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Fixed #15796 -- Restructured the contributing documentation and added…

… note about newly added Trac abilities. Many thanks to Julien Phalip.

git-svn-id: http://code.djangoproject.com/svn/django/trunk@16284 bcc190cf-cafb-0310-a4f2-bffc1f526a37
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321 docs/howto/contribute.txt
@@ -1,321 +0,0 @@
-===========================
-How to contribute to Django
-===========================
-
-Django is developed 100% by the community, and the more people that are actively
-involved in the code the better Django will be. We recognize that contributing
-to Django can be daunting at first and sometimes confusing even to
-veterans. While we have our official "Contributing to Django" documentation
-which spells out the technical details of triaging tickets and submitting
-patches, it leaves a lot of room for interpretation. This guide aims to offer
-more general advice on issues such as how to interpret the various stages and
-flags in Trac, and how new contributors can get started.
-
-.. seealso::
-
- This guide is meant to answer the most common questions about
- contributing to Django, however it is no substitute for the
- :doc:`/internals/contributing` reference. Please make sure to
- read that document to understand the specific details
- involved in reporting issues and submitting patches.
-
-.. _the-spirit-of-contributing:
-
-"The Spirit of Contributing"
-============================
-
-Django uses Trac_ for managing our progress, and Trac is a community-tended
-garden of the bugs people have found and the features people would like to see
-added. As in any garden, sometimes there are weeds to be pulled and sometimes
-there are flowers and vegetables that need picking. We need your help to sort
-out one from the other, and in the end we all benefit together.
-
-Like all gardens, we can aspire to perfection but in reality there's no such
-thing. Even in the most pristine garden there are still snails and insects. In a
-community garden there are also helpful people who--with the best of
-intentions--fertilize the weeds and poison the roses. It's the job of the
-community as a whole to self-manage, keep the problems to a minimum, and educate
-those coming into the community so that they can become valuable contributing
-members.
-
-Similarly, while we aim for Trac to be a perfect representation of the state of
-Django's progress, we acknowledge that this simply will not happen. By
-distributing the load of Trac maintenance to the community, we accept that there
-will be mistakes. Trac is "mostly accurate", and we give allowances for the fact
-that sometimes it will be wrong. That's okay. We're perfectionists with
-deadlines.
-
-We rely on the community to keep participating, keep tickets as accurate as
-possible, and raise issues for discussion on our mailing lists when there is
-confusion or disagreement.
-
-Django is a community project, and every contribution helps. We can't do this
-without YOU!
-
-.. _Trac: http://code.djangoproject.com/
-
-Understanding Trac
-==================
-
-Trac is Django's sole official issue tracker. All known bugs, desired features
-and ideas for changes are logged there.
-
-However, Trac can be quite confusing even to veteran contributors. Having to
-look at both flags and triage stages isn't immediately obvious, and the stages
-themselves can be misinterpreted.
-
-.. _triage-stages-explained:
-
-What Django's triage stages "really mean"
------------------------------------------
-
-Unreviewed
-~~~~~~~~~~
-
-The ticket has not been reviewed by anyone who felt qualified to make a judgment
-about whether the ticket contained a valid issue, a viable feature, or ought to
-be closed for any of the various reasons.
-
-Accepted
-~~~~~~~~
-
-The big grey area! The absolute meaning of "accepted" is that the issue
-described in the ticket is valid and is in some stage of being worked on. Beyond
-that there are several considerations
-
-
-* **Accepted + No Flags**
-
- The ticket is valid, but no one has submitted a patch for it yet. Often this
- means you could safely start writing a patch for it.
-
-* **Accepted + Has Patch**
-
- The ticket is waiting for people to review the supplied patch. This means
- downloading the patch and trying it out, verifying that it contains tests and
- docs, running the test suite with the included patch, and leaving feedback on
- the ticket.
-
-
-* **Accepted + Has Patch + (any other flag)**
-
- This means the ticket has been reviewed, and has been found to need further
- work. "Needs tests" and "Needs documentation" are self-explanatory. "Patch
- needs improvement" will generally be accompanied by a comment on the ticket
- explaining what is needed to improve the code.
-
-Design Decision Needed
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-This stage is for issues which may be contentious, may be backwards
-incompatible, or otherwise involve high-level design decisions. These decisions
-are generally made by the core committers, however that is not a
-requirement. See the FAQ below for "My ticket has been in DDN forever! What
-should I do?"
-
-Ready For Checkin
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-The ticket was reviewed by any member of the community other than the person who
-supplied the patch and found to meet all the requirements for a commit-ready
-patch. A core committer now needs to give the patch a final review prior to
-being committed. See the FAQ below for "My ticket has been in RFC forever! What
-should I do?"
-
-Someday/Maybe?
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Generally only used for vague/high-level features or design ideas. These tickets
-are uncommon and overall less useful since they don't describe concrete
-actionable issues.
-
-Fixed on a branch
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Used to indicate that a ticket is resolved as part of a major body of work that
-will eventually be merged to trunk. Tickets in this stage generally don't need
-further work. This may happen in the case of major features/refactors in each
-release cycle, or as part of the annual Google Summer of Code efforts.
-
-.. _closing-tickets:
-
-Closing Tickets
----------------
-
-When a ticket has completed its useful lifecycle, it's time for it to be closed.
-Closing a ticket is a big responsibility, though. You have to be sure that
-the issue is really resolved, and you need to keep in mind that the reporter
-of the ticket may not be happy to have their ticket closed (unless it's fixed,
-of course). If you're not certain about closing a ticket, just leave a comment
-with your thoughts instead.
-
-If you do close a ticket, you should always make sure of the following:
-
- * Be certain that the issue is resolved.
-
- * Leave a comment explaining the decision to close the ticket.
-
- * If there is a way they can improve the ticket to reopen it, let them know.
-
- * If the ticket is a duplicate, reference the original ticket.
-
- * **Be polite.** No one likes having their ticket closed. It can be
- frustrating or even discouraging. The best way to avoid turning people
- off from contributing to Django is to be polite and friendly and to offer
- suggestions for how they could improve this ticket and other tickets in the
- future.
-
-.. seealso::
-
- The :ref:`contributing reference <ticket-resolutions>` contains a
- description of each of the available resolutions in Trac.
-
-Example Trac workflow
----------------------
-
-Here we see the life-cycle of an average ticket:
-
-* Alice creates a ticket, and uploads an incomplete patch (no tests, incorrect
- implementation).
-
-* Bob reviews the patch, marks it "Accepted", "needs tests", and "patch needs
- improvement", and leaves a comment telling Alice how the patch could be
- improved.
-
-* Alice updates the patch, adding tests (but not changing the
- implementation). She removes the two flags.
-
-* Charlie reviews the patch and resets the "patch needs improvement" flag with
- another comment about improving the implementation.
-
-* Alice updates the patch, fixing the implementation. She removes the "patch
- needs improvement" flag.
-
-* Daisy reviews the patch, and marks it RFC.
-
-* Jacob reviews the RFC patch, applies it to his checkout, and commits it.
-
-Some tickets require much less feedback than this, but then again some tickets
-require much much more.
-
-Advice for new contributors
-===========================
-
-New contributor and not sure what to do? Want to help but just don't know how to
-get started? This is the section for you.
-
-* **Pick a subject area that you care about, that you are familiar with, or that
- you want to learn about.**
-
- You don't already have to be an expert on the area you want to work on; you
- become an expert through your ongoing contributions to the code.
-
-* **Triage tickets.**
-
- If a ticket is unreviewed and reports a bug, try and duplicate it. If you can
- duplicate it and it seems valid, make a note that you confirmed the bug and
- accept the ticket. Make sure the ticket is filed under the correct component
- area. Consider writing a patch that adds a test for the bug's behavior, even
- if you don't fix the bug itself.
-
-* **Look for tickets that are accepted and review patches to build familiarity
- with the codebase and the process.**
-
- Mark the appropriate flags if a patch needs docs or tests. Look through the
- changes a patch makes, and keep an eye out for syntax that is incompatible
- with older but still supported versions of Python. Run the tests and make sure
- they pass on your system. Where possible and relevant, try them out on a
- database other than SQLite. Leave comments and feedback!
-
-* **Keep old patches up to date.**
-
- Oftentimes the codebase will change between a patch being submitted and the
- time it gets reviewed. Make sure it still applies cleanly and functions as
- expected. Simply updating a patch is both useful and important!
-
-* **Trac isn't an absolute; the context is just as important as the words.**
-
- When reading Trac, you need to take into account who says things, and when
- they were said. Support for an idea two years ago doesn't necessarily mean
- that the idea will still have support. You also need to pay attention to who
- *hasn't* spoken -- for example, if a core team member hasn't been recently
- involved in a discussion, then a ticket may not have the support required to
- get into trunk.
-
-* **Start small.**
-
- It's easier to get feedback on a little issue than on a big one.
-
-* **If you're going to engage in a big task, make sure that your idea has
- support first.**
-
- This means getting someone else to confirm that a bug is real before you fix
- the issue, and ensuring that the core team supports a proposed feature before
- you go implementing it.
-
-* **Be bold! Leave feedback!**
-
- Sometimes it can be scary to put your opinion out to the world and say "this
- ticket is correct" or "this patch needs work", but it's the only way the
- project moves forward. The contributions of the broad Django community
- ultimately have a much greater impact than that of the core developers. We
- can't do it without YOU!
-
-* **Err on the side of caution when marking things Ready For Check-in.**
-
- If you're really not certain if a ticket is ready, don't mark it as
- such. Leave a comment instead, letting others know your thoughts. If you're
- mostly certain, but not completely certain, you might also try asking on IRC
- to see if someone else can confirm your suspicions.
-
-* **Wait for feedback, and respond to feedback that you receive.**
-
- Focus on one or two tickets, see them through from start to finish, and
- repeat. The shotgun approach of taking on lots of tickets and letting some
- fall by the wayside ends up doing more harm than good.
-
-* **Be rigorous.**
-
- When we say ":pep:`8`, and must have docs and tests", we mean it. If a patch
- doesn't have docs and tests, there had better be a good reason. Arguments like
- "I couldn't find any existing tests of this feature" don't carry much
- weight--while it may be true, that means you have the extra-important job of
- writing the very first tests for that feature, not that you get a pass from
- writing tests altogether.
-
-.. note::
-
- The `Reports page`_ contains links to many useful Trac queries, including
- several that are useful for triaging tickets and reviewing patches as
- suggested above.
-
- .. _Reports page: http://code.djangoproject.com/wiki/Reports
-
-
-FAQs
-====
-
-**This ticket I care about has been ignored for days/weeks/months! What can I do
-to get it committed?**
-
-* First off, it's not personal. Django is entirely developed by volunteers (even
- the core devs), and sometimes folks just don't have time. The best thing to do
- is to send a gentle reminder to the Django Developers mailing list asking for
- review on the ticket, or to bring it up in the #django-dev IRC channel.
-
-
-**I'm sure my ticket is absolutely 100% perfect, can I mark it as RFC myself?**
-
-* Short answer: No. It's always better to get another set of eyes on a
- ticket. If you're having trouble getting that second set of eyes, see question
- 1, above.
-
-
-**My ticket has been in DDN forever! What should I do?**
-
-* Design Decision Needed requires consensus about the right solution. At the
- very least it needs consensus among the core developers, and ideally it has
- consensus from the community as well. The best way to accomplish this is to
- start a thread on the Django Developers mailing list, and for very complex
- issues to start a wiki page summarizing the problem and the possible
- solutions.
