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[1.5.X] Fixed more broken links. refs #19516

Backport of 9c5a6ad from master
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commit 1c1df12388e394b7f1dc3949d23b99fa80cf6f6a 1 parent 8738da0
Tim Graham authored December 25, 2012
66  docs/ref/contrib/gis/gdal.txt
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ of GDAL is the `OGR`__ Simple Features Library, which specializes
13 13
 in reading and writing vector geographic data in a variety of standard
14 14
 formats.
15 15
 
16  
-GeoDjango provides a high-level Python interface for some of the 
  16
+GeoDjango provides a high-level Python interface for some of the
17 17
 capabilities of OGR, including the reading and coordinate transformation
18 18
 of vector spatial data.
19 19
 
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ of vector spatial data.
22 22
      Although the module is named ``gdal``, GeoDjango only supports
23 23
      some of the capabilities of OGR.  Thus, none of GDAL's features
24 24
      with respect to raster (image) data are supported at this time.
25  
-   
  25
+
26 26
 __ http://www.gdal.org/
27 27
 __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/
28 28
 
@@ -68,13 +68,13 @@ each feature in that layer.
68 68
    also supports a variety of more complex data sources, including
69 69
    databases, that may be accessed by passing a special name string instead
70 70
    of a path.  For more information, see the `OGR Vector Formats`__
71  
-   documentation.  The :attr:`name` property of a ``DataSource`` 
  71
+   documentation.  The :attr:`name` property of a ``DataSource``
72 72
    instance gives the OGR name of the underlying data source that it is
73 73
    using.
74 74
 
75  
-   Once you've created your ``DataSource``, you can find out how many 
76  
-   layers of data it contains by accessing the :attr:`layer_count` property, 
77  
-   or (equivalently) by using the ``len()`` function.  For information on 
  75
+   Once you've created your ``DataSource``, you can find out how many
  76
+   layers of data it contains by accessing the :attr:`layer_count` property,
  77
+   or (equivalently) by using the ``len()`` function.  For information on
78 78
    accessing the layers of data themselves, see the next section::
79 79
 
80 80
        >>> from django.contrib.gis.gdal import DataSource
@@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
105 105
    Python container of ``Layer`` objects.  For example, you can access a
106 106
    specific layer by its index (e.g. ``ds[0]`` to access the first
107 107
    layer), or you can iterate over all the layers in the container in a
108  
-   ``for`` loop.  The ``Layer`` itself acts as a container for geometric 
  108
+   ``for`` loop.  The ``Layer`` itself acts as a container for geometric
109 109
    features.
110 110
 
111 111
    Typically, all the features in a given layer have the same geometry type.
@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
120 120
 
121 121
    The example output is from the cities data source, loaded above, which
122 122
    evidently contains one layer, called ``"cities"``, which contains three
123  
-   point features.  For simplicity, the examples below assume that you've 
  123
+   point features.  For simplicity, the examples below assume that you've
124 124
    stored that layer in the variable ``layer``::
125 125
 
126 126
        >>> layer = ds[0]
@@ -169,7 +169,7 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
169 169
 
170 170
        >>> [ft.__name__ for ft in layer.field_types]
171 171
        ['OFTString', 'OFTReal', 'OFTReal', 'OFTDate']
172  
- 
  172
+
173 173
    .. attribute:: field_widths
174 174
 
175 175
    Returns a list of the maximum field widths for each of the fields in
@@ -181,7 +181,7 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
181 181
    .. attribute:: field_precisions
182 182
 
183 183
    Returns a list of the numeric precisions for each of the fields in
184  
-   this layer.  This is meaningless (and set to zero) for non-numeric 
  184
+   this layer.  This is meaningless (and set to zero) for non-numeric
185 185
    fields::
186 186
 
187 187
        >>> layer.field_precisions
@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
189 189
 
190 190
    .. attribute:: extent
191 191
 
192  
-   Returns the spatial extent of this layer, as an :class:`Envelope` 
  192
+   Returns the spatial extent of this layer, as an :class:`Envelope`
193 193
    object::
194 194
 
195 195
       >>> layer.extent.tuple
@@ -214,7 +214,7 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
214 214
 
