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Added some sphinx cross-reference links to the built-in template tags…

… and filters in multiple areas of the documentation. Also fixed a few minor inconsistencies and did a little PEP8 cleanup while I was at it.

git-svn-id: http://code.djangoproject.com/svn/django/trunk@16922 bcc190cf-cafb-0310-a4f2-bffc1f526a37
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@jphalip jphalip authored
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6 docs/howto/custom-template-tags.txt
@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ passed around inside the template code:
Internally, these strings are of type ``EscapeString`` or
``EscapeUnicode``. Generally you don't have to worry about these; they
- exist for the implementation of the ``escape`` filter.
+ exist for the implementation of the :tfilter:`escape` filter.
Template filter code falls into one of two situations:
@@ -501,8 +501,8 @@ safe.
To make sure your template tags are thread safe, you should never store state
information on the node itself. For example, Django provides a builtin
-``cycle`` template tag that cycles among a list of given strings each time it's
-rendered:
+:ttag:`cycle` template tag that cycles among a list of given strings each time
+it's rendered:
.. code-block:: html+django
View
9 docs/howto/deployment/fastcgi.txt
@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ Running a threaded server on a TCP port::
Running a preforked server on a Unix domain socket::
./manage.py runfcgi method=prefork socket=/home/user/mysite.sock pidfile=django.pid
-
+
.. admonition:: Socket security
Django's default umask requires that the webserver and the Django fastcgi
@@ -223,7 +223,8 @@ This is probably the most common case, if you're using Django's admin site:
.. _mod_rewrite: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.0/mod/mod_rewrite.html
Django will automatically use the pre-rewrite version of the URL when
-constructing URLs with the ``{% url %}`` template tag (and similar methods).
+constructing URLs with the :ttag:`{% url %}<url>` template tag (and similar
+methods).
Using mod_fcgid as alternative to mod_fastcgi
----------------------------------------------
@@ -409,8 +410,8 @@ Because many of these fastcgi-based solutions require rewriting the URL at
some point inside the Web server, the path information that Django sees may not
resemble the original URL that was passed in. This is a problem if the Django
application is being served from under a particular prefix and you want your
-URLs from the ``{% url %}`` tag to look like the prefix, rather than the
-rewritten version, which might contain, for example, ``mysite.fcgi``.
+URLs from the :ttag:`{% url %}<url>` tag to look like the prefix, rather than
+the rewritten version, which might contain, for example, ``mysite.fcgi``.
Django makes a good attempt to work out what the real script name prefix
should be. In particular, if the Web server sets the ``SCRIPT_URL`` (specific
View
7 docs/intro/tutorial03.txt
@@ -420,9 +420,10 @@ on the object ``poll``. Failing that, it tries an attribute lookup -- which
works, in this case. If attribute lookup had failed, it would've tried a
list-index lookup.
-Method-calling happens in the ``{% for %}`` loop: ``poll.choice_set.all`` is
-interpreted as the Python code ``poll.choice_set.all()``, which returns an
-iterable of Choice objects and is suitable for use in the ``{% for %}`` tag.
+Method-calling happens in the :ttag:`{% for %}<for>` loop:
+``poll.choice_set.all`` is interpreted as the Python code
+``poll.choice_set.all()``, which returns an iterable of Choice objects and is
+suitable for use in the :ttag:`{% for %}<for>` tag.
See the :doc:`template guide </topics/templates>` for more about templates.
View
12 docs/intro/tutorial04.txt
@@ -49,13 +49,13 @@ A quick rundown:
data), we need to worry about Cross Site Request Forgeries.
Thankfully, you don't have to worry too hard, because Django comes with
a very easy-to-use system for protecting against it. In short, all POST
- forms that are targeted at internal URLs should use the ``{% csrf_token %}``
- template tag.
+ forms that are targeted at internal URLs should use the
+ :ttag:`{% csrf_token %}<csrf_token>` template tag.
-The ``{% csrf_token %}`` tag requires information from the request object, which
-is not normally accessible from within the template context. To fix this, a
-small adjustment needs to be made to the ``detail`` view, so that it looks like
-the following::
+The :ttag:`{% csrf_token %}<csrf_token>` tag requires information from the
+request object, which is not normally accessible from within the template
+context. To fix this, a small adjustment needs to be made to the ``detail``
+view, so that it looks like the following::
from django.template import RequestContext
# ...
View
6 docs/ref/contrib/admin/index.txt
@@ -1962,8 +1962,8 @@ if you specifically wanted the admin view from the admin instance named
For more details, see the documentation on :ref:`reversing namespaced URLs
<topics-http-reversing-url-namespaces>`.