View
1  docs/howto/index.txt
@@ -11,7 +11,6 @@ you quickly accomplish common tasks.
apache-auth
auth-remote-user
- contribute
custom-management-commands
custom-model-fields
custom-template-tags
View
4 docs/index.txt
@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ The Django open-source project
==============================
* **Community:**
- :doc:`How to get involved <internals/contributing>` |
+ :doc:`How to get involved <internals/contributing/index>` |
:doc:`The release process <internals/release-process>` |
:doc:`Team of committers <internals/committers>` |
:doc:`The Django source code repository <internals/svn>`
@@ -209,7 +209,7 @@ The Django open-source project
:doc:`Overview <misc/design-philosophies>`
* **Documentation:**
- :doc:`About this documentation <internals/documentation>`
+ :doc:`About this documentation <internals/contributing/writing-documentation>`
* **Third-party distributions:**
:doc:`Overview <misc/distributions>`
View
2  docs/internals/committers.txt
@@ -58,6 +58,8 @@ Current developers
Currently, Django is led by a team of volunteers from around the globe.
+.. _django-bdfls:
+
BDFLs
-----
View
1,377 docs/internals/contributing.txt
@@ -1,1377 +0,0 @@
-======================
-Contributing to Django
-======================
-
-If you think working *with* Django is fun, wait until you start working *on*
-it. We're passionate about helping Django users make the jump to contributing
-members of the community, so there are many ways you can help Django's
-development:
-
- * Blog about Django. We syndicate all the Django blogs we know about on
- the `community page`_; contact jacob@jacobian.org if you've got a blog
- you'd like to see on that page.
-
- * Report bugs and request features in our `ticket tracker`_. Please read
- `Reporting bugs`_, below, for the details on how we like our bug reports
- served up.
-
- * Submit patches for new and/or fixed behavior. Please read `Submitting
- patches`_, below, for details on how to submit a patch. If you're looking
- for an easy way to start contributing to Django have a look at the
- `easy-pickings`_ tickets.
-
- * Join the `django-developers`_ mailing list and share your ideas for how
- to improve Django. We're always open to suggestions, although we're
- likely to be skeptical of large-scale suggestions without some code to
- back it up.
-
- * Triage patches that have been submitted by other users. Please read
- `Ticket triage`_ below, for details on the triage process.
-
-That's all you need to know if you'd like to join the Django development
-community. The rest of this document describes the details of how our community
-works and how it handles bugs, mailing lists, and all the other minutiae of
-Django development.
-
-.. seealso::
-
- This document contains specific details for contributing to
- Django. However, many new contributors find this guide confusing
- or intimidating at first. For a simpler introduction
- to becoming a contributor please see the :doc:`/howto/contribute` guide.
-
-.. _reporting-bugs:
-
-Reporting bugs
-==============
-
-Well-written bug reports are *incredibly* helpful. However, there's a certain
-amount of overhead involved in working with any bug tracking system so your
-help in keeping our ticket tracker as useful as possible is appreciated. In
-particular:
-
- * **Do** read the :doc:`FAQ </faq/index>` to see if your issue might
- be a well-known question.
-
- * **Do** `search the tracker`_ to see if your issue has already been filed.
-
- * **Do** ask on `django-users`_ *first* if you're not sure if what you're
- seeing is a bug.
-
- * **Do** write complete, reproducible, specific bug reports. Include as
- much information as you possibly can, complete with code snippets, test
- cases, etc. This means including a clear, concise description of the
- problem, and a clear set of instructions for replicating the problem.
- A minimal example that illustrates the bug in a nice small test case
- is the best possible bug report.
-
- * **Don't** use the ticket system to ask support questions. Use the
- `django-users`_ list, or the `#django`_ IRC channel for that.
-
- * **Don't** use the ticket system to make large-scale feature requests.
- We like to discuss any big changes to Django's core on the
- `django-developers`_ list before actually working on them.
-
- * **Don't** reopen issues that have been marked "wontfix". This mark
- means that the decision has been made that we can't or won't fix
- this particular issue. If you're not sure why, please ask
- on `django-developers`_.
-
- * **Don't** use the ticket tracker for lengthy discussions, because they're
- likely to get lost. If a particular ticket is controversial, please move
- discussion to `django-developers`_.
-
- * **Don't** post to django-developers just to announce that you have filed
- a bug report. All the tickets are mailed to another list
- (`django-updates`_), which is tracked by developers and interested
- community members; we see them as they are filed.
-
-.. _django-updates: http://groups.google.com/group/django-updates
-
-.. _reporting-security-issues:
-
-Reporting security issues
-=========================
-
-Report security issues to security@djangoproject.com. This is a private list
-only open to long-time, highly trusted Django developers, and its archives are
-not publicly readable.
-
-In the event of a confirmed vulnerability in Django itself, we will take the
-following actions:
-
- * Acknowledge to the reporter that we've received the report and that a
- fix is forthcoming. We'll give a rough timeline and ask the reporter
- to keep the issue confidential until we announce it.
-
- * Focus on developing a fix as quickly as possible and produce patches
- against the current and two previous releases.
-
- * Determine a go-public date for announcing the vulnerability and the fix.
- To try to mitigate a possible "arms race" between those applying the
- patch and those trying to exploit the hole, we will not announce
- security problems immediately.
-
- * Pre-notify third-party distributors of Django ("vendors"). We will send
- these vendor notifications through private email which will include
- documentation of the vulnerability, links to the relevant patch(es), and a
- request to keep the vulnerability confidential until the official
- go-public date.
-
- * Publicly announce the vulnerability and the fix on the pre-determined
- go-public date. This will probably mean a new release of Django, but
- in some cases it may simply be patches against current releases.
-
-Submitting patches
-==================
-
-We're always grateful for patches to Django's code. Indeed, bug reports
-with associated patches will get fixed *far* more quickly than those
-without patches.
-
-"Claiming" tickets
-------------------
-
-In an open-source project with hundreds of contributors around the world, it's
-important to manage communication efficiently so that work doesn't get
-duplicated and contributors can be as effective as possible. Hence, our policy
-is for contributors to "claim" tickets in order to let other developers know
-that a particular bug or feature is being worked on.
-
-If you have identified a contribution you want to make and you're capable of
-fixing it (as measured by your coding ability, knowledge of Django internals
-and time availability), claim it by following these steps:
-
- * `Create an account`_ to use in our ticket system.
-
- * If a ticket for this issue doesn't exist yet, create one in our
- `ticket tracker`_.
-
- * If a ticket for this issue already exists, make sure nobody else has
- claimed it. To do this, look at the "Assigned to" section of the ticket.
- If it's assigned to "nobody," then it's available to be claimed.
- Otherwise, somebody else is working on this ticket, and you either find
- another bug/feature to work on, or contact the developer working on the
- ticket to offer your help.
-
- * Log into your account, if you haven't already, by clicking "Login" in the
- upper right of the ticket page.
-
- * Claim the ticket by clicking the radio button next to "Accept ticket"
- near the bottom of the page, then clicking "Submit changes."
-
-If you have an account but have forgotten your password, you can reset it
-using the `password reset page`_.
-
-.. _Create an account: http://www.djangoproject.com/accounts/register/
-.. _password reset page: http://www.djangoproject.com/accounts/password/reset/
-
-Ticket claimers' responsibility
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Once you've claimed a ticket, you have a responsibility to work on that ticket
-in a reasonably timely fashion. If you don't have time to work on it, either
-unclaim it or don't claim it in the first place!
-
-If there's no sign of progress on a particular claimed ticket for a week or
-two, another developer may ask you to relinquish the ticket claim so that it's
-no longer monopolized and somebody else can claim it.
-
-If you've claimed a ticket and it's taking a long time (days or weeks) to code,
-keep everybody updated by posting comments on the ticket. If you don't provide
-regular updates, and you don't respond to a request for a progress report,
-your claim on the ticket may be revoked. As always, more communication is
-better than less communication!
-
-Which tickets should be claimed?
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Of course, going through the steps of claiming tickets is overkill in some
-cases. In the case of small changes, such as typos in the documentation or
-small bugs that will only take a few minutes to fix, you don't need to jump
-through the hoops of claiming tickets. Just submit your patch and be done with
-it.
-
-Patch style
------------
-
- * Make sure your code matches our `coding style`_.
-
- * Submit patches in the format returned by the ``svn diff`` command.
- An exception is for code changes that are described more clearly in
- plain English than in code. Indentation is the most common example; it's
- hard to read patches when the only difference in code is that it's
- indented.
-
- Patches in ``git diff`` format are also acceptable.
-
- * When creating patches, always run ``svn diff`` from the top-level
- ``trunk`` directory -- i.e., the one that contains ``django``, ``docs``,
- ``tests``, ``AUTHORS``, etc. This makes it easy for other people to
- apply your patches.
-
- * Attach patches to a ticket in the `ticket tracker`_, using the "attach
- file" button. Please *don't* put the patch in the ticket description
- or comment unless it's a single line patch.
-
- * Name the patch file with a ``.diff`` extension; this will let the ticket
- tracker apply correct syntax highlighting, which is quite helpful.
-
- * Check the "Has patch" box on the ticket details. This will make it
- obvious that the ticket includes a patch, and it will add the ticket to
- the `list of tickets with patches`_.
-
- * The code required to fix a problem or add a feature is an essential part
- of a patch, but it is not the only part. A good patch should also include
- a regression test to validate the behavior that has been fixed
- (and prevent the problem from arising again).
-
- * If the code associated with a patch adds a new feature, or modifies
- behavior of an existing feature, the patch should also contain
- documentation.
-
-Non-trivial patches
--------------------
-
-A "non-trivial" patch is one that is more than a simple bug fix. It's a patch
-that introduces Django functionality and makes some sort of design decision.
-
-If you provide a non-trivial patch, include evidence that alternatives have
-been discussed on `django-developers`_. If you're not sure whether your patch
-should be considered non-trivial, just ask.
-
-Ticket triage
-=============
-
-Unfortunately, not all bug reports in the `ticket tracker`_ provide all
-the `required details`_. A number of tickets have patches, but those patches
-don't meet all the requirements of a `good patch`_.
-
-One way to help out is to *triage* bugs that have been reported by other
-users. The core team--as well as many community members--work on this
-regularly, but more help is always appreciated.
-
-Most of the workflow is based around the concept of a ticket's "triage stage".
-This stage describes where in its lifetime a given ticket is at any time.
-Along with a handful of flags, this field easily tells us what and who each
-ticket is waiting on.
-
-Since a picture is worth a thousand words, let's start there:
-
-.. image:: _images/djangotickets.png
- :height: 451
- :width: 590
- :alt: Django's ticket workflow
-
-We've got two roles in this diagram:
-
- * Core developers: people with commit access who are responsible for
- making the big decisions, writing large portions of the code and
- integrating the contributions of the community.
-
- * Ticket triagers: anyone in the Django community who chooses to
- become involved in Django's development process. Our Trac installation
- is :ref:`intentionally left open to the public
- <the-spirit-of-contributing>`, and anyone can triage tickets.
- Django is a community project, and we encourage `triage by the
- community`_.
-
-Triage stages
--------------
-
-Second, note the five triage stages:
-
- 1. A ticket starts as **Unreviewed**, meaning that nobody has examined
- the ticket.
-
- 2. **Design decision needed** means "this concept requires a design
- decision," which should be discussed either in the ticket comments or on
- `django-developers`_. The "Design decision needed" step will generally
- only be used for feature requests. It can also be used for issues
- that *might* be bugs, depending on opinion or interpretation. Obvious
- bugs (such as crashes, incorrect query results, or non-compliance with a
- standard) skip this step and move straight to "Accepted".
-
- 3. Once a ticket is ruled to be approved for fixing, it's moved into the
- **Accepted** stage. This stage is where all the real work gets done.
-
- 4. In some cases, a ticket might get moved to the **Someday/Maybe** state.
- This means the ticket is an enhancement request that we might consider
- adding to the framework if an excellent patch is submitted. These
- tickets are not a high priority.
