as_table()`` outputs the form as an HTML ``<table>``. This is
- exactly the same as ``print``. In fact, when you ``print`` a form object,
- it calls its ``as_table()`` method behind the scenes::
+Finally, ``as_table()`` outputs the form as an HTML ``<table>``. This is
+exactly the same as ``print``. In fact, when you ``print`` a form object,
+it calls its ``as_table()`` method behind the scenes::
- >>> f = ContactForm()
- >>> f.as_table()
- u'<tr><th><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label></th><td><input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></td></tr>\n<tr><th><label for="id_message">Message:</label></th><td><input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></td></tr>\n<tr><th><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label></th><td><input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></td></tr>\n<tr><th><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label></th><td><input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></td></tr>'
- >>> print(f.as_table())
- <tr><th><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label></th><td><input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></td></tr>
- <tr><th><label for="id_message">Message:</label></th><td><input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></td></tr>
- <tr><th><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label></th><td><input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></td></tr>
- <tr><th><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label></th><td><input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></td></tr>
+ >>> f = ContactForm()
+ >>> f.as_table()
+ u'<tr><th><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label></th><td><input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></td></tr>\n<tr><th><label for="id_message">Message:</label></th><td><input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></td></tr>\n<tr><th><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label></th><td><input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></td></tr>\n<tr><th><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label></th><td><input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></td></tr>'
+ >>> print(f.as_table())
+ <tr><th><label for="id_subject">Subject:</label></th><td><input id="id_subject" type="text" name="subject" maxlength="100" /></td></tr>
+ <tr><th><label for="id_message">Message:</label></th><td><input type="text" name="message" id="id_message" /></td></tr>
+ <tr><th><label for="id_sender">Sender:</label></th><td><input type="email" name="sender" id="id_sender" /></td></tr>
+ <tr><th><label for="id_cc_myself">Cc myself:</label></th><td><input type="checkbox" name="cc_myself" id="id_cc_myself" /></td></tr>
Styling required or erroneous form rows
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
@@ -391,6 +393,8 @@ attributes to required rows or to rows with errors: simply set the
:attr:`Form.error_css_class` and/or :attr:`Form.required_css_class`
attributes::
+ from django.forms import Form
+
class ContactForm(Form):
error_css_class = 'error'
required_css_class = 'required'
@@ -621,23 +625,23 @@ For a field's list of errors, access the field's ``errors`` attribute.
.. attribute:: BoundField.errors
- A list-like object that is displayed as an HTML ``<ul class="errorlist">``
- when printed::
+A list-like object that is displayed as an HTML ``<ul class="errorlist">``
+when printed::
- >>> data = {'subject': 'hi', 'message': '', 'sender': '', 'cc_myself': ''}
- >>> f = ContactForm(data, auto_id=False)
- >>> print(f['message'])
- <input type="text" name="message" />
- >>> f['message'].errors
- [u'This field is required.']
- >>> print(f['message'].errors)
- <ul class="errorlist"><li>This field is required.</li></ul>
- >>> f['subject'].errors
- []
- >>> print(f['subject'].errors)
+ >>> data = {'subject': 'hi', 'message': '', 'sender': '', 'cc_myself': ''}
+ >>> f = ContactForm(data, auto_id=False)
+ >>> print(f['message'])
+ <input type="text" name="message" />
+ >>> f['message'].errors
+ [u'This field is required.']
+ >>> print(f['message'].errors)
+ <ul class="errorlist"><li>This field is required.</li></ul>
+ >>> f['subject'].errors
+ []
+ >>> print(f['subject'].errors)
- >>> str(f['subject'].errors)
- ''
+ >>> str(f['subject'].errors)
+ ''
.. method:: BoundField.label_tag(contents=None, attrs=None)
@@ -779,6 +783,7 @@ example, ``BeatleForm`` subclasses both ``PersonForm`` and ``InstrumentForm``
(in that order), and its field list includes the fields from the parent
classes::
+ >>> from django.forms import Form
>>> class PersonForm(Form):
... first_name = CharField()
... last_name = CharField()
View
8 docs/ref/forms/fields.txt
@@ -48,6 +48,7 @@ By default, each ``Field`` class assumes the value is required, so if you pass
an empty value -- either ``None`` or the empty string (``""``) -- then
``clean()`` will raise a ``ValidationError`` exception::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> f = forms.CharField()
>>> f.clean('foo')
u'foo'
@@ -107,6 +108,7 @@ behavior doesn't result in an adequate label.