-To allow easier reversing of the admin urls in templates, Django provides an
-``admin_url`` filter which takes an action as argument:
+To allow easier reversing of the admin urls in templates, Django provides an
+``admin_urlname`` filter which takes an action as argument:
.. code-block:: html+django
@@ -1974,5 +1974,5 @@ To allow easier reversing of the admin urls in templates, Django provides an
The action in the examples above match the last part of the URL names for
:class:`ModelAdmin` instances described above. The ``opts`` variable can be any
-object which has an ``app_label`` and ``module_name`` and is usually supplied
+object which has an ``app_label`` and ``module_name`` and is usually supplied
by the admin views for the current model.
View
5 docs/ref/templates/api.txt
@@ -493,8 +493,9 @@ django.core.context_processors.csrf
.. versionadded:: 1.2
-This processor adds a token that is needed by the ``csrf_token`` template tag
-for protection against :doc:`Cross Site Request Forgeries </ref/contrib/csrf>`.
+This processor adds a token that is needed by the :ttag:`csrf_token` template
+tag for protection against :doc:`Cross Site Request Forgeries
+</ref/contrib/csrf>`.
django.core.context_processors.request
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
View
183 docs/ref/templates/builtins.txt
@@ -19,18 +19,18 @@ Built-in tag reference
autoescape
^^^^^^^^^^
-Control the current auto-escaping behavior. This tag takes either ``on`` or
+Controls the current auto-escaping behavior. This tag takes either ``on`` or
``off`` as an argument and that determines whether auto-escaping is in effect
inside the block. The block is closed with an ``endautoescape`` ending tag.
When auto-escaping is in effect, all variable content has HTML escaping applied
to it before placing the result into the output (but after any filters have
-been applied). This is equivalent to manually applying the ``escape`` filter
-to each variable.
+been applied). This is equivalent to manually applying the :tfilter:`escape`
+filter to each variable.
The only exceptions are variables that are already marked as "safe" from
escaping, either by the code that populated the variable, or because it has had
-the ``safe`` or ``escape`` filters applied.
+the :tfilter:`safe` or :tfilter:`escape` filters applied.
Sample usage::
@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ Sample usage::
block
^^^^^
-Define a block that can be overridden by child templates. See
+Defines a block that can be overridden by child templates. See
:ref:`Template inheritance <template-inheritance>` for more information.
.. templatetag:: comment
@@ -51,16 +51,16 @@ Define a block that can be overridden by child templates. See
comment
^^^^^^^
-Ignore everything between ``{% comment %}`` and ``{% endcomment %}``
+Ignores everything between ``{% comment %}`` and ``{% endcomment %}``
.. templatetag:: csrf_token
csrf_token
^^^^^^^^^^
-In the Django 1.1.X series, this is a no-op tag that returns an empty string for
-future compatibility purposes. In Django 1.2 and later, it is used for CSRF
-protection, as described in the documentation for :doc:`Cross Site Request
+In the Django 1.1.X series, this is a no-op tag that returns an empty string
+for future compatibility purposes. In Django 1.2 and later, it is used for
+CSRF protection, as described in the documentation for :doc:`Cross Site Request
Forgeries </ref/contrib/csrf>`.
.. templatetag:: cycle
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@ Forgeries </ref/contrib/csrf>`.
cycle
^^^^^
-Cycle among the given strings or variables each time this tag is encountered.
+Cycles among the given strings or variables each time this tag is encountered.
Within a loop, cycles among the given strings each time through the
loop::
@@ -189,15 +189,15 @@ call to ``{% cycle %}`` doesn't specify silent::
debug
^^^^^
-Output a whole load of debugging information, including the current context and
-imported modules.
+Outputs a whole load of debugging information, including the current context
+and imported modules.
.. templatetag:: extends
extends
^^^^^^^
-Signal that this template extends a parent template.
+Signals that this template extends a parent template.
This tag can be used in two ways:
@@ -216,7 +216,7 @@ See :ref:`template-inheritance` for more information.
filter
^^^^^^
-Filter the contents of the variable through variable filters.