-
- 5. If a ticket has an associated patch (see below), it will be reviewed
- by the community. If the patch is complete, it'll be marked as **Ready
- for checkin** so that a core developer knows to review and commit the
- patch.
-
-The second part of this workflow involves a set of flags the describe what the
-ticket has or needs in order to be "ready for checkin":
-
- "Has patch"
- This means the ticket has an associated patch_. These will be
- reviewed to see if the patch is "good".
-
- "Needs documentation"
- This flag is used for tickets with patches that need associated
- documentation. Complete documentation of features is a prerequisite
- before we can check them into the codebase.
-
- "Needs tests"
- This flags the patch as needing associated unit tests. Again, this is a
- required part of a valid patch.
-
- "Patch needs improvement"
- This flag means that although the ticket *has* a patch, it's not quite
- ready for checkin. This could mean the patch no longer applies
- cleanly, there is a flaw in the implementation, or that the code
- doesn't meet our standards.
-
-.. seealso::
-
- The :ref:`contributing howto guide <triage-stages-explained>` has a detailed
- explanation of each of the triage stages and how the triage process works in
- Trac.
-
-.. _ticket-resolutions:
-
-Ticket Resolutions
-------------------
-
-A ticket can be resolved in a number of ways:
-
- "fixed"
- Used by the core developers once a patch has been rolled into
- Django and the issue is fixed.
-
- "invalid"
- Used if the ticket is found to be incorrect. This means that the
- issue in the ticket is actually the result of a user error, or
- describes a problem with something other than Django, or isn't
- a bug report or feature request at all (for example, some new users
- submit support queries as tickets).
-
- "wontfix"
- Used when a core developer decides that this request is not
- appropriate for consideration in Django. This is usually chosen after
- discussion in the ``django-developers`` mailing list. Feel free to
- start or join in discussions of "wontfix" tickets on the mailing list,
- but please do not reopen tickets closed as "wontfix" by core
- developers.
-
- "duplicate"
- Used when another ticket covers the same issue. By closing duplicate
- tickets, we keep all the discussion in one place, which helps everyone.
-
- "worksforme"
- Used when the ticket doesn't contain enough detail to replicate
- the original bug.
-
- "needsinfo"
- Used when the ticket does not contain enough information to replicate
- the reported issue but is potentially still valid. The ticket
- should be reopened when more information is supplied.
-
-If you believe that the ticket was closed in error -- because you're
-still having the issue, or it's popped up somewhere else, or the triagers have
-made a mistake -- please reopen the ticket and provide further information.
-Please do not reopen tickets that have been marked as "wontfix" by core
-developers.
-
-.. seealso::
-
- For more information on what to do when closing a ticket, please see the
- :ref:`contributing howto guide <closing-tickets>`.
-
-.. _required details: `Reporting bugs`_
-.. _good patch: `Patch style`_
-.. _triage by the community: `Triage by the general community`_
-.. _patch: `Submitting patches`_
-
-Triage by the general community
--------------------------------
-
-Although the core developers make the big decisions in the ticket triage
-process, there's a lot that general community members can do to help the
-triage process. In particular, you can help out by:
-
- * Closing "Unreviewed" tickets as "invalid", "worksforme" or "duplicate."
-
- * Promoting "Unreviewed" tickets to "Design decision needed" if a design
- decision needs to be made, or "Accepted" in case of obvious bugs.
-
- * Correcting the "Needs tests", "Needs documentation", or "Has patch"
- flags for tickets where they are incorrectly set.
-
- * Adding the `easy-pickings`_ keyword to tickets that are small and
- relatively straightforward.
-
- * Checking that old tickets are still valid. If a ticket hasn't seen
- any activity in a long time, it's possible that the problem has been
- fixed but the ticket hasn't yet been closed.
-
- * Contacting the owners of tickets that have been claimed but have not
- seen any recent activity. If the owner doesn't respond after a week
- or so, remove the owner's claim on the ticket.
-
- * Identifying trends and themes in the tickets. If there a lot of bug
- reports about a particular part of Django, it may indicate we should
- consider refactoring that part of the code. If a trend is emerging,
- you should raise it for discussion (referencing the relevant tickets)
- on `django-developers`_.
-
-However, we do ask the following of all general community members working in
-the ticket database:
-
- * Please **don't** close tickets as "wontfix." The core developers will
- make the final determination of the fate of a ticket, usually after
- consultation with the community.
-
- * Please **don't** promote your own tickets to "Ready for checkin". You
- may mark other people's tickets which you've reviewed as "Ready for
- checkin", but you should get at minimum one other community member to
- review a patch that you submit.
-
- * Please **don't** reverse a decision that has been made by a core
- developer. If you disagree with a decision that has been made,
- please post a message to `django-developers`_.
-
- * If you're unsure if you should be making a change, don't make the change
- but instead leave a comment with your concerns on the ticket, or
- post a message to `django-developers`_. It's okay to be unsure, but
- your input is still valuable.
-
-.. _contributing-translations:
-
-Submitting and maintaining translations
-=======================================
-
-Various parts of Django, such as the admin site and validation error messages,
-are internationalized. This means they display different text depending on a
-user's language setting. For this, Django uses the same internationalization
-infrastructure available to Django applications described in the
-:doc:`i18n documentation</topics/i18n/index>`.
-
-These translations are contributed by Django users worldwide. If you find an
-incorrect translation or want to discuss specific translations, go to the
-`translation team`_ page for that language. If you would like to help out
-with translating or add a language that isn't yet translated, here's what
-to do:
-
- * Join the `Django i18n mailing list`_ and introduce yourself.
-
- * Make sure you read the notes about :ref:`specialties-of-django-i18n`.
-
- * Signup at `Transifex`_ and visit the `Django project page`_.
-
- * On the "`Translation Teams`_" page, choose the language team you want
- to work with, **or** -- in case the language team doesn't exist yet --
- request a new team by clicking on the "Request a new team" button
- and select the appropriate language.
-
- * Then, click the "Join this Team" button to become a member of this team.
- Every team has at least one coordinator who is responsible to review
- your membership request. You can of course also contact the team
- coordinator to clarify procedural problems and handle the actual
- translation process.
-
- * Once you are a member of a team choose the translation resource you
- want update on the team page. For example the "core" resource refers
- to the translation catalogue that contains all non-app translations.
- Each of the contrib apps also have a resource (prefixed with "contrib-").
-
- .. note::
- For more information about how to use Transifex, see the
- `Transifex Help`_
-
- * Optionally, review and update the ``conf/locale/<locale>/formats.py``
- file to describe the date, time and numbers formatting particularities
- of your locale. These files aren't covered by the use of Transifex and
- require a patch against the Django source tree, just as a code change
- would:
-
- * Create a diff against the current Subversion trunk.
-
- * Open a ticket in Django's ticket system, set its ``Component`` field
- to ``Translations``, and attach the patch to it. See
- :ref:`format-localization` for details.
-
-.. _Django i18n mailing list: http://groups.google.com/group/django-i18n/
-.. _Transifex: http://www.transifex.net/
-.. _Django project page: http://www.transifex.net/projects/p/django/
-.. _translation teams: http://www.transifex.net/projects/p/django/teams/
-.. _translation team: http://www.transifex.net/projects/p/django/teams/
-.. _Transifex Help: http://help.transifex.net/
-
-Submitting javascript patches
-=============================
-
-.. versionadded:: 1.2
-
-Django's admin system leverages the jQuery framework to increase the
-capabilities of the admin interface. In conjunction, there is an emphasis on
-admin javascript performance and minimizing overall admin media file size.
-Serving compressed or "minified" versions of javascript files is considered
-best practice in this regard.
-
-To that end, patches for javascript files should include both the original
-code for future development (e.g. "foo.js"), and a compressed version for
-production use (e.g. "foo.min.js"). Any links to the file in the codebase
-should point to the compressed version.
-
-To simplify the process of providing optimized javascript code, Django
-includes a handy script which should be used to create a "minified" version.
-This script is located at ``/contrib/admin/media/js/compress.py``.
-
-Behind the scenes, ``compress.py`` is a front-end for Google's
-`Closure Compiler`_ which is written in Java. However, the Closure Compiler
-library is not bundled with Django directly, so those wishing to contribute
-complete javascript patches will need to download and install the library
-independently.
-
-The Closure Compiler library requires Java version 6 or higher (Java 1.6 or
-higher on Mac OS X). Note that Mac OS X 10.5 and earlier did not ship with Java
-1.6 by default, so it may be necessary to upgrade your Java installation before
-the tool will be functional. Also note that even after upgrading Java, the
-default `/usr/bin/java` command may remain linked to the previous Java
-binary, so relinking that command may be necessary as well.
-
-Please don't forget to run ``compress.py`` and include the ``diff`` of the
-minified scripts when submitting patches for Django's javascript.
-
-.. _Closure Compiler: http://code.google.com/closure/compiler/
-
-Django conventions
-==================
-
-Various Django-specific code issues are detailed in this section.
-
-Use of ``django.conf.settings``
--------------------------------
-
-Modules should not in general use settings stored in ``django.conf.settings``
-at the top level (i.e. evaluated when the module is imported). The explanation
-for this is as follows:
-
-Manual configuration of settings (i.e. not relying on the
-``DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE`` environment variable) is allowed and possible as
-follows::
-
- from django.conf import settings
-
- settings.configure({}, SOME_SETTING='foo')
-
-However, if any setting is accessed before the ``settings.configure`` line,
-this will not work. (Internally, ``settings`` is a ``LazyObject`` which
-configures itself automatically when the settings are accessed if it has not
-already been configured).
-
-So, if there is a module containing some code as follows::
-
- from django.conf import settings
- from django.core.urlresolvers import get_callable
-
- default_foo_view = get_callable(settings.FOO_VIEW)
-
-...then importing this module will cause the settings object to be configured.
-That means that the ability for third parties to import the module at the top
-level is incompatible with the ability to configure the settings object
-manually, or makes it very difficult in some circumstances.
-
-Instead of the above code, a level of laziness or indirection must be used,
-such as `django.utils.functional.LazyObject``, ``django.utils.functional.lazy``
-or ``lambda``.
-
-Coding style
-============
-
-Please follow these coding standards when writing code for inclusion in Django:
-
- * Unless otherwise specified, follow :pep:`8`.
-
- You could use a tool like `pep8.py`_ to check for some problems in this
- area, but remember that PEP 8 is only a guide, so respect the style of
- the surrounding code as a primary goal.
-
- * Use four spaces for indentation.
-
- * Use underscores, not camelCase, for variable, function and method names
- (i.e. ``poll.get_unique_voters()``, not ``poll.getUniqueVoters``).
-
- * Use ``InitialCaps`` for class names (or for factory functions that
- return classes).
-
- * Mark all strings for internationalization; see the :doc:`i18n
- documentation </topics/i18n/index>` for details.
-
- * In docstrings, use "action words" such as::
-
- def foo():
- """
- Calculates something and returns the result.
- """
- pass
-
- Here's an example of what not to do::
-
- def foo():
- """
- Calculate something and return the result.
- """
- pass
-
- * Please don't put your name in the code you contribute. Our policy is to
- keep contributors' names in the ``AUTHORS`` file distributed with Django
- -- not scattered throughout the codebase itself. Feel free to include a
- change to the ``AUTHORS`` file in your patch if you make more than a
- single trivial change.
-
-Template style
---------------
-
- * In Django template code, put one (and only one) space between the curly
- brackets and the tag contents.
-
- Do this:
-
- .. code-block:: html+django
-
- {{ foo }}
-
- Don't do this:
-
- .. code-block:: html+django
-
- {{foo}}
-
-View style
-----------
-
- * In Django views, the first parameter in a view function should be called
- ``request``.