Here's a full example ``Form`` that implements ``label`` for two of its fields.
We've specified ``auto_id=False`` to simplify the output::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> class CommentForm(forms.Form):
... name = forms.CharField(label='Your name')
... url = forms.URLField(label='Your Web site', required=False)
@@ -130,6 +132,7 @@ To specify dynamic initial data, see the :attr:`Form.initial` parameter.
The use-case for this is when you want to display an "empty" form in which a
field is initialized to a particular value. For example::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> class CommentForm(forms.Form):
... name = forms.CharField(initial='Your name')
... url = forms.URLField(initial='http://')
@@ -205,6 +208,7 @@ methods (e.g., ``as_ul()``).
Here's a full example ``Form`` that implements ``help_text`` for two of its
fields. We've specified ``auto_id=False`` to simplify the output::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> class HelpTextContactForm(forms.Form):
... subject = forms.CharField(max_length=100, help_text='100 characters max.')
... message = forms.CharField()
@@ -236,6 +240,7 @@ The ``error_messages`` argument lets you override the default messages that the
field will raise. Pass in a dictionary with keys matching the error messages you
want to override. For example, here is the default error message::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> generic = forms.CharField()
>>> generic.clean('')
Traceback (most recent call last):
@@ -853,6 +858,7 @@ Slightly complex built-in ``Field`` classes
The list of fields that should be used to validate the field's value (in
the order in which they are provided).
+ >>> from django.forms import ComboField
>>> f = ComboField(fields=[CharField(max_length=20), EmailField()])
>>> f.clean('test@example.com')
u'test@example.com'
@@ -1001,6 +1007,8 @@ objects (in the case of ``ModelMultipleChoiceField``) into the
object, and should return a string suitable for representing it. For
example::
+ from django.forms import ModelChoiceField
+
class MyModelChoiceField(ModelChoiceField):
def label_from_instance(self, obj):
return "My Object #%i" % obj.id
View
9 docs/ref/forms/validation.txt
@@ -183,6 +183,9 @@ the ``default_validators`` attribute.
Simple validators can be used to validate values inside the field, let's have
a look at Django's ``SlugField``::
+ from django.forms import CharField
+ from django.core import validators
+
class SlugField(CharField):
default_validators = [validators.validate_slug]
@@ -252,6 +255,8 @@ we want to make sure that the ``recipients`` field always contains the address
don't want to put it into the general ``MultiEmailField`` class. Instead, we
write a cleaning method that operates on the ``recipients`` field, like so::
+ from django import forms
+
class ContactForm(forms.Form):
# Everything as before.
...
@@ -289,6 +294,8 @@ common method is to display the error at the top of the form. To create such
an error, you can raise a ``ValidationError`` from the ``clean()`` method. For
example::
+ from django import forms
+
class ContactForm(forms.Form):
# Everything as before.
...
@@ -321,6 +328,8 @@ here and leaving it up to you and your designers to work out what works
effectively in your particular situation. Our new code (replacing the previous
sample) looks like this::
+ from django import forms
+
class ContactForm(forms.Form):
# Everything as before.
...
View
3  docs/ref/forms/widgets.txt
@@ -201,6 +201,7 @@ foundation for custom widgets.
.. code-block:: python
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> name = forms.TextInput(attrs={'size': 10, 'title': 'Your name',})
>>> name.render('name', 'A name')
u'<input title="Your name" type="text" name="name" value="A name" size="10" />'
@@ -249,6 +250,8 @@ foundation for custom widgets.