215 215
    Property that may be used to retrieve or set a spatial filter for this
216 216
    layer.  A spatial filter can only be set with an :class:`OGRGeometry`
217  
-   instance, a 4-tuple extent, or ``None``.  When set with something 
  217
+   instance, a 4-tuple extent, or ``None``.  When set with something
218 218
    other than ``None``, only features that intersect the filter will be
219 219
    returned when iterating over the layer::
220 220
 
@@ -258,9 +258,9 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
258 258
    given capability (a string).  Examples of valid capability strings
259 259
    include: ``'RandomRead'``, ``'SequentialWrite'``, ``'RandomWrite'``,
260 260
    ``'FastSpatialFilter'``, ``'FastFeatureCount'``, ``'FastGetExtent'``,
261  
-   ``'CreateField'``, ``'Transactions'``, ``'DeleteFeature'``, and 
  261
+   ``'CreateField'``, ``'Transactions'``, ``'DeleteFeature'``, and
262 262
    ``'FastSetNextByIndex'``.
263  
-   
  263
+
264 264
 ``Feature``
265 265
 -----------
266 266
 
@@ -295,14 +295,14 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
295 295
 
296 296
    Returns the type of geometry for this feature, as an :class:`OGRGeomType`
297 297
    object.  This will be the same for all features in a given layer, and
298  
-   is equivalent to the :attr:`Layer.geom_type` property of the 
299  
-   :class:`Layer`` object the feature came from.
  298
+   is equivalent to the :attr:`Layer.geom_type` property of the
  299
+   :class:`Layer` object the feature came from.
300 300
 
301 301
    .. attribute:: num_fields
302 302
 
303 303
    Returns the number of fields of data associated with the feature.
304 304
    This will be the same for all features in a given layer, and is
305  
-   equivalent to the :attr:`Layer.num_fields` property of the 
  305
+   equivalent to the :attr:`Layer.num_fields` property of the
306 306
    :class:`Layer` object the feature came from.
307 307
 
308 308
    .. attribute:: fields
@@ -350,7 +350,7 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
350 350
    .. attribute:: type
351 351
 
352 352
    Returns the OGR type of this field, as an integer.  The
353  
-   ``FIELD_CLASSES`` dictionary maps these values onto 
  353
+   ``FIELD_CLASSES`` dictionary maps these values onto
354 354
    subclasses of ``Field``::
355 355
 
356 356
        >>> city['Density'].type
@@ -365,8 +365,8 @@ __ http://www.gdal.org/ogr/ogr_formats.html
365 365
 
366 366
    .. attribute:: value
367 367
 
368  
-   Returns the value of this field.  The ``Field`` class itself 
369  
-   returns the value as a string, but each subclass returns the 
  368
+   Returns the value of this field.  The ``Field`` class itself
  369
+   returns the value as a string, but each subclass returns the
370 370
    value in the most appropriate form::
371 371
 
372 372
        >>> city['Population'].value
@@ -433,10 +433,10 @@ OGR Geometries
433 433
 ``OGRGeometry``
434 434
 ---------------
435 435
 
436  
-:class:`OGRGeometry` objects share similar functionality with 
  436
+:class:`OGRGeometry` objects share similar functionality with
437 437
 :class:`~django.contrib.gis.geos.GEOSGeometry` objects, and are thin
438  
-wrappers around OGR's internal geometry representation.  Thus, 
439  
-they allow for more efficient access to data when using :class:`DataSource`. 
  438
+wrappers around OGR's internal geometry representation.  Thus,
  439
+they allow for more efficient access to data when using :class:`DataSource`.
440 440
 Unlike its GEOS counterpart, :class:`OGRGeometry` supports spatial reference
441 441
 systems and coordinate transformation::
442 442
 
@@ -446,10 +446,10 @@ systems and coordinate transformation::
446 446
 .. class:: OGRGeometry(geom_input[, srs=None])
447 447
 