-
- Do this::
-
- def my_view(request, foo):
- # ...
-
- Don't do this::
-
- def my_view(req, foo):
- # ...
-
-Model style
------------
-
- * Field names should be all lowercase, using underscores instead of
- camelCase.
-
- Do this::
-
- class Person(models.Model):
- first_name = models.CharField(max_length=20)
- last_name = models.CharField(max_length=40)
-
- Don't do this::
-
- class Person(models.Model):
- FirstName = models.CharField(max_length=20)
- Last_Name = models.CharField(max_length=40)
-
- * The ``class Meta`` should appear *after* the fields are defined, with
- a single blank line separating the fields and the class definition.
-
- Do this::
-
- class Person(models.Model):
- first_name = models.CharField(max_length=20)
- last_name = models.CharField(max_length=40)
-
- class Meta:
- verbose_name_plural = 'people'
-
- Don't do this::
-
- class Person(models.Model):
- first_name = models.CharField(max_length=20)
- last_name = models.CharField(max_length=40)
- class Meta:
- verbose_name_plural = 'people'
-
- Don't do this, either::
-
- class Person(models.Model):
- class Meta:
- verbose_name_plural = 'people'
-
- first_name = models.CharField(max_length=20)
- last_name = models.CharField(max_length=40)
-
- * The order of model inner classes and standard methods should be as
- follows (noting that these are not all required):
-
- * All database fields
- * Custom manager attributes
- * ``class Meta``
- * ``def __unicode__()``
- * ``def __str__()``
- * ``def save()``
- * ``def get_absolute_url()``
- * Any custom methods
-
- * If ``choices`` is defined for a given model field, define the choices as
- a tuple of tuples, with an all-uppercase name, either near the top of the
- model module or just above the model class. Example::
-
- GENDER_CHOICES = (
- ('M', 'Male'),
- ('F', 'Female'),
- )
-
-Documentation style
-===================
-
-We place a high importance on consistency and readability of documentation.
-(After all, Django was created in a journalism environment!)
-
-How to document new features
-----------------------------
-
-We treat our documentation like we treat our code: we aim to improve it as
-often as possible. This section explains how writers can craft their
-documentation changes in the most useful and least error-prone ways.
-
-Documentation changes come in two forms:
-
- * General improvements -- Typo corrections, error fixes and better
- explanations through clearer writing and more examples.
-
- * New features -- Documentation of features that have been added to the
- framework since the last release.
-
-Our policy is:
-
- **All documentation of new features should be written in a way that clearly
- designates the features are only available in the Django development
- version. Assume documentation readers are using the latest release, not the
- development version.**
-
-Our preferred way for marking new features is by prefacing the features'
-documentation with: ".. versionadded:: X.Y", followed by an optional one line
-comment and a mandatory blank line.
-
-General improvements, or other changes to the APIs that should be emphasized
-should use the ".. versionchanged:: X.Y" directive (with the same format as the
-``versionadded`` mentioned above.
-
-There's a full page of information about the :doc:`Django documentation
-system </internals/documentation>` that you should read prior to working on the
-documentation.
-
-Guidelines for reST files
--------------------------
-
-These guidelines regulate the format of our reST documentation:
-
- * In section titles, capitalize only initial words and proper nouns.
-
- * Wrap the documentation at 80 characters wide, unless a code example
- is significantly less readable when split over two lines, or for another
- good reason.
-
-Commonly used terms
--------------------
-
-Here are some style guidelines on commonly used terms throughout the
-documentation:
-
- * **Django** -- when referring to the framework, capitalize Django. It is
- lowercase only in Python code and in the djangoproject.com logo.
-
- * **email** -- no hyphen.
-
- * **MySQL**
-
- * **PostgreSQL**
-
- * **Python** -- when referring to the language, capitalize Python.
-
- * **realize**, **customize**, **initialize**, etc. -- use the American
- "ize" suffix, not "ise."
-
- * **SQLite**
-
- * **subclass** -- it's a single word without a hyphen, both as a verb
- ("subclass that model") and as a noun ("create a subclass").
-
- * **Web**, **World Wide Web**, **the Web** -- note Web is always
- capitalized when referring to the World Wide Web.
-
- * **Web site** -- use two words, with Web capitalized.
-
-Django-specific terminology
----------------------------
-
- * **model** -- it's not capitalized.
-
- * **template** -- it's not capitalized.
-
- * **URLconf** -- use three capitalized letters, with no space before
- "conf."
-
- * **view** -- it's not capitalized.
-
-Committing code
-===============
-
-Please follow these guidelines when committing code to Django's Subversion
-repository:
-
- * For any medium-to-big changes, where "medium-to-big" is according to your
- judgment, please bring things up on the `django-developers`_ mailing list
- before making the change.
-
- If you bring something up on `django-developers`_ and nobody responds,
- please don't take that to mean your idea is great and should be
- implemented immediately because nobody contested it. Django's lead
- developers don't have a lot of time to read mailing-list discussions
- immediately, so you may have to wait a couple of days before getting a
- response.
-
- * Write detailed commit messages in the past tense, not present tense.
-
- * Good: "Fixed Unicode bug in RSS API."
- * Bad: "Fixes Unicode bug in RSS API."
- * Bad: "Fixing Unicode bug in RSS API."
-
- * For commits to a branch, prefix the commit message with the branch name.
- For example: "magic-removal: Added support for mind reading."
-
- * Limit commits to the most granular change that makes sense. This means,
- use frequent small commits rather than infrequent large commits. For
- example, if implementing feature X requires a small change to library Y,
- first commit the change to library Y, then commit feature X in a separate
- commit. This goes a *long way* in helping all core Django developers
- follow your changes.
-
- * Separate bug fixes from feature changes.
-
- Bug fixes need to be added to the current bugfix branch (e.g. the
- ``1.0.X`` branch) as well as the current trunk.
-
- * If your commit closes a ticket in the Django `ticket tracker`_, begin
- your commit message with the text "Fixed #abc", where "abc" is the number
- of the ticket your commit fixes. Example: "Fixed #123 -- Added support
- for foo". We've rigged Subversion and Trac so that any commit message
- in that format will automatically close the referenced ticket and post a
- comment to it with the full commit message.
-
- If your commit closes a ticket and is in a branch, use the branch name
- first, then the "Fixed #abc." For example:
- "magic-removal: Fixed #123 -- Added whizbang feature."
-
- For the curious: We're using a `Trac post-commit hook`_ for this.
-
- .. _Trac post-commit hook: http://trac.edgewall.org/browser/trunk/contrib/trac-post-commit-hook
-
- * If your commit references a ticket in the Django `ticket tracker`_ but
- does *not* close the ticket, include the phrase "Refs #abc", where "abc"
- is the number of the ticket your commit references. We've rigged
- Subversion and Trac so that any commit message in that format will
- automatically post a comment to the appropriate ticket.
-
-Reverting commits
------------------
-
-Nobody's perfect; mistakes will be committed. When a mistaken commit is
-discovered, please follow these guidelines:
-
- * Try very hard to ensure that mistakes don't happen. Just because we
- have a reversion policy doesn't relax your responsibility to aim for
- the highest quality possible. Really: double-check your work before
- you commit it in the first place!
-
- * If possible, have the original author revert his/her own commit.
-
- * Don't revert another author's changes without permission from the
- original author.
-
- * If the original author can't be reached (within a reasonable amount
- of time -- a day or so) and the problem is severe -- crashing bug,
- major test failures, etc -- then ask for objections on django-dev
- then revert if there are none.
-
- * If the problem is small (a feature commit after feature freeze,
- say), wait it out.
-
- * If there's a disagreement between the committer and the
- reverter-to-be then try to work it out on the `django-developers`_
- mailing list. If an agreement can't be reached then it should
- be put to a vote.
-
- * If the commit introduced a confirmed, disclosed security
- vulnerability then the commit may be reverted immediately without
- permission from anyone.
-
- * The release branch maintainer may back out commits to the release
- branch without permission if the commit breaks the release branch.
-
-.. _unit-tests:
-
-Unit tests
-==========
-
-Django comes with a test suite of its own, in the ``tests`` directory of the
-Django tarball. It's our policy to make sure all tests pass at all times.
-
-The tests cover:
-
- * Models and the database API (``tests/modeltests/``).
- * Everything else in core Django code (``tests/regressiontests``)
- * Contrib apps (``django/contrib/<contribapp>/tests``, see below)
-
-We appreciate any and all contributions to the test suite!
-
-The Django tests all use the testing infrastructure that ships with Django for
-testing applications. See :doc:`Testing Django applications </topics/testing>`
-for an explanation of how to write new tests.
-
-.. _running-unit-tests:
-
-Running the unit tests
-----------------------
-
-Quickstart
-~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Running the tests requires a Django settings module that defines the
-databases to use. To make it easy to get started. Django provides a
-sample settings module that uses the SQLite database. To run the tests
-with this sample ``settings`` module, ``cd`` into the Django
-``tests/`` directory and run:
-
-.. code-block:: bash
-
- ./runtests.py --settings=test_sqlite
-
-If you get an ``ImportError: No module named django.contrib`` error,
-you need to add your install of Django to your ``PYTHONPATH``. For
-more details on how to do this, read `Pointing Python at the new
-Django version`_ below.
-
-Using another ``settings`` module
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-The included settings module allows you to run the test suite using
-SQLite. If you want to test behavior using a different database (and
-if you're proposing patches for Django, it's a good idea to test
-across databases), you may need to define your own settings file.
-
-To run the tests with different settings, ``cd`` to the ``tests/`` directory
-and type:
-
-.. code-block:: bash
-
- ./runtests.py --settings=path.to.django.settings
-
-The :setting:`DATABASES` setting in this test settings module needs to define
-two databases:
-
- * A ``default`` database. This database should use the backend that
- you want to use for primary testing
-
- * A database with the alias ``other``. The ``other`` database is
- used to establish that queries can be directed to different
- databases. As a result, this database can use any backend you
- want. It doesn't need to use the same backend as the ``default``
- database (although it can use the same backend if you want to).
-
-If you're using a backend that isn't SQLite, you will need to provide other
-details for each database:
-
- * The :setting:`USER` option for each of your databases needs to
- specify an existing user account for the database.
-
- * The :setting:`PASSWORD` option needs to provide the password for
- the :setting:`USER` that has been specified.
-
- * The :setting:`NAME` option must be the name of an existing database to
- which the given user has permission to connect. The unit tests will not
- touch this database; the test runner creates a new database whose name is
- :setting:`NAME` prefixed with ``test_``, and this test database is
- deleted when the tests are finished. This means your user account needs
- permission to execute ``CREATE DATABASE``.
-
-You will also need to ensure that your database uses UTF-8 as the default
-character set. If your database server doesn't use UTF-8 as a default charset,
-you will need to include a value for ``TEST_CHARSET`` in the settings
-dictionary for the applicable database.
-
-Running only some of the tests
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Django's entire test suite takes a while to run, and running every single test
-could be redundant if, say, you just added a test to Django that you want to
-run quickly without running everything else. You can run a subset of the unit
-tests by appending the names of the test modules to ``runtests.py`` on the
-command line.
-
-For example, if you'd like to run tests only for generic relations and
-internationalization, type:
-
-.. code-block:: bash
-
- ./runtests.py --settings=path.to.settings generic_relations i18n
-
-How do you find out the names of individual tests? Look in ``tests/modeltests``
-and ``tests/regressiontests`` -- each directory name there is the name of a
-test.