+Filters the contents of the variable through variable filters.
Filters can also be piped through each other, and they can have arguments --
just like in variable syntax.
@@ -281,7 +281,8 @@ provided in ``athlete_list``::
{% endfor %}
</ul>
-You can loop over a list in reverse by using ``{% for obj in list reversed %}``.
+You can loop over a list in reverse by using
+``{% for obj in list reversed %}``.
If you need to loop over a list of lists, you can unpack the values
in each sub-list into individual variables. For example, if your context
@@ -302,9 +303,9 @@ would display the keys and values of the dictionary::
The for loop sets a number of variables available within the loop:
- ========================== ================================================
+ ========================== ===============================================
Variable Description
- ========================== ================================================
+ ========================== ===============================================
``forloop.counter`` The current iteration of the loop (1-indexed)
``forloop.counter0`` The current iteration of the loop (0-indexed)
``forloop.revcounter`` The number of iterations from the end of the
@@ -315,7 +316,7 @@ The for loop sets a number of variables available within the loop:
``forloop.last`` True if this is the last time through the loop
``forloop.parentloop`` For nested loops, this is the loop "above" the
current one
- ========================== ================================================
+ ========================== ===============================================
for ... empty
^^^^^^^^^^^^^
@@ -368,8 +369,8 @@ will be displayed if the test fails.
Boolean operators
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
-``if`` tags may use ``and``, ``or`` or ``not`` to test a number of variables or
-to negate a given variable::
+:ttag:`if` tags may use ``and``, ``or`` or ``not`` to test a number of
+variables or to negate a given variable::
{% if athlete_list and coach_list %}
Both athletes and coaches are available.
@@ -406,13 +407,13 @@ will be interpreted like:
if (athlete_list and coach_list) or cheerleader_list
-Use of actual brackets in the ``if`` tag is invalid syntax. If you need them to
-indicate precedence, you should use nested ``if`` tags.
+Use of actual brackets in the :ttag:`if` tag is invalid syntax. If you need
+them to indicate precedence, you should use nested :ttag:`if` tags.
.. versionadded:: 1.2
-``if`` tags may also use the operators ``==``, ``!=``, ``<``, ``>``,
+:ttag:`if` tags may also use the operators ``==``, ``!=``, ``<``, ``>``,
``<=``, ``>=`` and ``in`` which work as follows:
@@ -475,8 +476,8 @@ Greater than or equal to. Example::
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Contained within. This operator is supported by many Python containers to test
-whether the given value is in the container. The following are some examples of
-how ``x in y`` will be interpreted::
+whether the given value is in the container. The following are some examples
+of how ``x in y`` will be interpreted::
{% if "bc" in "abcdef" %}
This appears since "bc" is a substring of "abcdef"
@@ -511,7 +512,7 @@ you should use::
Filters
^^^^^^^
-You can also use filters in the ``if`` expression. For example::
+You can also use filters in the :ttag:`if` expression. For example::
{% if messages|length >= 100 %}
You have lots of messages today!
@@ -531,7 +532,8 @@ operators, from lowest to highest, is as follows:
* ``in``
* ``==``, ``!=``, ``<``, ``>``, ``<=``, ``>=``
-(This follows Python exactly). So, for example, the following complex if tag:
+(This follows Python exactly). So, for example, the following complex
+:ttag:`if` tag:
.. code-block:: django
@@ -543,9 +545,9 @@ operators, from lowest to highest, is as follows:
(a == b) or ((c == d) and e)
-If you need different precedence, you will need to use nested if tags. Sometimes
-that is better for clarity anyway, for the sake of those who do not know the
-precedence rules.
+If you need different precedence, you will need to use nested :ttag:`if` tags.
+Sometimes that is better for clarity anyway, for the sake of those who do not
+know the precedence rules.
.. templatetag:: ifchanged
@@ -606,7 +608,7 @@ Example::
...
{% endifequal %}
-As in the ``{% if %}`` tag, an ``{% else %}`` clause is optional.
+As in the :ttag:`if` tag, an ``{% else %}`` clause is optional.
The arguments can be hard-coded strings, so the following is valid::
@@ -616,21 +618,24 @@ The arguments can be hard-coded strings, so the following is valid::
It is only possible to compare an argument to template variables or strings.