448 448
    This object is a wrapper for the `OGR Geometry`__ class.
449  
-   These objects are instantiated directly from the given ``geom_input`` 
  449
+   These objects are instantiated directly from the given ``geom_input``
450 450
    parameter, which may be a string containing WKT, HEX, GeoJSON, a ``buffer``
451 451
    containing WKB data, or an :class:`OGRGeomType` object. These objects
452  
-   are also returned from the :class:`Feature.geom` attribute, when 
  452
+   are also returned from the :class:`Feature.geom` attribute, when
453 453
    reading vector data from :class:`Layer` (which is in turn a part of
454 454
    a :class:`DataSource`).
455 455
 
@@ -557,14 +557,14 @@ systems and coordinate transformation::
557 557
 
558 558
    .. attribute:: srid
559 559
 
560  
-   Returns or sets the spatial reference identifier corresponding to 
  560
+   Returns or sets the spatial reference identifier corresponding to
561 561
    :class:`SpatialReference` of this geometry.  Returns ``None`` if
562 562
    there is no spatial reference information associated with this
563 563
    geometry, or if an SRID cannot be determined.
564 564
 
565 565
    .. attribute:: geos
566 566
 
567  
-   Returns a :class:`~django.contrib.gis.geos.GEOSGeometry` object 
  567
+   Returns a :class:`~django.contrib.gis.geos.GEOSGeometry` object
568 568
    corresponding to this geometry.
569 569
 
570 570
    .. attribute:: gml
@@ -762,9 +762,9 @@ systems and coordinate transformation::
762 762
 
763 763
    .. attribute:: z
764 764
 
765  
-   Returns a list of Z coordinates in this line, or ``None`` if the 
  765
+   Returns a list of Z coordinates in this line, or ``None`` if the
766 766
    line does not have Z coordinates::
767  
- 
  767
+
768 768
        >>> OGRGeometry('LINESTRING (1 2 3,4 5 6)').z
769 769
        [3.0, 6.0]
770 770
 
@@ -885,7 +885,7 @@ Coordinate System Objects
885 885
 
886 886
    Spatial reference objects are initialized on the given ``srs_input``,
887 887
    which may be one of the following:
888  
- 
  888
+
889 889
    * OGC Well Known Text (WKT) (a string)
890 890
    * EPSG code (integer or string)
891 891
    * PROJ.4 string
@@ -912,7 +912,7 @@ Coordinate System Objects
912 912
    .. method:: __getitem__(target)
913 913
 
914 914
    Returns the value of the given string attribute node, ``None`` if the node
915  
-   doesn't exist.  Can also take a tuple as a parameter, (target, child), 
  915
+   doesn't exist.  Can also take a tuple as a parameter, (target, child),
916 916
    where child is the index of the attribute in the WKT.  For example::
917 917
 
918 918
        >>> wkt = 'GEOGCS["WGS 84", DATUM["WGS_1984, ... AUTHORITY["EPSG","4326"]]')
@@ -1011,7 +1011,7 @@ Coordinate System Objects
1011 1011
 
1012 1012
    .. attribute:: units
1013 1013
 
1014  
-   Returns a 2-tuple of the units value and the units name, 
  1014
+   Returns a 2-tuple of the units value and the units name,
1015 1015
    and will automatically determines whether to return the linear
1016 1016
    or angular units.
1017 1017
 
@@ -1073,7 +1073,7 @@ Coordinate System Objects
1073 1073
 
1074 1074
 .. class:: CoordTransform(source, target)
1075 1075
 
1076  
-Represents a coordinate system transform.  It is initialized with two 
  1076
+Represents a coordinate system transform.  It is initialized with two
1077 1077
 :class:`SpatialReference`, representing the source and target coordinate
1078 1078
 systems, respectively.  These objects should be used when performing
1079 1079
 the same coordinate transformation repeatedly on different geometries::
2  docs/ref/models/fields.txt
@@ -919,7 +919,7 @@ A :class:`CharField` for a URL.
919 919
 The default form widget for this field is a :class:`~django.forms.TextInput`.
920 920
 
921 921
 Like all :class:`CharField` subclasses, :class:`URLField` takes the optional
922  
-:attr:`~CharField.max_length`argument. If you don't specify
  922
+:attr:`~CharField.max_length` argument. If you don't specify
923 923
 :attr:`~CharField.max_length`, a default of 200 is used.
924 924
 
925 925
 .. versionadded:: 1.5
6  docs/ref/models/options.txt
@@ -85,14 +85,14 @@ Django quotes column and table names behind the scenes.
85 85
 