-
-If you just want to run a particular class of tests, you can specify a list of
-paths to individual test classes. For example, to run the ``TranslationTests``
-of the ``i18n`` module, type:
-
-.. code-block:: bash
-
- ./runtests.py --settings=path.to.settings i18n.TranslationTests
-
-Going beyond that, you can specify an individual test method like this:
-
-.. code-block:: bash
-
- ./runtests.py --settings=path.to.settings i18n.TranslationTests.test_lazy_objects
-
-Running all the tests
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-If you want to run the full suite of tests, you'll need to install a number of
-dependencies:
-
- * PyYAML_
- * Markdown_
- * Textile_
- * Docutils_
- * setuptools_
- * memcached_, plus a :ref:`supported Python binding <memcached>`
- * gettext_ (:ref:`gettext_on_windows`)
-
-If you want to test the memcached cache backend, you'll also need to define
-a :setting:`CACHES` setting that points at your memcached instance.
-
-Each of these dependencies is optional. If you're missing any of them, the
-associated tests will be skipped.
-
-.. _PyYAML: http://pyyaml.org/wiki/PyYAML
-.. _Markdown: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/Markdown/1.7
-.. _Textile: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/textile
-.. _docutils: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/docutils/0.4
-.. _setuptools: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/setuptools/
-.. _memcached: http://www.danga.com/memcached/
-.. _gettext: http://www.gnu.org/software/gettext/manual/gettext.html
-
-Contrib apps
-------------
-
-Tests for apps in ``django/contrib/`` go in their respective directories under
-``django/contrib/``, in a ``tests.py`` file. (You can split the tests over
-multiple modules by using a ``tests`` directory in the normal Python way.)
-
-For the tests to be found, a ``models.py`` file must exist (it doesn't
-have to have anything in it). If you have URLs that need to be
-mapped, put them in ``tests/urls.py``.
-
-To run tests for just one contrib app (e.g. ``markup``), use the same
-method as above::
-
- ./runtests.py --settings=settings markup
-
-Requesting features
-===================
-
-We're always trying to make Django better, and your feature requests are a key
-part of that. Here are some tips on how to make a request most effectively:
-
- * Request the feature on `django-developers`_, not in the ticket tracker.
- It'll get read more closely if it's on the mailing list.
-
- * Describe clearly and concisely what the missing feature is and how you'd
- like to see it implemented. Include example code (non-functional is OK)
- if possible.
-
- * Explain *why* you'd like the feature. In some cases this is obvious, but
- since Django is designed to help real developers get real work done,
- you'll need to explain it, if it isn't obvious why the feature would be
- useful.
-
-As with most open-source projects, code talks. If you are willing to write the
-code for the feature yourself or if (even better) you've already written it,
-it's much more likely to be accepted. If it's a large feature that might need
-multiple developers, we're always happy to give you an experimental branch in
-our repository; see below.
-
-Branch policy
-=============
-
-In general, the trunk must be kept stable. People should be able to run
-production sites against the trunk at any time. Additionally, commits to trunk
-ought to be as atomic as possible -- smaller changes are better. Thus, large
-feature changes -- that is, changes too large to be encapsulated in a single
-patch, or changes that need multiple eyes on them -- must happen on dedicated
-branches.
-
-This means that if you want to work on a large feature -- anything that would
-take more than a single patch, or requires large-scale refactoring -- you need
-to do it on a feature branch. Our development process recognizes two options
-for feature branches:
-
- 1. Feature branches using a distributed revision control system like
- Git_, Mercurial_, Bazaar_, etc.
-
- If you're familiar with one of these tools, this is probably your best
- option since it doesn't require any support or buy-in from the Django
- core developers.
-
- However, do keep in mind that Django will continue to use Subversion for
- the foreseeable future, and this will naturally limit the recognition of
- your branch. Further, if your branch becomes eligible for merging to
- trunk you'll need to find a core developer familiar with your DVCS of
- choice who'll actually perform the merge.
-
- If you do decided to start a distributed branch of Django and choose to
- make it public, please add the branch to the `Django branches`_ wiki
- page.
-
- 2. Feature branches using SVN have a higher bar. If you want a branch
- in SVN itself, you'll need a "mentor" among the :doc:`core committers
- </internals/committers>`. This person is responsible for actually
- creating the branch, monitoring your process (see below), and
- ultimately merging the branch into trunk.
-
- If you want a feature branch in SVN, you'll need to ask in
- `django-developers`_ for a mentor.
-
-.. _git: http://git-scm.com/
-.. _mercurial: http://mercurial.selenic.com/
-.. _bazaar: http://bazaar.canonical.com/
-.. _django branches: http://code.djangoproject.com/wiki/DjangoBranches
-
-Branch rules
-------------
-
-We've got a few rules for branches born out of experience with what makes a
-successful Django branch.
-
-DVCS branches are obviously not under central control, so we have no way of
-enforcing these rules. However, if you're using a DVCS, following these rules
-will give you the best chance of having a successful branch (read: merged back
-to trunk).
-
-Developers with branches in SVN, however, **must** follow these rules. The
-branch mentor will keep on eye on the branch and **will delete it** if these
-rules are broken.
-
- * Only branch entire copies of the Django tree, even if work is only
- happening on part of that tree. This makes it painless to switch to a
- branch.
-
- * Merge changes from trunk no less than once a week, and preferably every
- couple-three days.
-
- In our experience, doing regular trunk merges is often the difference
- between a successful branch and one that fizzles and dies.
-
- If you're working on an SVN branch, you should be using `svnmerge.py`_
- to track merges from trunk.
-
- * Keep tests passing and documentation up-to-date. As with patches,
- we'll only merge a branch that comes with tests and documentation.
-
-.. _svnmerge.py: http://www.orcaware.com/svn/wiki/Svnmerge.py
-
-Once the branch is stable and ready to be merged into the trunk, alert
-`django-developers`_.
-
-After a branch has been merged, it should be considered "dead"; write access to
-it will be disabled, and old branches will be periodically "trimmed." To keep
-our SVN wrangling to a minimum, we won't be merging from a given branch into
-the trunk more than once.
-
-Using branches
---------------
-
-To use a branch, you'll need to do two things:
-
- * Get the branch's code through Subversion.
-
- * Point your Python ``site-packages`` directory at the branch's version of
- the ``django`` package rather than the version you already have
- installed.
-
-Getting the code from Subversion
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-To get the latest version of a branch's code, check it out using Subversion:
-
-.. code-block:: bash
-
- svn co http://code.djangoproject.com/svn/django/branches/<branch>/
-
-...where ``<branch>`` is the branch's name. See the `list of branch names`_.
-
-Alternatively, you can automatically convert an existing directory of the
-Django source code as long as you've checked it out via Subversion. To do the
-conversion, execute this command from within your ``django`` directory:
-
-.. code-block:: bash
-
- svn switch http://code.djangoproject.com/svn/django/branches/<branch>/
-
-The advantage of using ``svn switch`` instead of ``svn co`` is that the
-``switch`` command retains any changes you might have made to your local copy
-of the code. It attempts to merge those changes into the "switched" code. The
-disadvantage is that it may cause conflicts with your local changes if the
-"switched" code has altered the same lines of code.
-
-(Note that if you use ``svn switch``, you don't need to point Python at the new
-version, as explained in the next section.)
-
-.. _list of branch names: http://code.djangoproject.com/browser/django/branches
-
-Pointing Python at the new Django version
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Once you've retrieved the branch's code, you'll need to change your Python
-``site-packages`` directory so that it points to the branch version of the
-``django`` directory. (The ``site-packages`` directory is somewhere such as
-``/usr/lib/python2.4/site-packages`` or
-``/usr/local/lib/python2.4/site-packages`` or ``C:\Python\site-packages``.)
-
-The simplest way to do this is by renaming the old ``django`` directory to
-``django.OLD`` and moving the trunk version of the code into the directory
-and calling it ``django``.
-
-Alternatively, you can use a symlink called ``django`` that points to the
-location of the branch's ``django`` package. If you want to switch back, just
-change the symlink to point to the old code.
-
-A third option is to use a `path file`_ (``<something>.pth``) which should
-work on all systems (including Windows, which doesn't have symlinks
-available). First, make sure there are no files, directories or symlinks named
-``django`` in your ``site-packages`` directory. Then create a text file named
-``django.pth`` and save it to your ``site-packages`` directory. That file
-should contain a path to your copy of Django on a single line and optional
-comments. Here is an example that points to multiple branches. Just uncomment
-the line for the branch you want to use ('Trunk' in this example) and make
-sure all other lines are commented::
-
- # Trunk is a svn checkout of:
- # http://code.djangoproject.com/svn/django/trunk/
- #
- /path/to/trunk
-
- # <branch> is a svn checkout of:
- # http://code.djangoproject.com/svn/django/branches/<branch>/
- #
- #/path/to/<branch>
-
- # On windows a path may look like this:
- # C:/path/to/<branch>
-
-If you're using Django 0.95 or earlier and installed it using
-``python setup.py install``, you'll have a directory called something like
-``Django-0.95-py2.4.egg`` instead of ``django``. In this case, edit the file
-``setuptools.pth`` and remove the line that references the Django ``.egg``
-file. Then copy the branch's version of the ``django`` directory into
-``site-packages``.
-
-.. _path file: http://docs.python.org/library/site.html
-
-How we make decisions
-=====================
-
-Whenever possible, we strive for a rough consensus. To that end, we'll often
-have informal votes on `django-developers`_ about a feature. In these votes we
-follow the voting style invented by Apache and used on Python itself, where
-votes are given as +1, +0, -0, or -1. Roughly translated, these votes mean:
-
- * +1: "I love the idea and I'm strongly committed to it."
-
- * +0: "Sounds OK to me."
-
- * -0: "I'm not thrilled, but I won't stand in the way."
-
- * -1: "I strongly disagree and would be very unhappy to see the idea turn
- into reality."
-
-Although these votes on django-developers are informal, they'll be taken very
-seriously. After a suitable voting period, if an obvious consensus arises
-we'll follow the votes.
-
-However, consensus is not always possible. If consensus cannot be reached, or
-if the discussion towards a consensus fizzles out without a concrete decision,
-we use a more formal process.
-
-Any core committer (see below) may call for a formal vote using the same
-voting mechanism above. A proposition will be considered carried by the core
-team if:
-
- * There are three "+1" votes from members of the core team.
-
- * There is no "-1" vote from any member of the core team.
-
- * The BDFLs haven't stepped in and executed their positive or negative
- veto.
-
-When calling for a vote, the caller should specify a deadline by which
-votes must be received. One week is generally suggested as the minimum
-amount of time.
-
-Since this process allows any core committer to veto a proposal, any "-1"
-votes (or BDFL vetos) should be accompanied by an explanation that explains
-what it would take to convert that "-1" into at least a "+0".
-
-Whenever possible, these formal votes should be announced and held in
-public on the `django-developers`_ mailing list. However, overly sensitive
-or contentious issues -- including, most notably, votes on new core
-committers -- may be held in private.
-
-Commit access
-=============
-
-Django has two types of committers:
-
-Core committers
- These are people who have a long history of contributions to Django's
- codebase, a solid track record of being polite and helpful on the
- mailing lists, and a proven desire to dedicate serious time to Django's
- development. The bar is high for full commit access.
-
-Partial committers
- These are people who are "domain experts." They have direct check-in access
- to the subsystems that fall under their jurisdiction, and they're given a
- formal vote in questions that involve their subsystems. This type of access
- is likely to be given to someone who contributes a large subframework to
- Django and wants to continue to maintain it.
-
- Partial commit access is granted by the same process as full
- committers. However, the bar is set lower; proven expertise in the area
- in question is likely to be sufficient.
-
-Decisions on new committers will follow the process explained above in `how
-we make decisions`_.
-
-To request commit access, please contact an existing committer privately.
-Public requests for commit access are potential flame-war starters, and
-will be ignored.