You cannot check for equality with Python objects such as ``True`` or
-``False``. If you need to test if something is true or false, use the ``if``
-tag instead.
+``False``. If you need to test if something is true or false, use the
+:ttag:`if` tag instead.
.. versionadded:: 1.2
- An alternative to the ``ifequal`` tag is to use the :ttag:`if` tag and the ``==`` operator.
+ An alternative to the ``ifequal`` tag is to use the :ttag:`if` tag and the
+ ``==`` operator.
.. templatetag:: ifnotequal
ifnotequal
^^^^^^^^^^
-Just like ``ifequal``, except it tests that the two arguments are not equal.
+Just like :ttag:`ifequal`, except it tests that the two arguments are not
+equal.
.. versionadded:: 1.2
- An alternative to the ``ifnotequal`` tag is to use the :ttag:`if` tag and the ``!=`` operator.
+ An alternative to the ``ifnotequal`` tag is to use the :ttag:`if` tag and
+ the ``!=`` operator.
.. templatetag:: include
@@ -683,14 +688,14 @@ no variables at all), use the ``only`` option::
This means that there is no shared state between included templates --
each include is a completely independent rendering process.
-See also: ``{% ssi %}``.
+See also: :ttag:`{% ssi %}<ssi>`.
.. templatetag:: load
load
^^^^
-Load a custom template tag set.
+Loads a custom template tag set.
For example, the following template would load all the tags and filters
registered in ``somelibrary`` and ``otherlibrary``::
@@ -713,7 +718,7 @@ more information.
now
^^^
-Display the current date and/or time, using a format according to the given
+Displays the current date and/or time, using a format according to the given
string. Such string can contain format specifiers characters as described
in the :tfilter:`date` filter section.
@@ -747,7 +752,7 @@ This would display as "It is the 4th of September".
regroup
^^^^^^^
-Regroup a list of alike objects by a common attribute.
+Regroups a list of alike objects by a common attribute.
This complex tag is best illustrated by use of an example: say that ``people``
is a list of people represented by dictionaries with ``first_name``,
@@ -807,10 +812,10 @@ attribute and calling the result ``gender_list``.
Note that ``{% regroup %}`` does not order its input! Our example relies on
the fact that the ``people`` list was ordered by ``gender`` in the first place.
-If the ``people`` list did *not* order its members by ``gender``, the regrouping
-would naively display more than one group for a single gender. For example,
-say the ``people`` list was set to this (note that the males are not grouped
-together):
+If the ``people`` list did *not* order its members by ``gender``, the
+regrouping would naively display more than one group for a single gender. For
+example, say the ``people`` list was set to this (note that the males are not
+grouped together):
.. code-block:: python
@@ -839,8 +844,8 @@ above would result in the following output:
The easiest solution to this gotcha is to make sure in your view code that the
data is ordered according to how you want to display it.
-Another solution is to sort the data in the template using the ``dictsort``
-filter, if your data is in a list of dictionaries::
+Another solution is to sort the data in the template using the
+:tfilter:`dictsort` filter, if your data is in a list of dictionaries::
{% regroup people|dictsort:"gender" by gender as gender_list %}
@@ -899,11 +904,11 @@ this example, the space around ``Hello`` won't be stripped::
ssi
^^^
-Output the contents of a given file into the page.
+Outputs the contents of a given file into the page.
-Like a simple "include" tag, ``{% ssi %}`` includes the contents of another
-file -- which must be specified using an absolute path -- in the current
-page::
+Like a simple :ttag:`include` tag, ``{% ssi %}`` includes the contents of
+another file -- which must be specified using an absolute path -- in the
+current page::
{% ssi /home/html/ljworld.com/includes/right_generic.html %}
@@ -913,9 +918,10 @@ file are evaluated as template code, within the current context::
{% ssi /home/html/ljworld.com/includes/right_generic.html parsed %}
Note that if you use ``{% ssi %}``, you'll need to define
-:setting:`ALLOWED_INCLUDE_ROOTS` in your Django settings, as a security measure.
+:setting:`ALLOWED_INCLUDE_ROOTS` in your Django settings, as a security
+measure.
-See also: ``{% include %}``.
+See also: :ttag:`{% include %}<include>`.
.. admonition:: Forwards compatibility
@@ -946,7 +952,7 @@ See also: ``{% include %}``.
templatetag
^^^^^^^^^^^
-Output one of the syntax characters used to compose template tags.