:class:`~datetime.datetime` value into a list with date and time split
into two separate values::
+ from django.forms import MultiWidget
+
class SplitDateTimeWidget(MultiWidget):
# ...
View
26 docs/topics/forms/formsets.txt
@@ -56,6 +56,9 @@ telling the formset how many additional forms to show in addition to the
number of forms it generates from the initial data. Lets take a look at an
example::
+ >>> import datetime
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms imporrt ArticleForm
>>> ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm, extra=2)
>>> formset = ArticleFormSet(initial=[
... {'title': u'Django is now open source',
@@ -88,6 +91,8 @@ The ``max_num`` parameter to :func:`~django.forms.formsets.formset_factory`
gives you the ability to limit the maximum number of empty forms the formset
will display::
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms imporrt ArticleForm
>>> ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm, extra=2, max_num=1)
>>> formset = ArticleFormSet()
>>> for form in formset:
@@ -124,6 +129,8 @@ Validation with a formset is almost identical to a regular ``Form``. There is
an ``is_valid`` method on the formset to provide a convenient way to validate
all forms in the formset::
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms imporrt ArticleForm
>>> ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm)
>>> data = {
... 'form-TOTAL_FORMS': u'1',
@@ -230,6 +237,8 @@ A formset has a ``clean`` method similar to the one on a ``Form`` class. This
is where you define your own validation that works at the formset level::
>>> from django.forms.formsets import BaseFormSet
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms import ArticleForm
>>> class BaseArticleFormSet(BaseFormSet):
... def clean(self):
@@ -276,6 +285,8 @@ If ``validate_max=True`` is passed to
:func:`~django.forms.formsets.formset_factory`, validation will also check
that the number of forms in the data set is less than or equal to ``max_num``.
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms import ArticleForm
>>> ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm, max_num=1, validate_max=True)
>>> data = {
... 'form-TOTAL_FORMS': u'2',
@@ -329,6 +340,8 @@ Default: ``False``
Lets you create a formset with the ability to order::
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms import ArticleForm
>>> ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm, can_order=True)
>>> formset = ArticleFormSet(initial=[
... {'title': u'Article #1', 'pub_date': datetime.date(2008, 5, 10)},
@@ -385,6 +398,8 @@ Default: ``False``
Lets you create a formset with the ability to delete::
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms import ArticleForm
>>> ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm, can_delete=True)
>>> formset = ArticleFormSet(initial=[
... {'title': u'Article #1', 'pub_date': datetime.date(2008, 5, 10)},
@@ -437,6 +452,9 @@ accomplished. The formset base class provides an ``add_fields`` method. You
can simply override this method to add your own fields or even redefine the
default fields/attributes of the order and deletion fields::
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import BaseFormSet
+ >>> from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.forms import ArticleForm
>>> class BaseArticleFormSet(BaseFormSet):
... def add_fields(self, form, index):
... super(BaseArticleFormSet, self).add_fields(form, index)
@@ -459,6 +477,10 @@ management form inside the template. Let's look at a sample view:
.. code-block:: python
+ from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
+ from myapp.forms import ArticleForm
+
def manage_articles(request):
ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm)
if request.method == 'POST':
@@ -534,6 +556,10 @@ a look at how this might be accomplished:
.. code-block:: python
+ from django.forms.formsets import formset_factory
+ from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
+ from myapp.forms import ArticleForm, BookForm
+
def manage_articles(request):
ArticleFormSet = formset_factory(ArticleForm)
BookFormSet = formset_factory(BookForm)
View
5 docs/topics/forms/media.txt
@@ -49,6 +49,8 @@ define the media requirements.
Here's a simple example::
+ from django import froms
+
class CalendarWidget(forms.TextInput):
class Media:
css = {
@@ -211,6 +213,7 @@ to using :setting:`MEDIA_URL`. For example, if the :setting:`MEDIA_URL` for
your site was ``'http://uploads.example.com/'`` and :setting:`STATIC_URL`
was ``None``::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> class CalendarWidget(forms.TextInput):
... class Media:
... css = {
@@ -267,6 +270,7 @@ Combining media objects
Media objects can also be added together. When two media objects are added,
the resulting Media object contains the union of the media from both files::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> class CalendarWidget(forms.TextInput):
... class Media:
... css = {
@@ -298,6 +302,7 @@ Regardless of whether you define a media declaration, *all* Form objects
have a media property. The default value for this property is the result
of adding the media definitions for all widgets that are part of the form::
+ >>> from django import forms
>>> class ContactForm(forms.Form):
... date = DateField(widget=CalendarWidget)
... name = CharField(max_length=40, widget=OtherWidget)
View
31 docs/topics/forms/modelforms.txt
@@ -23,6 +23,7 @@ class from a Django model.
