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Fixed #11831 -- Corrected typo in comments docs. Thanks to gsf for th…

…e patch.

git-svn-id: http://code.djangoproject.com/svn/django/trunk@11533 bcc190cf-cafb-0310-a4f2-bffc1f526a37
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commit fc7ef1c86c0b7345892f59f582fa268a66a24d62 1 parent 1ed9d29
@freakboy3742 freakboy3742 authored
Showing with 25 additions and 25 deletions.
  1. +25 −25 docs/ref/contrib/comments/index.txt
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50 docs/ref/contrib/comments/index.txt
@@ -24,13 +24,13 @@ Quick start guide
To get started using the ``comments`` app, follow these steps:
- #. Install the comments framework by adding ``'django.contrib.comments'`` to
+ #. Install the comments framework by adding ``'django.contrib.comments'`` to
:setting:`INSTALLED_APPS`.
#. Run ``manage.py syncdb`` so that Django will create the comment tables.
#. Add the comment app's URLs to your project's ``urls.py``:
-
+
.. code-block:: python
urlpatterns = patterns('',
@@ -41,9 +41,9 @@ To get started using the ``comments`` app, follow these steps:
#. Use the `comment template tags`_ below to embed comments in your
templates.
-
+
You might also want to examine :ref:`ref-contrib-comments-settings`.
-
+
Comment template tags
=====================
@@ -67,20 +67,20 @@ different ways you can specify which object to attach to:
#. Refer to the object directly -- the more common method. Most of the
time, you'll have some object in the template's context you want
to attach the comment to; you can simply use that object.
-
- For example, in a blog entry page that has a variable named ``entry``,
+
+ For example, in a blog entry page that has a variable named ``entry``,
you could use the following to load the number of comments::
-
+
{% get_comment_count for entry as comment_count %}.
-
+
#. Refer to the object by content-type and object id. You'd use this method
if you, for some reason, don't actually have direct access to the object.
-
+
Following the above example, if you knew the object ID was ``14`` but
didn't have access to the actual object, you could do something like::
-
+
{% get_comment_count for blog.entry 14 as comment_count %}
-
+
In the above, ``blog.entry`` is the app label and (lower-cased) model
name of the model class.
@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ different ways you can specify which object to attach to:
Displaying comments
-------------------
-To get a the list of comments for some object, use :ttag:`get_comment_list`::
+To get the list of comments for some object, use :ttag:`get_comment_list`::
{% get_comment_list for [object] as [varname] %}
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ For example::
{% for comment in comment_list %}
...
{% endfor %}
-
+
This returns a list of :class:`~django.contrib.comments.models.Comment` objects;
see :ref:`the comment model documentation <ref-contrib-comments-models>` for
details.
@@ -116,9 +116,9 @@ To count comments attached to an object, use :ttag:`get_comment_count`::
For example::
{% get_comment_count for event as comment_count %}
-
+
<p>This event has {{ comment_count }} comments.</p>
-
+
Displaying the comment post form
--------------------------------
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@ If you want more control over the look and feel of the comment form, you use use
you can use in the template::
{% get_comment_form for [object] as [varname] %}
-
+
A complete form might look like::
{% get_comment_form for event as form %}
@@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ A complete form might look like::
<td><input type="submit" name="preview" class="submit-post" value="Preview"></td>
</tr>
</form>
-
+
Be sure to read the `notes on the comment form`_, below, for some special
considerations you'll need to make if you're using this approach.
@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ Redirecting after the comment post
To specify the URL you want to redirect to after the comment has been posted,
you can include a hidden form input called ``next`` in your comment form. For example::
-
+
<input type="hidden" name="next" value="{% url my_comment_was_posted %}" />
.. _notes-on-the-comment-form:
@@ -198,24 +198,24 @@ should know about:
* It contains a number of hidden fields that contain timestamps, information
about the object the comment should be attached to, and a "security hash"
- used to validate this information. If someone tampers with this data --
+ used to validate this information. If someone tampers with this data --
something comment spammers will try -- the comment submission will fail.
-
+
If you're rendering a custom comment form, you'll need to make sure to
pass these values through unchanged.
-
+
* The timestamp is used to ensure that "reply attacks" can't continue very
long. Users who wait too long between requesting the form and posting a
comment will have their submissions refused.
-
+
* The comment form includes a "honeypot_" field. It's a trap: if any data is
entered in that field, the comment will be considered spam (spammers often
automatically fill in all fields in an attempt to make valid submissions).
-
+
The default form hides this field with a piece of CSS and further labels
it with a warning field; if you use the comment form with a custom
template you should be sure to do the same.
-
+
.. _honeypot: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honeypot_(computing)
More information
@@ -230,4 +230,4 @@ More information
upgrade
custom
forms
- moderation
+ moderation
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