+Outputs one of the syntax characters used to compose template tags.
Since the template system has no concept of "escaping", to display one of the
bits used in template tags, you must use the ``{% templatetag %}`` tag.
@@ -1100,8 +1106,8 @@ projects?
widthratio
^^^^^^^^^^
-For creating bar charts and such, this tag calculates the ratio of a given value
-to a maximum value, and then applies that ratio to a constant.
+For creating bar charts and such, this tag calculates the ratio of a given
+value to a maximum value, and then applies that ratio to a constant.
For example::
@@ -1189,7 +1195,8 @@ For example::
{{ value|addslashes }}
-If ``value`` is ``"I'm using Django"``, the output will be ``"I\'m using Django"``.
+If ``value`` is ``"I'm using Django"``, the output will be
+``"I\'m using Django"``.
.. templatefilter:: capfirst
@@ -1228,7 +1235,8 @@ For example::
{{ value|cut:" "}}
-If ``value`` is ``"String with spaces"``, the output will be ``"Stringwithspaces"``.
+If ``value`` is ``"String with spaces"``, the output will be
+``"Stringwithspaces"``.
.. templatefilter:: date
@@ -1353,7 +1361,8 @@ used, without applying any localization.
default
^^^^^^^
-If value evaluates to ``False``, use given default. Otherwise, use the value.
+If value evaluates to ``False``, uses the given default. Otherwise, uses the
+value.
For example::
@@ -1366,11 +1375,11 @@ If ``value`` is ``""`` (the empty string), the output will be ``nothing``.
default_if_none
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
-If (and only if) value is ``None``, use given default. Otherwise, use the
+If (and only if) value is ``None``, uses the given default. Otherwise, uses the
value.
Note that if an empty string is given, the default value will *not* be used.
-Use the ``default`` filter if you want to fallback for empty strings.
+Use the :tfilter:`default` filter if you want to fallback for empty strings.
For example::
@@ -1448,12 +1457,12 @@ Escapes a string's HTML. Specifically, it makes these replacements:
The escaping is only applied when the string is output, so it does not matter
where in a chained sequence of filters you put ``escape``: it will always be
applied as though it were the last filter. If you want escaping to be applied
-immediately, use the ``force_escape`` filter.
+immediately, use the :tfilter:`force_escape` filter.
Applying ``escape`` to a variable that would normally have auto-escaping
applied to the result will only result in one round of escaping being done. So
it is safe to use this function even in auto-escaping environments. If you want
-multiple escaping passes to be applied, use the ``force_escape`` filter.
+multiple escaping passes to be applied, use the :tfilter:`force_escape` filter.
.. templatefilter:: escapejs
@@ -1476,7 +1485,7 @@ the output will be ``"testing\\u000D\\u000Ajavascript \\u0027string\\u0022 \\u00
filesizeformat
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
-Format the value like a 'human-readable' file size (i.e. ``'13 KB'``,
+Formats the value like a 'human-readable' file size (i.e. ``'13 KB'``,
``'4.1 MB'``, ``'102 bytes'``, etc).
For example::
@@ -1505,7 +1514,8 @@ fix_ampersands
.. note::
- This is rarely useful as ampersands are automatically escaped. See escape_ for more information.
+ This is rarely useful as ampersands are automatically escaped. See
+ :tfilter:`escape` for more information.
Replaces ampersands with ``&amp;`` entities.
@@ -1570,11 +1580,11 @@ with an argument of ``-1``.
force_escape
^^^^^^^^^^^^
-Applies HTML escaping to a string (see the ``escape`` filter for details).
-This filter is applied *immediately* and returns a new, escaped string. This
-is useful in the rare cases where you need multiple escaping or want to apply
-other filters to the escaped results. Normally, you want to use the ``escape``
-filter.
+Applies HTML escaping to a string (see the :tfilter:`escape` filter for
+details). This filter is applied *immediately* and returns a new, escaped
+string. This is useful in the rare cases where you need multiple escaping or
+want to apply other filters to the escaped results. Normally, you want to use
+the :tfilter:`escape` filter.
.. templatefilter:: get_digit
@@ -1602,7 +1612,7 @@ suitable for including in a URL. This is necessary if you're trying to use
strings containing non-ASCII characters in a URL.