86 86
     The name of an orderable field in the model, typically a :class:`DateField`,
87 87
     :class:`DateTimeField`, or :class:`IntegerField`. This specifies the default
88  
-    field to use in your model :class:`Manager`'s :class:`~QuerySet.latest`
89  
-    method.
  88
+    field to use in your model :class:`Manager`'s
  89
+    :meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.latest` method.
90 90
 
91 91
     Example::
92 92
 
93 93
         get_latest_by = "order_date"
94 94
 
95  
-    See the docs for :meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.latest` for more.
  95
+    See the :meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.latest` docs for more.
96 96
 
97 97
 ``managed``
98 98
 -----------
2  docs/ref/models/querysets.txt
@@ -1637,7 +1637,7 @@ Finally, realize that ``update()`` does an update at the SQL level and, thus,
1637 1637
 does not call any ``save()`` methods on your models, nor does it emit the
1638 1638
 :attr:`~django.db.models.signals.pre_save` or
1639 1639
 :attr:`~django.db.models.signals.post_save` signals (which are a consequence of
1640  
-calling :meth:`Model.save() <~django.db.models.Model.save()>`). If you want to
  1640
+calling :meth:`Model.save() <django.db.models.Model.save>`). If you want to
1641 1641
 update a bunch of records for a model that has a custom
1642 1642
 :meth:`~django.db.models.Model.save()` method, loop over them and call
1643 1643
 :meth:`~django.db.models.Model.save()`, like this::
8  docs/ref/settings.txt
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ The cache backend to use. The built-in cache backends are:
159 159
 * ``'django.core.cache.backends.memcached.PyLibMCCache'``
160 160
 
161 161
 You can use a cache backend that doesn't ship with Django by setting
162  
-:setting:`BACKEND <CACHE-BACKEND>` to a fully-qualified path of a cache
  162
+:setting:`BACKEND <CACHES-BACKEND>` to a fully-qualified path of a cache
163 163
 backend class (i.e. ``mypackage.backends.whatever.WhateverCache``).
164 164
 Writing a whole new cache backend from scratch is left as an exercise
165 165
 to the reader; see the other backends for examples.
@@ -830,7 +830,7 @@ DEFAULT_EXCEPTION_REPORTER_FILTER
830 830
 Default: :class:`django.views.debug.SafeExceptionReporterFilter`
831 831
 
832 832
 Default exception reporter filter class to be used if none has been assigned to
833  
-the :class:`HttpRequest` instance yet.
  833
+the :class:`~django.http.HttpRequest` instance yet.
834 834
 See :ref:`Filtering error reports<filtering-error-reports>`.
835 835
 
836 836
 .. setting:: DEFAULT_FILE_STORAGE
@@ -1070,6 +1070,8 @@ Note that these paths should use Unix-style forward slashes, even on Windows.
1070 1070
 
1071 1071
 See :ref:`initial-data-via-fixtures` and :ref:`topics-testing-fixtures`.
1072 1072
 
  1073
+.. setting:: FORCE_SCRIPT_NAME
  1074
+
1073 1075
 FORCE_SCRIPT_NAME
1074 1076
 ------------------
1075 1077
 
@@ -1498,7 +1500,7 @@ PROFANITIES_LIST
1498 1500
 Default: ``()`` (Empty tuple)
1499 1501
 
1500 1502
 A tuple of profanities, as strings, that will be forbidden in comments when
1501  
-:setting:`COMMENTS_ALLOW_PROFANITIES` is ``False``.
  1503
+``COMMENTS_ALLOW_PROFANITIES`` is ``False``.
1502 1504
 
1503 1505
 .. setting:: RESTRUCTUREDTEXT_FILTER_SETTINGS
1504 1506
 
10  docs/releases/1.1-alpha-1.txt
@@ -32,11 +32,13 @@ Aggregate support
32 32
 It's now possible to run SQL aggregate queries (i.e. ``COUNT()``, ``MAX()``,
33 33
 ``MIN()``, etc.) from within Django's ORM. You can choose to either return the
34 34
 results of the aggregate directly, or else annotate the objects in a
35  
-:class:`QuerySet` with the results of the aggregate query.
  35
+:class:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet` with the results of the aggregate
  36
+query.
36 37
 
