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README.md

Qoopido.js

Qoopido.js is a concept for a modularly built and loadable JavaScript library. Due to its flexible structure and the extension/interitance pattern it is based on it is easily extendable. So it is both, a library of existing modules as well as an extendable base for your very own modules. Every module included supports being loaded via require.js as an AMD module or manually including it (and its dependencies) via script tags.

Compatibility

Qoopido.js is not meant to support older legacy Internet Explorers but should run (with limitations regarding some of the modules) from IE8 onwards. I test on Chrome, Firefox, Safari for OSX, Safari for iOS and Android as well as IE8, IE9, IE10 and IE11.

External dependencies

The library itself does not depend on jQuery but some modules (everything within the jquery folder) are either jQuery specific or provide an abstraction for Qoopido.js modules to function as jQuery plugins.

Installation

There currently are three ways to get Qoopido.js included into your project:

Manual

Download the current version from the following URL and put all the contents of the directory dist/latest/src and/or dist/latest/min into a directory under your project root.

https://github.com/dlueth/qoopido.js

GitHub

Clone the following repository into your projects directory structure.

git clone https://github.com/dlueth/qoopido.js.git

Bower

Change into your project directory and type

bower install qoopido.js

If you have Node, NPM and bower installed typing bower install will install eventually required external dependencies into the location you specified in the .bowerrc file in your users home directory.

Using the library

Although the library is technically capable of being manually included the prefered way definately is to load it via an AMD loader like require.js. After downloading and placing it in a sane place put the following code snippet into your HTML code to get require.js up & running:

<script type="text/javascript" data-main="./app/main" src="./vendor/require.js/require.min.js"></script>

Next create the file ./app/main.js (from the data-main attribute above), copy & paste the following code snippet and adjust paths and dependencies according to your specific needs and habits:

require.config({
	baseUrl: 'app/',
	paths: {
		qoopido: '../vendor/qoopido.js/dist/latest/min'
	}
});

require([ 'qoopido/base' ], function() {
	'use strict';

	require([ 'qoopido/worker' ], function(mWorker) {
		// put your code here, e.g.
		var worker = mWorker.create();

		worker.execute(function() {
				var result;
				// do something time-consuming here

				return result;
			})
			.then(
				function(result) {
					// success
				},
				function() {
					// error
				}
			);
	});
});

This code will set some basic configuration for require.js, load Qoopido.js base module which is required for the worker module that finally gets invoked and processes a time-consuming task in the background without blocking the browsers UI.

Extending the library

Put the following code snippet into your HTML code to get require.js up & running - remember to adjust any paths accordingly:

<script type="text/javascript" data-main="./app/main" src="./vendor/require.js/require.min.js"></script>

Like in the example above create the file ./app/main.js and copy & paste the following code:

require.config({
	baseUrl: 'app/',
	paths: {
		qoopido: '../vendor/qoopido.js/dist/latest/min'
	}
});

require([ 'qoopido/base' ], function() {
	'use strict';

	require('mymodule', function(mymodule) {
		// put your code here, e.g.
		var instance = mymodule.create();
	});
});

This code will set some basic configuration for require.js, load Qoopido.js base module which is required for your custom module to be loaded and processed afterwards.

Next create your module file app/mymodule.js and add the code below:

;(function(definition, global) {
	global.qoopido.register('mymodule', definition, [ 'qoopido/emitter' ]);
}(function(modules, shared, global, undefined) {
	'use strict';

	// add private, static(!) properties and variables here
	// add private, static(!) methods here
	// add private methods here (use call/apply for invocation)

	var prototype = modules['emitter'].extend({
		// add pulic properties here
		_constructor: function() {
			var self = this;

			// optionally call parent constructor
			prototype._parent._constructor.call(self);
		},
		// add public methods here
		publicMethod: function() {
			console.log('public method called');

			return true;
		}
	});

	return prototype;
}, this));

You just developed your first custom module with only one public method, publicMethod. By defining qoopido/emitter as a dependency and extending modules['emitter'] your custom module also inherited all of its original methods.

So let us see what happens when you actually call your public method (console openened) by changing your ./app/main.js to:

require.config({
	baseUrl: 'app/',
	paths: {
		qoopido: '../vendor/qoopido.js/dist/latest/min'
	}
});

require([ 'qoopido/base' ], function() {
	'use strict';

	require('mymodule', function(mymodule) {
		var instance = mymodule.create();

		instance.publicMethod();
	});
});

OK, so far so good: The module just output the string public method called to your console, correct? Anything more to it, you ask? Sure! Alter your ./app/main.js again to contain the following code:

require.config({
	baseUrl: 'app/',
	paths: {
		qoopido: '../vendor/qoopido.js/dist/latest/min'
	}
});

require([ 'qoopido/base' ], function() {
	'use strict';

	require('mymodule', function(mymodule) {
		var instance = mymodule.create()
        		.on('prePublicMethod', function(event, originalArguments) {
        			console.log(arguments);
        		})
        		.on('postPublicMethod', function(event, originalArguments, result) {
        			console.log(arguments);
        		});

		instance.publicMethod('argument 1', 'argument 2');
	});
});

If you run this it should output something like

["prePublicMethod", Array[2]]
public method called
["postPublicMethod", Array[2], true]

to your console. But what exactly happened?