It's safe to use this filter on a string that has already gone through the
-``urlencode`` filter.
+:tfilter:`urlencode` filter.
For example::
@@ -1635,8 +1645,8 @@ For example::
{{ value|last }}
-If ``value`` is the list ``['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']``, the output will be the string
-``"d"``.
+If ``value`` is the list ``['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']``, the output will be the
+string ``"d"``.
.. templatefilter:: length
@@ -1744,7 +1754,8 @@ For example::
{{ value|lower }}
-If ``value`` is ``Still MAD At Yoko``, the output will be ``still mad at yoko``.
+If ``value`` is ``Still MAD At Yoko``, the output will be
+``still mad at yoko``.
.. templatefilter:: make_list
@@ -1785,7 +1796,8 @@ If ``value`` is ``800-COLLECT``, the output will be ``800-2655328``.
pluralize
^^^^^^^^^
-Returns a plural suffix if the value is not 1. By default, this suffix is ``'s'``.
+Returns a plural suffix if the value is not 1. By default, this suffix is
+``'s'``.
Example::
@@ -2093,12 +2105,12 @@ Newlines within the string will be removed.
truncatewords_html
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
-Similar to ``truncatewords``, except that it is aware of HTML tags. Any tags
-that are opened in the string and not closed before the truncation point, are
-closed immediately after the truncation.
+Similar to :tfilter:`truncatewords`, except that it is aware of HTML tags. Any
+tags that are opened in the string and not closed before the truncation point,
+are closed immediately after the truncation.
-This is less efficient than ``truncatewords``, so should only be used when it
-is being passed HTML text.
+This is less efficient than :tfilter:`truncatewords`, so should only be used
+when it is being passed HTML text.
For example::
@@ -2117,8 +2129,8 @@ unordered_list
Recursively takes a self-nested list and returns an HTML unordered list --
WITHOUT opening and closing <ul> tags.
-The list is assumed to be in the proper format. For example, if ``var`` contains
-``['States', ['Kansas', ['Lawrence', 'Topeka'], 'Illinois']]``, then
+The list is assumed to be in the proper format. For example, if ``var``
+contains ``['States', ['Kansas', ['Lawrence', 'Topeka'], 'Illinois']]``, then
``{{ var|unordered_list }}`` would return::
<li>States
@@ -2295,7 +2307,7 @@ Other tags and filter libraries
Django comes with a couple of other template-tag libraries that you have to
enable explicitly in your :setting:`INSTALLED_APPS` setting and enable in your
-template with the ``{% load %}`` tag.
+template with the :ttag:`{% load %}<load>` tag.
django.contrib.humanize
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
@@ -2335,9 +2347,10 @@ l10n
^^^^
Provides a couple of templatetags that allow control over the localization of
-values in Django templates. It is slightly different from the libraries described
-above because you don't need to add any application to the :setting:`INSTALLED_APPS`;
-you only need to load the library using ``{% load l10n %}``.
+values in Django templates. It is slightly different from the libraries
+described above because you don't need to add any application to the
+:setting:`INSTALLED_APPS`; you only need to load the library using
+``{% load l10n %}``.
See :ref:`topic-l10n-templates`.
View
2  docs/topics/cache.txt
@@ -587,6 +587,8 @@ Here's the same thing, with ``my_view`` wrapped in ``cache_page``::
(r'^foo/(\d{1,2})/$', cache_page(60 * 15)(my_view)),
)
+.. templatetag:: cache
+
Template fragment caching
=========================
View
8 docs/topics/db/optimization.txt
@@ -225,8 +225,8 @@ It is optimal because:
1. Since QuerySets are lazy, this does no database queries if 'display_inbox'
is False.
- #. Use of ``with`` means that we store ``user.emails.all`` in a variable for
- later use, allowing its cache to be re-used.
+ #. Use of :ttag:`with` means that we store ``user.emails.all`` in a variable
+ for later use, allowing its cache to be re-used.
#. The line ``{% if emails %}`` causes ``QuerySet.__nonzero__()`` to be called,
which causes the ``user.emails.all()`` query to be run on the database, and
@@ -236,10 +236,10 @@ It is optimal because:
#. The use of ``{{ emails|length }}`` calls ``QuerySet.__len__()``, filling
out the rest of the cache without doing another query.
- #. The ``for`` loop iterates over the already filled cache.