37  
-This feature is available as new :meth:`QuerySet.aggregate()`` and
38  
-:meth:`QuerySet.annotate()`` methods, and is covered in detail in :doc:`the ORM
39  
-aggregation documentation </topics/db/aggregation>`
  38
+This feature is available as new
  39
+:meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.aggregate` and
  40
+:meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.annotate` methods, and is covered in
  41
+detail in :doc:`the ORM aggregation documentation </topics/db/aggregation>`.
40 42
 
41 43
 Query expressions
42 44
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
10  docs/releases/1.1.txt
@@ -198,11 +198,13 @@ Aggregate support
198 198
 It's now possible to run SQL aggregate queries (i.e. ``COUNT()``, ``MAX()``,
199 199
 ``MIN()``, etc.) from within Django's ORM. You can choose to either return the
200 200
 results of the aggregate directly, or else annotate the objects in a
201  
-:class:`QuerySet` with the results of the aggregate query.
  201
+:class:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet` with the results of the aggregate
  202
+query.
202 203
 
203  
-This feature is available as new :meth:`QuerySet.aggregate()`` and
204  
-:meth:`QuerySet.annotate()`` methods, and is covered in detail in :doc:`the ORM
205  
-aggregation documentation </topics/db/aggregation>`.
  204
+This feature is available as new
  205
+:meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.aggregate` and
  206
+:meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.annotate` methods, and is covered in
  207
+detail in :doc:`the ORM aggregation documentation </topics/db/aggregation>`.
206 208
 
207 209
 Query expressions
208 210
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
17  docs/releases/1.3-alpha-1.txt
@@ -61,15 +61,14 @@ Django 1.3 ships with a new contrib app ``'django.contrib.staticfiles'``
61 61
 to help developers handle the static media files (images, CSS, Javascript,
62 62
 etc.) that are needed to render a complete web page.
63 63
 
64  
-In previous versions of Django, it was common to place static assets in
65  
-:setting:`MEDIA_ROOT` along with user-uploaded files, and serve them both at
66  
-:setting:`MEDIA_URL`. Part of the purpose of introducing the ``staticfiles``
67  
-app is to make it easier to keep static files separate from user-uploaded
68  
-files. For this reason, you will probably want to make your
69  
-:setting:`MEDIA_ROOT` and :setting:`MEDIA_URL` different from your
70  
-:setting:`STATICFILES_ROOT` and :setting:`STATICFILES_URL`. You will need to
71  
-arrange for serving of files in :setting:`MEDIA_ROOT` yourself;
72  
-``staticfiles`` does not deal with user-uploaded media at all.
  64
+In previous versions of Django, it was common to place static assets
  65
+in :setting:`MEDIA_ROOT` along with user-uploaded files, and serve
  66
+them both at :setting:`MEDIA_URL`. Part of the purpose of introducing
  67
+the ``staticfiles`` app is to make it easier to keep static files
  68
+separate from user-uploaded files. Static assets should now go in
  69
+``static/`` subdirectories of your apps or in other static assets
  70
+directories listed in :setting:`STATICFILES_DIRS`, and will be served
  71
+at :setting:`STATIC_URL`.
73 72
 
74 73
 See the :doc:`reference documentation of the app </ref/contrib/staticfiles>`
75 74
 for more details or learn how to :doc:`manage static files
4  docs/releases/1.4.txt
@@ -37,8 +37,8 @@ Other notable new features in Django 1.4 include:
37 37
   the ability to `bulk insert <#model-objects-bulk-create-in-the-orm>`_
38 38
   large datasets for improved performance, and
39 39
   `QuerySet.prefetch_related`_, a method to batch-load related objects
40  
-  in areas where :meth:`~django.db.models.QuerySet.select_related` doesn't
41  
-  work.
  40
+  in areas where :meth:`~django.db.models.query.QuerySet.select_related`
  41
+  doesn't work.
42 42
 
43 43
 * Some nice security additions, including `improved password hashing`_
44 44
   (featuring PBKDF2_ and bcrypt_ support), new `tools for cryptographic

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