Remember that your module extends emitter which provides facilities to emit events and register to them. The emitter module has its own _constructor which, if invoked like you did, maps all the original methods of the extending module to emit pre and post events automatically. Private methods (prefixed with an underscore), methods of the emitter or base modules itself as well as any method prefixed with the word get will not get mapped.

What we did here was to register listeners to these automatically emitted events. You can easily emit your own custom events by changing your app/mymodule.js to something like:

;(function(definition, global) {
	global.qoopido.register('mymodule', definition, [ 'qoopido/emitter' ]);
}(function(modules, shared, global, undefined) {
	'use strict';

	var prototype = modules['emitter'].extend({
		_constructor: function() {
			var self = this;

			prototype._parent._constructor.call(self);
		},
		_privateMethod: function() {
			this.emit('privateMethod', 'argument 1', 'argument 2');
		},
		publicMethod: function() {
			this._privateMethod();
		}
	});

	return prototype;
}, this));

And afterwards register listeners in your ./app/main.js like in the following example:

require.config({
	baseUrl: 'app/',
	paths: {
		qoopido: '../vendor/qoopido.js/dist/latest/min'
	}
});

require([ 'qoopido/base' ], function() {
	'use strict';

	require('mymodule', function(mymodule) {
		var instance = mymodule.create()
			.on('privateMethod', function() {
				console.log(arguments);
			});

		instance.publicMethod();
	});
});

Although this example does absolutely not present a practical use case nor anything you would come across in real code it should output something like the following to your console:

["privateMethod", "argument 1", "argument 2"]

Included modules

  • asset (XHR asset loading with localStorage caching)
  • base (object inheritance)
  • component
    • iterator (flexible and UI/UX independent iterator for e.g. paging)
    • remux (REM based approach to responsive web design)
    • sense (react to media queries in JavaScript)
  • dom
    • collection (DOM element extension)
    • element (DOM element extension)
      • emerge (react on elements entering or nearing the visible browser area)
      • lazyimage (load images when entering or nearing the visible browser area)
      • shrinkimage (load ".shrunk" files from server, alpha PNGs reduced by 60-80% in filesize)
    • event (DOM event normalization)
  • emitter (event emitter)
  • function (provides single functions, e.g. helper)
    • load
      • css (inject a stylesheet into document)
    • merge (function to deep merge objects)
    • proximity (calculate px distance between two positions)
    • unique (generate unique identifiers)
      • string (generate unique strings, e.g. for callbacks)
      • uuid (generate unique ids)
  • jquery
    • extension
      • selector
    • function
      • prefetch
    • plugin
      • emerge
      • lazyimage
      • shrinkimage
  • particle (still very basic)
  • polyfill
    • array
      • indexof
    • document
      • getelementsbyclassname
      • queryselector
      • queryselectorall
    • element
      • matches/matchesSelector
    • object
      • create
      • defineproperties
      • defineproperty
      • getownpropertydescriptor
      • getownpropertynames
      • getprototypeof
      • keys
    • string
      • lcfirst
      • trim
      • ucfirst
    • window
      • addeventlistener
      • customevent
      • dispatchevent
      • getcomputedstyle
      • matchmedia
      • promise
      • removeeventlistener
  • pool (pooling facilities and pool factory)
    • array (pooling facilities for arrays)
    • dom (pooling facilities for DOM elements)
    • module (pooling facilities for Qoopido.js modules or external objects/classes)
    • object (pooling facilities for objects)
  • promise
    • all
    • defer
    • race
  • proxy (universal proxy method)
  • renderer (centralized rendering pipeline)
  • support (feature detection)
    • capability
      • datauri
      • touch
    • css
      • borderradius
      • boxshadow
      • rem
      • rgba
      • textshadow
      • transform
        • 2d
        • 3d
      • transition
    • element
      • canvas
        • todataurl
          • jpeg
          • png
          • webp
      • svg
      • video
        • mp4
        • ogg
        • webm
  • transport (base class for all transports)
    • jsonp (JSONP transport)
    • xhr (AJAX transport)
  • url (handle URLs, parameter etc.)
  • vector
    • 2d
  • widget
    • image
      • adapt (adaptive & lazy-loadable images embracing microdata)
  • worker (flexible web worker implementation

CodePen demos

Beside the demos within this repositories demo directory I have also done some pens on CodePen that demonstrate combined features:

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