+ #. The :ttag:`for` loop iterates over the already filled cache.
In total, this code does either one or zero database queries. The only
-deliberate optimization performed is the use of the ``with`` tag. Using
+deliberate optimization performed is the use of the :ttag:`with` tag. Using
``QuerySet.exists()`` or ``QuerySet.count()`` at any point would cause
additional queries.
View
4 docs/topics/i18n/internationalization.txt
@@ -425,6 +425,8 @@ Translations in :doc:`Django templates </topics/templates>` uses two template
tags and a slightly different syntax than in Python code. To give your template
access to these tags, put ``{% load i18n %}`` toward the top of your template.
+.. templatetag:: trans
+
``trans`` template tag
----------------------
@@ -485,7 +487,7 @@ or should be used as arguments for other template tags or filters::
.. versionchanged:: 1.3
New keyword argument format.
-Contrarily to the ``trans`` tag, the ``blocktrans`` tag allows you to mark
+Contrarily to the :ttag:`trans` tag, the ``blocktrans`` tag allows you to mark
complex sentences consisting of literals and variable content for translation
by making use of placeholders::
View
59 docs/topics/templates.txt
@@ -110,8 +110,8 @@ Filters
You can modify variables for display by using **filters**.
Filters look like this: ``{{ name|lower }}``. This displays the value of the
-``{{ name }}`` variable after being filtered through the ``lower`` filter,
-which converts text to lowercase. Use a pipe (``|``) to apply a filter.
+``{{ name }}`` variable after being filtered through the :tfilter:`lower`
+filter, which converts text to lowercase. Use a pipe (``|``) to apply a filter.
Filters can be "chained." The output of one filter is applied to the next.
``{{ text|escape|linebreaks }}`` is a common idiom for escaping text contents,
@@ -121,13 +121,13 @@ Some filters take arguments. A filter argument looks like this: ``{{
bio|truncatewords:30 }}``. This will display the first 30 words of the ``bio``
variable.
-Filter arguments that contain spaces must be quoted; for example, to join a list
-with commas and spaced you'd use ``{{ list|join:", " }}``.
+Filter arguments that contain spaces must be quoted; for example, to join a
+list with commas and spaced you'd use ``{{ list|join:", " }}``.
Django provides about thirty built-in template filters. You can read all about
them in the :ref:`built-in filter reference <ref-templates-builtins-filters>`.
-To give you a taste of what's available, here are some of the more commonly used
-template filters:
+To give you a taste of what's available, here are some of the more commonly
+used template filters:
:tfilter:`default`
If a variable is false or empty, use given default. Otherwise, use the
@@ -206,7 +206,7 @@ tags:
In the above, if ``athlete_list`` is not empty, the number of athletes
will be displayed by the ``{{ athlete_list|length }}`` variable.
- You can also use filters and various operators in the ``if`` tag::
+ You can also use filters and various operators in the :ttag:`if` tag::
{% if athlete_list|length > 1 %}
Team: {% for athlete in athlete_list %} ... {% endfor %}
@@ -286,8 +286,8 @@ This template, which we'll call ``base.html``, defines a simple HTML skeleton
document that you might use for a simple two-column page. It's the job of
"child" templates to fill the empty blocks with content.
-In this example, the ``{% block %}`` tag defines three blocks that child
-templates can fill in. All the ``block`` tag does is to tell the template
+In this example, the :ttag:`block` tag defines three blocks that child
+templates can fill in. All the :ttag:`block` tag does is to tell the template
engine that a child template may override those portions of the template.
A child template might look like this::
@@ -303,11 +303,11 @@ A child template might look like this::
{% endfor %}
{% endblock %}
-The ``{% extends %}`` tag is the key here. It tells the template engine that
+The :ttag:`extends` tag is the key here. It tells the template engine that
this template "extends" another template. When the template system evaluates
this template, first it locates the parent -- in this case, "base.html".
-At that point, the template engine will notice the three ``{% block %}`` tags
+At that point, the template engine will notice the three :ttag:`block` tags
in ``base.html`` and replace those blocks with the contents of the child
template. Depending on the value of ``blog_entries``, the output might look
like::
@@ -359,10 +359,10 @@ content areas, such as section-wide navigation.
Here are some tips for working with inheritance:
- * If you use ``{% extends %}`` in a template, it must be the first template
+ * If you use :ttag:`{% extends %}<extends>` in a template, it must be the first template
tag in that template. Template inheritance won't work, otherwise.