-
-.. _community page: http://www.djangoproject.com/community/
-.. _ticket tracker: http://code.djangoproject.com/newticket
-.. _django-developers: http://groups.google.com/group/django-developers
-.. _search the tracker: http://code.djangoproject.com/search
-.. _django-users: http://groups.google.com/group/django-users
-.. _`#django`: irc://irc.freenode.net/django
-.. _list of tickets with patches: http://code.djangoproject.com/query?status=new&status=assigned&status=reopened&has_patch=1&order=priority
-.. _pep8.py: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/pep8/
-.. _i18n branch: http://code.djangoproject.com/browser/django/branches/i18n
-.. _`tags/releases`: http://code.djangoproject.com/browser/django/tags/releases
-.. _`easy-pickings`: http://code.djangoproject.com/query?status=new&status=assigned&status=reopened&keywords=~easy-pickings&order=priority
View
181 docs/internals/contributing/bugs-and-features.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,181 @@
+======================================
+Reporting bugs and requesting features
+======================================
+
+Before reporting a bug or requesting a new feature please consider these
+general points:
+
+* Check that someone hasn't already filed the bug or feature request by
+ `searching`_ or running `custom queries`_ in the ticket tracker.
+
+* Don't use the ticket system to ask support questions. Use the
+ `django-users`_ list, or the `#django`_ IRC channel for that.
+
+* Don't reopen issues that have been marked "wontfix" by a core developer.
+ This mark means that the decision has been made that we can't or won't fix
+ this particular issue. If you're not sure why, please ask
+ on `django-developers`_.
+
+* Don't use the ticket tracker for lengthy discussions, because they're
+ likely to get lost. If a particular ticket is controversial, please move
+ discussion to `django-developers`_.
+
+.. _reporting-bugs:
+
+Reporting bugs
+--------------
+
+Well-written bug reports are *incredibly* helpful. However, there's a certain
+amount of overhead involved in working with any bug tracking system so your
+help in keeping our ticket tracker as useful as possible is appreciated. In
+particular:
+
+ * **Do** read the :doc:`FAQ </faq/index>` to see if your issue might
+ be a well-known question.
+
+ * **Do** ask on `django-users`_ *first* if you're not sure if what you're
+ seeing is a bug.
+
+ * **Do** write complete, reproducible, specific bug reports. Include as
+ much information as you possibly can, complete with code snippets, test
+ cases, etc. This means including a clear, concise description of the
+ problem, and a clear set of instructions for replicating the problem.
+ A minimal example that illustrates the bug in a nice small test case
+ is the best possible bug report.
+
+ * **Don't** post to django-developers just to announce that you have filed
+ a bug report. All the tickets are mailed to another list
+ (`django-updates`_), which is tracked by developers and interested
+ community members; we see them as they are filed.
+
+To understand the lifecycle of your ticket once you have created it, refer to
+:doc:`triaging-tickets`.
+
+.. _django-updates: http://groups.google.com/group/django-updates
+
+.. _reporting-security-issues:
+
+Reporting security issues
+-------------------------
+
+.. Important::
+
+ Please report security issues **only** to security@djangoproject.com.
+ This is a private list only open to long-time, highly trusted Django
+ developers, and its archives are not publicly readable.
+
+In the event of a confirmed vulnerability in Django itself, we will take the
+following actions:
+
+ * Acknowledge to the reporter that we've received the report and that a
+ fix is forthcoming. We'll give a rough timeline and ask the reporter
+ to keep the issue confidential until we announce it.
+
+ * Focus on developing a fix as quickly as possible and produce patches
+ against the current and two previous releases.
+
+ * Determine a go-public date for announcing the vulnerability and the fix.
+ To try to mitigate a possible "arms race" between those applying the
+ patch and those trying to exploit the hole, we will not announce
+ security problems immediately.
+
+ * Pre-notify third-party distributors of Django ("vendors"). We will send
+ these vendor notifications through private email which will include
+ documentation of the vulnerability, links to the relevant patch(es), and
+ a request to keep the vulnerability confidential until the official
+ go-public date.
+
+ * Publicly announce the vulnerability and the fix on the pre-determined
+ go-public date. This will probably mean a new release of Django, but
+ in some cases it may simply be patches against current releases.
+
+Requesting features
+-------------------
+
+We're always trying to make Django better, and your feature requests are a key
+part of that. Here are some tips on how to make a request most effectively:
+
+ * First request the feature on `django-developers`_, not in the ticket
+ tracker. It'll get read more closely if it's on the mailing list.
+
+ * Describe clearly and concisely what the missing feature is and how you'd
+ like to see it implemented. Include example code (non-functional is OK)
+ if possible.
+
+ * Explain *why* you'd like the feature. In some cases this is obvious, but
+ since Django is designed to help real developers get real work done,
+ you'll need to explain it, if it isn't obvious why the feature would be
+ useful.
+
+ * Don't use the ticket system to make large-scale feature requests.
+ We like to discuss any big changes to Django's core on the
+ `django-developers`_ list before actually working on them.
+
+As with most open-source projects, code talks. If you are willing to write the
+code for the feature yourself or if (even better) you've already written it,
+it's much more likely to be accepted. If it's a large feature that might need
+multiple developers, we're always happy to give you an experimental branch in
+our repository; see the :doc:`writing-code/branch-policy`.
+
+To understand the lifecycle of your ticket once you have created it, refer to
+:doc:`triaging-tickets`.
+
+See also: :ref:`documenting-new-features`.
+
+.. _how-we-make-decisions:
+
+How we make decisions
+---------------------
+
+Whenever possible, we strive for a rough consensus. To that end, we'll often
+have informal votes on `django-developers`_ about a feature. In these votes we
+follow the voting style invented by Apache and used on Python itself, where
+votes are given as +1, +0, -0, or -1. Roughly translated, these votes mean:
+
+ * +1: "I love the idea and I'm strongly committed to it."
+
+ * +0: "Sounds OK to me."
+
+ * -0: "I'm not thrilled, but I won't stand in the way."
+
+ * -1: "I strongly disagree and would be very unhappy to see the idea turn
+ into reality."
+
+Although these votes on django-developers are informal, they'll be taken very
+seriously. After a suitable voting period, if an obvious consensus arises
+we'll follow the votes.
+
+However, consensus is not always possible. If consensus cannot be reached, or
+if the discussion towards a consensus fizzles out without a concrete decision,
+we use a more formal process.
+
+Any :doc:`core committer</internals/committers>` may call for a formal vote
+using the same voting mechanism above. A proposition will be considered carried
+by the core team if:
+
+ * There are three "+1" votes from members of the core team.
+
+ * There is no "-1" vote from any member of the core team.
+
+ * The :ref:`BDFLs<django-bdfls>` haven't stepped in and executed their
+ positive or negative veto.
+
+When calling for a vote, the caller should specify a deadline by which
+votes must be received. One week is generally suggested as the minimum
+amount of time.
+
+Since this process allows any core committer to veto a proposal, any "-1"
+votes (or BDFL vetos) should be accompanied by an explanation that explains
+what it would take to convert that "-1" into at least a "+0".
+
+Whenever possible, these formal votes should be announced and held in
+public on the `django-developers`_ mailing list. However, overly sensitive
+or contentious issues -- including, most notably, votes on new core
+committers -- may be held in private.
+
+
+.. _searching: http://code.djangoproject.com/search
+.. _`custom queries`: https://code.djangoproject.com/query
+.. _django-developers: http://groups.google.com/group/django-developers
+.. _django-users: http://groups.google.com/group/django-users
+.. _`#django`: irc://irc.freenode.net/django
View
133 docs/internals/contributing/committing-code.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,133 @@
+===============
+Committing code
+===============
+
+This section is addressed to the :doc:`/internals/committers` and to anyone
+interested in knowing how code gets committed into Django core.
+
+Commit access
+-------------
+
+Django has two types of committers:
+
+Core committers
+ These are people who have a long history of contributions to Django's
+ codebase, a solid track record of being polite and helpful on the
+ mailing lists, and a proven desire to dedicate serious time to Django's
+ development. The bar is high for full commit access.
+
+Partial committers
+ These are people who are "domain experts." They have direct check-in
+ access to the subsystems that fall under their jurisdiction, and they're
+ given a formal vote in questions that involve their subsystems. This type
+ of access is likely to be given to someone who contributes a large
+ subframework to Django and wants to continue to maintain it.
+
+ Partial commit access is granted by the same process as full
+ committers. However, the bar is set lower; proven expertise in the area
+ in question is likely to be sufficient.
+
+Decisions on new committers will follow the process explained in
+:ref:`how-we-make-decisions`.
+
+To request commit access, please contact an existing committer privately.
+Public requests for commit access are potential flame-war starters, and
+will be ignored.
+
+Committing guidelines
+---------------------
+
+Please follow these guidelines when committing code to Django's Subversion
+repository:
+
+ * For any medium-to-big changes, where "medium-to-big" is according to
+ your judgment, please bring things up on the `django-developers`_
+ mailing list before making the change.
+
+ If you bring something up on `django-developers`_ and nobody responds,
+ please don't take that to mean your idea is great and should be
+ implemented immediately because nobody contested it. Django's lead
+ developers don't have a lot of time to read mailing-list discussions
+ immediately, so you may have to wait a couple of days before getting a
+ response.
+
+ * Write detailed commit messages in the past tense, not present tense.
+
+ * Good: "Fixed Unicode bug in RSS API."
+ * Bad: "Fixes Unicode bug in RSS API."
+ * Bad: "Fixing Unicode bug in RSS API."
+
+ * For commits to a branch, prefix the commit message with the branch name.
+ For example: "magic-removal: Added support for mind reading."
+
+ * Limit commits to the most granular change that makes sense. This means,
+ use frequent small commits rather than infrequent large commits. For
+ example, if implementing feature X requires a small change to library Y,
+ first commit the change to library Y, then commit feature X in a
+ separate commit. This goes a *long way* in helping all core Django
+ developers follow your changes.
+
+ * Separate bug fixes from feature changes.
+
+ Bug fixes need to be added to the current bugfix branch (e.g. the
+ ``1.0.X`` branch) as well as the current trunk.
+
+ * If your commit closes a ticket in the Django `ticket tracker`_, begin
+ your commit message with the text "Fixed #abc", where "abc" is the
+ number of the ticket your commit fixes. Example: "Fixed #123 -- Adde
+ support for foo". We've rigged Subversion and Trac so that any commit
+ message in that format will automatically close the referenced ticket
+ and post a comment to it with the full commit message.
+
+ If your commit closes a ticket and is in a branch, use the branch name
+ first, then the "Fixed #abc." For example:
+ "magic-removal: Fixed #123 -- Added whizbang feature."
+
+ For the curious: We're using a `Trac post-commit hook`_ for this.
+
+ .. _Trac post-commit hook: http://trac.edgewall.org/browser/trunk/contrib/trac-post-commit-hook
+
+ * If your commit references a ticket in the Django `ticket tracker`_ but
+ does *not* close the ticket, include the phrase "Refs #abc", where "abc"
+ is the number of the ticket your commit references. We've rigged
+ Subversion and Trac so that any commit message in that format will
+ automatically post a comment to the appropriate ticket.
+
+Reverting commits
+-----------------
+
+Nobody's perfect; mistakes will be committed. When a mistaken commit is
+discovered, please follow these guidelines:
+
+ * Try very hard to ensure that mistakes don't happen. Just because we
+ have a reversion policy doesn't relax your responsibility to aim for
+ the highest quality possible. Really: double-check your work before
+ you commit it in the first place!
+
+ * If possible, have the original author revert his/her own commit.
+
+ * Don't revert another author's changes without permission from the
+ original author.
+
+ * If the original author can't be reached (within a reasonable amount
+ of time -- a day or so) and the problem is severe -- crashing bug,
+ major test failures, etc -- then ask for objections on django-dev
+ then revert if there are none.