For example::
>>> from django.forms import ModelForm
+ >>> from myapp.models import Article
# Create the form class.
>>> class ArticleForm(ModelForm):
@@ -222,6 +223,9 @@ supplied, ``save()`` will update that instance. If it's not supplied,
.. code-block:: python
+ >>> from myapp.models import Article
+ >>> from myapp.forms import ArticleForm
+
# Create a form instance from POST data.
>>> f = ArticleForm(request.POST)
@@ -316,6 +320,8 @@ these security concerns do not apply to you:
1. Set the ``fields`` attribute to the special value ``'__all__'`` to indicate
that all fields in the model should be used. For example::
+ from django.forms import ModelForm
+
class AuthorForm(ModelForm):
class Meta:
model = Author
@@ -401,6 +407,7 @@ of its default ``<input type="text">``, you can override the field's
widget::
from django.forms import ModelForm, Textarea
+ from myapp.models import Author
class AuthorForm(ModelForm):
class Meta:
@@ -421,6 +428,9 @@ you can do this by declaratively specifying fields like you would in a regular
For example, if you wanted to use ``MyDateFormField`` for the ``pub_date``
field, you could do the following::
+ from django.forms import ModelForm
+ from myapp.models import Article
+
class ArticleForm(ModelForm):
pub_date = MyDateFormField()
@@ -432,6 +442,9 @@ field, you could do the following::
If you want to override a field's default label, then specify the ``label``
parameter when declaring the form field::
+ from django.forms import ModelForm, DateField
+ from myapp.models import Article
+
class ArticleForm(ModelForm):
pub_date = DateField(label='Publication date')
@@ -484,6 +497,8 @@ By default, the fields in a ``ModelForm`` will not localize their data. To
enable localization for fields, you can use the ``localized_fields``
attribute on the ``Meta`` class.
+ >>> from django.forms import ModelForm
+ >>> from myapp.models import Author
>>> class AuthorForm(ModelForm):
... class Meta:
... model = Author
@@ -574,6 +589,7 @@ definition. This may be more convenient if you do not have many customizations
to make::
>>> from django.forms.models import modelform_factory
+ >>> from myapp.models import Book
>>> BookForm = modelform_factory(Book, fields=("author", "title"))
This can also be used to make simple modifications to existing forms, for
@@ -604,6 +620,7 @@ of enhanced formset classes that make it easy to work with Django models. Let's
reuse the ``Author`` model from above::
>>> from django.forms.models import modelformset_factory
+ >>> from myapp.models import Author
>>> AuthorFormSet = modelformset_factory(Author)
This will create a formset that is capable of working with the data associated
@@ -642,6 +659,7 @@ Alternatively, you can create a subclass that sets ``self.queryset`` in
``__init__``::
from django.forms.models import BaseModelFormSet
+ from myapp.models import Author
class BaseAuthorFormSet(BaseModelFormSet):
def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
@@ -787,6 +805,10 @@ Using a model formset in a view
Model formsets are very similar to formsets. Let's say we want to present a
formset to edit ``Author`` model instances::
+ from django.forms.models import modelformset_factory
+ from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
+ from myapp.models import Author
+
def manage_authors(request):
AuthorFormSet = modelformset_factory(Author)
if request.method == 'POST':
@@ -815,12 +837,15 @@ the unique constraints on your model (either ``unique``, ``unique_together`` or
on a ``model_formset`` and maintain this validation, you must call the parent
class's ``clean`` method::
+ from django.forms.models import BaseModelFormSet
+
class MyModelFormSet(BaseModelFormSet):
def clean(self):
super(MyModelFormSet, self).clean()
# example custom validation across forms in the formset:
for form in self.forms:
# your custom formset validation
+ pass
Using a custom queryset
-----------------------
@@ -828,6 +853,10 @@ Using a custom queryset
As stated earlier, you can override the default queryset used by the model
formset::
+ from django.forms.models import modelformset_factory
+ from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
+ from myapp.models import Author
+
def manage_authors(request):
AuthorFormSet = modelformset_factory(Author)
if request.method == "POST":
@@ -914,6 +943,8 @@ Inline formsets is a small abstraction layer on top of model formsets. These
simplify the case of working with related objects via a foreign key. Suppose
you have these two models::
+ from django.db import models
+
class Author(models.Model):
name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
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