- * More ``{% block %}`` tags in your base templates are better. Remember,
+ * More :ttag:`{% block %}<block>` tags in your base templates are better. Remember,
child templates don't have to define all parent blocks, so you can fill
in reasonable defaults in a number of blocks, then only define the ones
you need later. It's better to have more hooks than fewer hooks.
@@ -388,11 +388,11 @@ Here are some tips for working with inheritance:
In larger templates, this technique helps you see which ``{% block %}``
tags are being closed.
-Finally, note that you can't define multiple ``{% block %}`` tags with the same
+Finally, note that you can't define multiple :ttag:`block` tags with the same
name in the same template. This limitation exists because a block tag works in
"both" directions. That is, a block tag doesn't just provide a hole to fill --
it also defines the content that fills the hole in the *parent*. If there were
-two similarly-named ``{% block %}`` tags in a template, that template's parent
+two similarly-named :ttag:`block` tags in a template, that template's parent
wouldn't know which one of the blocks' content to use.
.. _next section: #automatic-html-escaping
@@ -436,8 +436,8 @@ do potentially bad things. This type of security exploit is called a
To avoid this problem, you have two options:
* One, you can make sure to run each untrusted variable through the
- ``escape`` filter (documented below), which converts potentially harmful
- HTML characters to unharmful ones. This was the default solution
+ :tfilter:`escape` filter (documented below), which converts potentially
+ harmful HTML characters to unharmful ones. This was the default solution
in Django for its first few years, but the problem is that it puts the
onus on *you*, the developer / template author, to ensure you're escaping
everything. It's easy to forget to escape data.
@@ -476,7 +476,8 @@ you might be using Django's template system to produce text that is *not* HTML
For individual variables
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-To disable auto-escaping for an individual variable, use the ``safe`` filter::
+To disable auto-escaping for an individual variable, use the :tfilter:`safe`
+filter::
This will be escaped: {{ data }}
This will not be escaped: {{ data|safe }}
@@ -492,13 +493,13 @@ For template blocks
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To control auto-escaping for a template, wrap the template (or just a
-particular section of the template) in the ``autoescape`` tag, like so::
+particular section of the template) in the :ttag:`autoescape` tag, like so::
{% autoescape off %}
Hello {{ name }}
{% endautoescape %}
-The ``autoescape`` tag takes either ``on`` or ``off`` as its argument. At
+The :ttag:`autoescape` tag takes either ``on`` or ``off`` as its argument. At
times, you might want to force auto-escaping when it would otherwise be
disabled. Here is an example template::
@@ -514,8 +515,8 @@ disabled. Here is an example template::
{% endautoescape %}
The auto-escaping tag passes its effect onto templates that extend the
-current one as well as templates included via the ``include`` tag, just like
-all block tags. For example::
+current one as well as templates included via the :ttag:`include` tag,
+just like all block tags. For example::
# base.html
@@ -548,10 +549,10 @@ think about the cases in which data shouldn't be escaped, and mark data
appropriately, so things Just Work in the template.
If you're creating a template that might be used in situations where you're
-not sure whether auto-escaping is enabled, then add an ``escape`` filter to any
-variable that needs escaping. When auto-escaping is on, there's no danger of
-the ``escape`` filter *double-escaping* data -- the ``escape`` filter does not
-affect auto-escaped variables.
+not sure whether auto-escaping is enabled, then add an :tfilter:`escape` filter
+to any variable that needs escaping. When auto-escaping is on, there's no
+danger of the :tfilter:`escape` filter *double-escaping* data -- the
+:tfilter:`escape` filter does not affect auto-escaped variables.
String literals and automatic escaping
--------------------------------------
@@ -561,9 +562,9 @@ As we mentioned earlier, filter arguments can be strings::
{{ data|default:"This is a string literal." }}
All string literals are inserted **without** any automatic escaping into the
-template -- they act as if they were all passed through the ``safe`` filter.
-The reasoning behind this is that the template author is in control of what
-goes into the string literal, so they can make sure the text is correctly
+template -- they act as if they were all passed through the :tfilter:`safe`
+filter. The reasoning behind this is that the template author is in control of
+what goes into the string literal, so they can make sure the text is correctly
escaped when the template is written.
This means you would write ::
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