+
+ * If the problem is small (a feature commit after feature freeze,
+ say), wait it out.
+
+ * If there's a disagreement between the committer and the
+ reverter-to-be then try to work it out on the `django-developers`_
+ mailing list. If an agreement can't be reached then it should
+ be put to a vote.
+
+ * If the commit introduced a confirmed, disclosed security
+ vulnerability then the commit may be reverted immediately without
+ permission from anyone.
+
+ * The release branch maintainer may back out commits to the release
+ branch without permission if the commit breaks the release branch.
+
+.. _django-developers: http://groups.google.com/group/django-developers
+.. _ticket tracker: http://code.djangoproject.com/newticket
View
48 docs/internals/contributing/index.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,48 @@
+======================
+Contributing to Django
+======================
+
+If you think working *with* Django is fun, wait until you start working *on*
+it. We're passionate about helping Django users make the jump to contributing
+members of the community, so there are several ways you can help Django's
+development:
+
+ * Blog about Django. We syndicate all the Django blogs we know about on
+ the `community page`_; if you'd like to see your blog on that page you
+ can `register it here`_.
+
+ * :doc:`Report bugs and request features<bugs-and-features>` in our
+ `ticket tracker`_.
+
+ * Join the `django-developers`_ mailing list and share your ideas for how
+ to improve Django. We're always open to suggestions.
+
+ * :doc:`Submit patches<writing-code/submitting-patches>` for new and/or
+ fixed behavior. If you're looking for an easy way to start contributing
+ to Django have a look at the `easy pickings`_ tickets.
+
+ * :doc:`Improve the documentation<writing-documentation>` or
+ :doc:`write unit tests<writing-code/unit-tests>`.
+
+ * :doc:`Triage tickets<triaging-tickets>` that have been created by other
+ users.
+
+... and many more ways! Really, **ANYONE** can do something to help make
+Django better and greater. Browse the following sections to find out how:
+
+.. toctree::
+ :maxdepth: 2
+
+ new-contributors
+ bugs-and-features
+ triaging-tickets
+ writing-code/index
+ writing-documentation
+ translations
+ committing-code
+
+.. _django-developers: http://groups.google.com/group/django-developers
+.. _ticket tracker: http://code.djangoproject.com/newticket
+.. _community page: http://www.djangoproject.com/community/
+.. _`easy pickings`: http://code.djangoproject.com/query?status=!closed&easy=1
+.. _`register it here`: http://www.djangoproject.com/community/add/blogs/
View
137 docs/internals/contributing/new-contributors.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,137 @@
+===========================
+Advice for new contributors
+===========================
+
+New contributor and not sure what to do? Want to help but just don't know how
+to get started? This is the section for you.
+
+* **Pick a subject area that you care about, that you are familiar with, or
+ that you want to learn about**
+
+ You don't already have to be an expert on the area you want to work on; you
+ become an expert through your ongoing contributions to the code.
+
+* **Triage tickets**
+
+ If a ticket is unreviewed and reports a bug, try and reproduce it. If you
+ can reproduce it and it seems valid, make a note that you confirmed the bug
+ and accept the ticket. Make sure the ticket is filed under the correct
+ component area. Consider writing a patch that adds a test for the bug's
+ behavior, even if you don't fix the bug itself. See more at
+ :ref:`how-can-i-help-with-triaging`
+
+* **Look for tickets that are accepted and review patches to build familiarity
+ with the codebase and the process**
+
+ Mark the appropriate flags if a patch needs docs or tests. Look through the
+ changes a patch makes, and keep an eye out for syntax that is incompatible
+ with older but still supported versions of Python. Run the tests and make
+ sure they pass on your system. Where possible and relevant, try them out on
+ a database other than SQLite. Leave comments and feedback!
+
+* **Keep old patches up to date**
+
+ Oftentimes the codebase will change between a patch being submitted and the
+ time it gets reviewed. Make sure it still applies cleanly and functions as
+ expected. Simply updating a patch is both useful and important! See more on
+ :doc:`writing-code/submitting-patches`.
+
+* **Write some documentation**
+
+ Django's documentation is great but it can always be improved. Did you find
+ a typo? Do you think that something should be clarified? Go ahead and
+ suggest a documentation patch! See also the guide on
+ :doc:`writing-documentation`, in particular the tips for
+ :ref:`improving-the-documentation`.
+
+* **Analyze the ticket's context and history**
+
+ Trac isn't an absolute; the context is just as important as the words.
+ When reading Trac, you need to take into account who says things, and when
+ they were said. Support for an idea two years ago doesn't necessarily mean
+ that the idea will still have support. You also need to pay attention to who
+ *hasn't* spoken -- for example, if a core team member hasn't been recently
+ involved in a discussion, then a ticket may not have the support required to
+ get into trunk.
+
+* **Start small**
+
+ It's easier to get feedback on a little issue than on a big one. See the
+ `easy pickings`_.
+
+* **If you're going to engage in a big task, make sure that your idea has
+ support first**
+
+ This means getting someone else to confirm that a bug is real before you fix
+ the issue, and ensuring that the core team supports a proposed feature
+ before you go implementing it.
+
+* **Be bold! Leave feedback!**
+
+ Sometimes it can be scary to put your opinion out to the world and say "this
+ ticket is correct" or "this patch needs work", but it's the only way the
+ project moves forward. The contributions of the broad Django community
+ ultimately have a much greater impact than that of the core developers. We
+ can't do it without YOU!
+
+* **Err on the side of caution when marking things Ready For Check-in**
+
+ If you're really not certain if a ticket is ready, don't mark it as
+ such. Leave a comment instead, letting others know your thoughts. If you're
+ mostly certain, but not completely certain, you might also try asking on IRC
+ to see if someone else can confirm your suspicions.
+
+* **Wait for feedback, and respond to feedback that you receive**
+
+ Focus on one or two tickets, see them through from start to finish, and
+ repeat. The shotgun approach of taking on lots of tickets and letting some
+ fall by the wayside ends up doing more harm than good.
+
+* **Be rigorous**
+
+ When we say ":pep:`8`, and must have docs and tests", we mean it. If a patch
+ doesn't have docs and tests, there had better be a good reason. Arguments
+ like "I couldn't find any existing tests of this feature" don't carry much
+ weight--while it may be true, that means you have the extra-important job of
+ writing the very first tests for that feature, not that you get a pass from
+ writing tests altogether.
+
+.. note::
+
+ The `Reports page`_ contains links to many useful Trac queries, including
+ several that are useful for triaging tickets and reviewing patches as
+ suggested above.
+
+ .. _Reports page: http://code.djangoproject.com/wiki/Reports
+
+.. _new-contributors-faq:
+
+FAQ
+---
+
+1. **This ticket I care about has been ignored for days/weeks/months! What can
+ I do to get it committed?**
+
+ First off, it's not personal. Django is entirely developed by volunteers
+ (even the core developers), and sometimes folks just don't have time. The
+ best thing to do is to send a gentle reminder to the Django Developers
+ mailing list asking for review on the ticket, or to bring it up in the
+ #django-dev IRC channel.
+
+2. **I'm sure my ticket is absolutely 100% perfect, can I mark it as RFC
+ myself?**
+
+ Short answer: No. It's always better to get another set of eyes on a
+ ticket. If you're having trouble getting that second set of eyes, see
+ question 1, above.
+
+3. **My ticket has been in DDN forever! What should I do?**
+
+ Design Decision Needed requires consensus about the right solution. At the
+ very least it needs consensus among the core developers, and ideally it has
+ consensus from the community as well. The best way to accomplish this is to
+ start a thread on the Django Developers mailing list, and for very complex
+ issues to start a wiki page summarizing the problem and the possible
+ solutions.
+
+.. _`easy pickings`: http://code.djangoproject.com/query?status=!closed&easy=1
View
60 docs/internals/contributing/translations.txt
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+=======================================
+Submitting and maintaining translations
+=======================================
+
+Various parts of Django, such as the admin site and validation error messages,
+are internationalized. This means they display different text depending on a
+user's language setting. For this, Django uses the same internationalization
+infrastructure available to Django applications described in the
+:doc:`i18n documentation</topics/i18n/index>`.
+
+These translations are contributed by Django users worldwide. If you find an
+incorrect translation or want to discuss specific translations, go to the
+`translation team`_ page for that language. If you would like to help out
+with translating or add a language that isn't yet translated, here's what
+to do:
+
+ * Join the `Django i18n mailing list`_ and introduce yourself.
+
+ * Make sure you read the notes about :ref:`specialties-of-django-i18n`.
+
+ * Signup at `Transifex`_ and visit the `Django project page`_.
+
+ * On the "`Translation Teams`_" page, choose the language team you want
+ to work with, **or** -- in case the language team doesn't exist yet --
+ request a new team by clicking on the "Request a new team" button
+ and select the appropriate language.
+
+ * Then, click the "Join this Team" button to become a member of this team.
+ Every team has at least one coordinator who is responsible to review
+ your membership request. You can of course also contact the team
+ coordinator to clarify procedural problems and handle the actual
+ translation process.
+
+ * Once you are a member of a team choose the translation resource you
+ want to update on the team page. For example the "core" resource refers
+ to the translation catalogue that contains all non-contrib translations.
+ Each of the contrib apps also have a resource (prefixed with "contrib").
+
+ .. note::
+ For more information about how to use Transifex, see the
+ `Transifex Help`_
+
+ * Optionally, review and update the ``conf/locale/<locale>/formats.py``
+ file to describe the date, time and numbers formatting particularities
+ of your locale. These files aren't covered by the use of Transifex and
+ require a patch against the Django source tree, just as a code change
+ would:
+
+ * Create a diff against the current Subversion trunk.
+
+ * Open a ticket in Django's ticket system, set its ``Component`` field
+ to ``Translations``, and attach the patch to it. See
+ :ref:`format-localization` for details.
+
+.. _Django i18n mailing list: http://groups.google.com/group/django-i18n/
+.. _Transifex: http://www.transifex.net/
+.. _Django project page: http://www.transifex.net/projects/p/django/
+.. _translation teams: http://www.transifex.net/projects/p/django/teams/
+.. _translation team: http://www.transifex.net/projects/p/django/teams/
+.. _Transifex Help: http://help.transifex.net/
View
389 docs/internals/contributing/triaging-tickets.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,389 @@
+================
+Triaging tickets
+================
+
+Django uses Trac_ for managing our progress, and Trac is a community-tended
+garden of the bugs people have found and the features people would like to see
+added. As in any garden, sometimes there are weeds to be pulled and sometimes
+there are flowers and vegetables that need picking. We need your help to sort
+out one from the other, and in the end we all benefit together.
+
+Like all gardens, we can aspire to perfection but in reality there's no such
+thing. Even in the most pristine garden there are still snails and insects.
+In a community garden there are also helpful people who--with the best of
+intentions--fertilize the weeds and poison the roses. It's the job of the
+community as a whole to self-manage, keep the problems to a minimum, and
+educate those coming into the community so that they can become valuable
+contributing members.
+
+Similarly, while we aim for Trac to be a perfect representation of the state
+of Django's progress, we acknowledge that this simply will not happen. By
+distributing the load of Trac maintenance to the community, we accept that
+there will be mistakes. Trac is "mostly accurate", and we give allowances for
+the fact that sometimes it will be wrong. That's okay. We're perfectionists
+with deadlines.
+
+We rely on the community to keep participating, keep tickets as accurate as
+possible, and raise issues for discussion on our mailing lists when there is
+confusion or disagreement.
+
+Django is a community project, and every contribution helps. We can't do this
+without YOU!
+
+Triage workflow
+---------------
+
+Unfortunately, not all bug reports and feature requests in the ticket tracker
+provide all the :doc:`required details<bugs-and-features>`. A number of
+tickets have patches, but those patches don't meet all the requirements of a
+:ref:`good patch<patch-style>`.
+
+One way to help out is to *triage* tickets that have been created by other
+users. The core team--as well as many community members--work on this
+regularly, but more help is always appreciated.
+
+Most of the workflow is based around the concept of a ticket's
+:ref:`triage stages <triage-stages>`. Each stage describes where in its
+lifetime a given ticket is at any time. Along with a handful of flags, this
+attribute easily tells us what and who each ticket is waiting on.
+
+Since a picture is worth a thousand words, let's start there:
+
+.. image:: /internals/_images/djangotickets.png
+ :height: 451
+ :width: 590
+ :alt: Django's ticket triage workflow
+
+We've got two roles in this diagram:
+
+ * :doc:`Committers</internals/committers>` (also called core developers):
+ people with commit access who are responsible for making the big
+ decisions, writing large portions of the code and integrating the
+ contributions of the community.
+
+ * Ticket triagers: anyone in the Django community who chooses to
+ become involved in Django's development process. Our Trac installation
+ is intentionally left open to the public, and anyone can triage tickets.
+ Django is a community project, and we encourage :ref:`triage by the
+ community<how-can-i-help-with-triaging>`.
+
+By way of example, here we see the lifecycle of an average ticket:
+
+* Alice creates a ticket, and uploads an incomplete patch (no tests, incorrect
+ implementation).
+
+* Bob reviews the patch, marks it "Accepted", "needs tests", and "patch needs
+ improvement", and leaves a comment telling Alice how the patch could be
+ improved.
+
+* Alice updates the patch, adding tests (but not changing the
+ implementation). She removes the two flags.
+
+* Charlie reviews the patch and resets the "patch needs improvement" flag with
+ another comment about improving the implementation.
+
+* Alice updates the patch, fixing the implementation. She removes the "patch
+ needs improvement" flag.
+
+* Daisy reviews the patch, and marks it RFC.
+
+* Jacob, a core developer, reviews the RFC patch, applies it to his checkout,
+ and commits it.
+
+Some tickets require much less feedback than this, but then again some tickets
+require much much more.
+
+.. _triage-stages:
+
+Triage stages
+-------------
+
+Below we describe in more detail the various stages that a ticket may flow
+through during its lifetime.
+
+Unreviewed
+~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The ticket has not been reviewed by anyone who felt qualified to make a
+judgment about whether the ticket contained a valid issue, a viable feature,
+or ought to be closed for any of the various reasons.
+
+Accepted
+~~~~~~~~
+
+The big grey area! The absolute meaning of "accepted" is that the issue
+described in the ticket is valid and is in some stage of being worked on.
+Beyond that there are several considerations:
+
+* **Accepted + No Flags**
+
+ The ticket is valid, but no one has submitted a patch for it yet. Often this
+ means you could safely start writing a patch for it.
+
+* **Accepted + Has Patch**
+
+ The ticket is waiting for people to review the supplied patch. This means
+ downloading the patch and trying it out, verifying that it contains tests
+ and docs, running the test suite with the included patch, and leaving
+ feedback on the ticket.
+
+* **Accepted + Has Patch + (any other flag)**
+
+ This means the ticket has been reviewed, and has been found to need further
+ work. "Needs tests" and "Needs documentation" are self-explanatory. "Patch
+ needs improvement" will generally be accompanied by a comment on the ticket
+ explaining what is needed to improve the code.
+
+Design Decision Needed
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This stage is for issues which may be contentious, may be backwards
+incompatible, or otherwise involve high-level design decisions. These issues
+should be discussed either in the ticket comments or on `django-developers`_.
+
+If a ticket has been marked as "DDN", decisions are generally eventually
+made by the core committers, however that is not a requirement. See the
+:ref:`New contributors' FAQ<new-contributors-faq>` for "My ticket has been in
+DDN forever! What should I do?"
+
+This stage will generally only be used for feature
+requests. It can also be used for issues that *might* be bugs, depending on
+opinion or interpretation. Obvious bugs (such as crashes, incorrect query
+results, or non-compliance with a standard) skip this stage and move straight
+to "Accepted".
+
+Ready For Checkin
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The ticket was reviewed by any member of the community other than the person
+who supplied the patch and found to meet all the requirements for a
+commit-ready patch. A core committer now needs to give the patch a final
+review prior to being committed. See the
+:ref:`New contributors' FAQ<new-contributors-faq>` for "My ticket has been in
+RFC forever! What should I do?"
+
+Someday/Maybe
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Generally only used for vague/high-level features or design ideas. These
+tickets are uncommon and overall less useful since they don't describe
+concrete actionable issues. They are enhancement requests that we might
+consider adding someday to the framework if an excellent patch is submitted.
+These tickets are not a high priority.
+
+Fixed on a branch
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Used to indicate that a ticket is resolved as part of a major body of work
+that will eventually be merged to trunk. Tickets in this stage generally
+don't need further work. This may happen in the case of major
+features/refactors in each release cycle, or as part of the annual Google
+Summer of Code efforts.
+
+Other triage attributes
+-----------------------
+
+A number of flags, appearing as checkboxes in Trac, can be set on a ticket:
+
+ * Has patch
+ This means the ticket has an associated
+ :doc:`patch<writing-code/submitting-patches>`. These will be reviewed
+ to see if the patch is "good".
+ * Needs documentation:
+ This flag is used for tickets with patches that need associated
+ documentation. Complete documentation of features is a prerequisite
+ before we can check them into the codebase.
+ * Needs tests
+ This flags the patch as needing associated unit tests. Again, this
+ is a required part of a valid patch.
+ * Patch needs improvement
+ This flag means that although the ticket *has* a patch, it's not quite
+ ready for checkin. This could mean the patch no longer applies
+ cleanly, there is a flaw in the implementation, or that the code
+ doesn't meet our standards."
+ * Easy pickings
+ Tickets that would require small, easy, patches.
+
+Tickets should be categorized by *type* between:
+
+ * New Feature
+ For adding something new.
+
+ * Bug
+ For when an existing thing is broken or not behaving as expected.
+
+ * Cleanup/optimization
+ For when nothing is broken but something could be made cleaner,
+ better, faster, stronger.
+
+Tickets should also be classified into *components* indicating which area of
+the Django codebase they belong to. This makes tickets better organized and
+easier to find.
+
+The *severity* attribute is used to identify blockers, that is, issues which
+should get fixed before releasing the next version of Django. Typically those
+issues are bugs causing regressions from earlier versions or potentially
+causing severe data losses. This attribute is quite rarely used and the vast
+majority of tickets have a severity of "Normal".
+
+Finally, it is possible to use the *version* attribute to indicate in which
+version the reported bug was identified.
+
+.. _closing-tickets:
+
+Closing Tickets
+---------------
+
+When a ticket has completed its useful lifecycle, it's time for it to be
+closed. Closing a ticket is a big responsibility, though. You have to be sure
+that the issue is really resolved, and you need to keep in mind that the
+reporter of the ticket may not be happy to have their ticket closed (unless
+it's fixed, of course). If you're not certain about closing a ticket, just
+leave a comment with your thoughts instead.
+
+If you do close a ticket, you should always make sure of the following:
+
+ * Be certain that the issue is resolved.
+
+ * Leave a comment explaining the decision to close the ticket.
+
+ * If there is a way they can improve the ticket to reopen it, let them know.
+
+ * If the ticket is a duplicate, reference the original ticket. Also
+ cross-reference the closed ticket by living a comment in the original one
+ -- this allows to access more related information about the reported bug
+ or requested feature.
+
+ * **Be polite.** No one likes having their ticket closed. It can be
+ frustrating or even discouraging. The best way to avoid turning people
+ off from contributing to Django is to be polite and friendly and to offer
+ suggestions for how they could improve this ticket and other tickets in
+ the future.
+
+A ticket can be resolved in a number of ways:
+
+ * fixed
+ Used by the core developers once a patch has been rolled into
+ Django and the issue is fixed.
+
+ * invalid
+ Used if the ticket is found to be incorrect. This means that the
+ issue in the ticket is actually the result of a user error, or
+ describes a problem with something other than Django, or isn't
+ a bug report or feature request at all (for example, some new users
+ submit support queries as tickets).
+
+ * wontfix
+ Used when a core developer decides that this request is not
+ appropriate for consideration in Django. This is usually chosen after
+ discussion in the `django-developers`_ mailing list. Feel free to
+ start or join in discussions of "wontfix" tickets on the
+ django-developers_ mailing list, but please do not reopen tickets
+ closed as "wontfix" by core developers.
+
+ * duplicate
+ Used when another ticket covers the same issue. By closing duplicate
+ tickets, we keep all the discussion in one place, which helps
+ everyone.
+
+ * worksforme
+ Used when the ticket doesn't contain enough detail to replicate
+ the original bug.
+
+ * needsinfo
+ Used when the ticket does not contain enough information to replicate
+ the reported issue but is potentially still valid. The ticket
+ should be reopened when more information is supplied.
+
+If you believe that the ticket was closed in error -- because you're
+still having the issue, or it's popped up somewhere else, or the triagers have
+made a mistake -- please reopen the ticket and provide further information.
+Again, please do not reopen tickets that have been marked as "wontfix" by core
+developers and bring the issue to django-developers_ instead.
+
+.. _how-can-i-help-with-triaging:
+
+How can I help with triaging?
+-----------------------------
+
+Although the core developers make the big decisions in the ticket triage
+process, there's a lot that general community members can do to help the
+triage process. Really, **ANYONE** can help.
+
+Start by `creating an account on Trac`_. If you have an account but have
+forgotten your password, you can reset it using the `password reset page`_.
+
+Then, you can help out by:
+
+ * Closing "Unreviewed" tickets as "invalid", "worksforme" or "duplicate."
+
+ * Promoting "Unreviewed" tickets to "Design decision needed" if a design
+ decision needs to be made, or "Accepted" in case of obvious bugs or
+ sensible, clearly defined, feature requests.
+
+ * Correcting the "Needs tests", "Needs documentation", or "Has patch"
+ flags for tickets where they are incorrectly set.
+
+ * Setting the "`Easy pickings`_" flag for tickets that are small and
+ relatively straightforward.
+
+ * Checking that old tickets are still valid. If a ticket hasn't seen
+ any activity in a long time, it's possible that the problem has been
+ fixed but the ticket hasn't yet been closed.
+
+ * Contacting the owners of tickets that have been claimed but have not
+ seen any recent activity. If the owner doesn't respond after a week
+ or so, remove the owner's claim on the ticket.
+
+ * Identifying trends and themes in the tickets. If there a lot of bug
+ reports about a particular part of Django, it may indicate we should
+ consider refactoring that part of the code. If a trend is emerging,
+ you should raise it for discussion (referencing the relevant tickets)
+ on `django-developers`_.
+
+ * Set the *type* of tickets that are still uncategorized.
+
+ * Verify if patches submitted by other users are correct. If they do and
+ also contain appropriate documentation and tests then move them to the
+ "Ready for Checkin" stage. If they don't then leave a comment to explain
+ why and set the corresponding flags ("Patch needs improvement",
+ "Needs tests" etc.).
+
+.. note::
+
+ The `Reports page`_ contains links to many useful Trac queries, including
+ several that are useful for triaging tickets and reviewing patches as
+ suggested above.
+
+ You can also find more :doc:`new-contributors`.
+
+ .. _Reports page: http://code.djangoproject.com/wiki/Reports
+
+However, we do ask the following of all general community members working in
+the ticket database:
+
+ * Please **don't** close tickets as "wontfix." The core developers will
+ make the final determination of the fate of a ticket, usually after
+ consultation with the community.
+
+ * Please **don'