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Remove doc on experimental networking support

Signed-off-by: Aanand Prasad <aanand.prasad@gmail.com>
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aanand committed Jul 25, 2016
1 parent 619bf4c commit 07e2426d89750d8eddabe9537d527ac46197e753
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  1. +2 −180 experimental/compose_swarm_networking.md
@@ -1,183 +1,5 @@
# Experimental: Compose, Swarm and Multi-Host Networking
-The [experimental build of Docker](https://github.com/docker/docker/tree/master/experimental) has an entirely new networking system, which enables secure communication between containers on multiple hosts. In combination with Docker Swarm and Docker Compose, you can now run multi-container apps on multi-host clusters with the same tooling and configuration format you use to develop them locally.
+Compose now supports multi-host networking as standard. Read more here:
-> Note: This functionality is in the experimental stage, and contains some hacks and workarounds which will be removed as it matures.
-
-## Prerequisites
-
-Before you start, you’ll need to install the experimental build of Docker, and the latest versions of Machine and Compose.
-
-- To install the experimental Docker build on a Linux machine, follow the instructions [here](https://github.com/docker/docker/tree/master/experimental#install-docker-experimental).
-
-- To install the experimental Docker build on a Mac, run these commands:
-
- $ curl -L https://experimental.docker.com/builds/Darwin/x86_64/docker-latest > /usr/local/bin/docker
- $ chmod +x /usr/local/bin/docker
-
-- To install Machine, follow the instructions [here](https://docs.docker.com/machine/install-machine/).
-
-- To install Compose, follow the instructions [here](https://docs.docker.com/compose/install/).
-
-You’ll also need a [Docker Hub](https://hub.docker.com/account/signup/) account and a [Digital Ocean](https://www.digitalocean.com/) account.
-
-## Set up a swarm with multi-host networking
-
-Set the `DIGITALOCEAN_ACCESS_TOKEN` environment variable to a valid Digital Ocean API token, which you can generate in the [API panel](https://cloud.digitalocean.com/settings/applications).
-
- DIGITALOCEAN_ACCESS_TOKEN=abc12345
-
-Start a consul server:
-
- docker-machine create -d digitalocean --engine-install-url https://experimental.docker.com consul
- docker $(docker-machine config consul) run -d -p 8500:8500 -h consul progrium/consul -server -bootstrap
-
-(In a real world setting you’d set up a distributed consul, but that’s beyond the scope of this guide!)
-
-Create a Swarm token:
-
- SWARM_TOKEN=$(docker run swarm create)
-
-Create a Swarm master:
-
- docker-machine create -d digitalocean --swarm --swarm-master --swarm-discovery=token://$SWARM_TOKEN --engine-install-url="https://experimental.docker.com" --digitalocean-image "ubuntu-14-10-x64" --engine-opt=default-network=overlay:multihost --engine-label=com.docker.network.driver.overlay.bind_interface=eth0 --engine-opt=kv-store=consul:$(docker-machine ip consul):8500 swarm-0
-
-Create a Swarm node:
-
- docker-machine create -d digitalocean --swarm --swarm-discovery=token://$SWARM_TOKEN --engine-install-url="https://experimental.docker.com" --digitalocean-image "ubuntu-14-10-x64" --engine-opt=default-network=overlay:multihost --engine-label=com.docker.network.driver.overlay.bind_interface=eth0 --engine-opt=kv-store=consul:$(docker-machine ip consul):8500 --engine-label com.docker.network.driver.overlay.neighbor_ip=$(docker-machine ip swarm-0) swarm-1
-
-You can create more Swarm nodes if you want - it’s best to give them sensible names (swarm-2, swarm-3, etc).
-
-Finally, point Docker at your swarm:
-
- eval "$(docker-machine env --swarm swarm-0)"
-
-## Run containers and get them communicating
-
-Now that you’ve got a swarm up and running, you can create containers on it just like a single Docker instance:
-
- $ docker run busybox echo hello world
- hello world
-
-If you run `docker ps -a`, you can see what node that container was started on by looking at its name (here it’s swarm-3):
-
- $ docker ps -a
- CONTAINER ID IMAGE COMMAND CREATED STATUS PORTS NAMES
- 41f59749737b busybox "echo hello world" 15 seconds ago Exited (0) 13 seconds ago swarm-3/trusting_leakey
-
-As you start more containers, they’ll be placed on different nodes across the cluster, thanks to Swarm’s default “spread” scheduling strategy.
-
-Every container started on this swarm will use the “overlay:multihost” network by default, meaning they can all intercommunicate. Each container gets an IP address on that network, and an `/etc/hosts` file which will be updated on-the-fly with every other container’s IP address and name. That means that if you have a running container named ‘foo’, other containers can access it at the hostname ‘foo’.
-
-Let’s verify that multi-host networking is functioning. Start a long-running container:
-
- $ docker run -d --name long-running busybox top
- <container id>
-
-If you start a new container and inspect its /etc/hosts file, you’ll see the long-running container in there:
-
- $ docker run busybox cat /etc/hosts
- ...
- 172.21.0.6 long-running
-
-Verify that connectivity works between containers:
-
- $ docker run busybox ping long-running
- PING long-running (172.21.0.6): 56 data bytes
- 64 bytes from 172.21.0.6: seq=0 ttl=64 time=7.975 ms
- 64 bytes from 172.21.0.6: seq=1 ttl=64 time=1.378 ms
- 64 bytes from 172.21.0.6: seq=2 ttl=64 time=1.348 ms
- ^C
- --- long-running ping statistics ---
- 3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss
- round-trip min/avg/max = 1.140/2.099/7.975 ms
-
-## Run a Compose application
-
-Here’s an example of a simple Python + Redis app using multi-host networking on a swarm.
-
-Create a directory for the app:
-
- $ mkdir composetest
- $ cd composetest
-
-Inside this directory, create 2 files.
-
-First, create `app.py` - a simple web app that uses the Flask framework and increments a value in Redis:
-
- from flask import Flask
- from redis import Redis
- import os
- app = Flask(__name__)
- redis = Redis(host='composetest_redis_1', port=6379)
-
- @app.route('/')
- def hello():
- redis.incr('hits')
- return 'Hello World! I have been seen %s times.' % redis.get('hits')
-
- if __name__ == "__main__":
- app.run(host="0.0.0.0", debug=True)
-
-Note that we’re connecting to a host called `composetest_redis_1` - this is the name of the Redis container that Compose will start.
-
-Second, create a Dockerfile for the app container:
-
- FROM python:2.7
- RUN pip install flask redis
- ADD . /code
- WORKDIR /code
- CMD ["python", "app.py"]
-
-Build the Docker image and push it to the Hub (you’ll need a Hub account). Replace `<username>` with your Docker Hub username:
-
- $ docker build -t <username>/counter .
- $ docker push <username>/counter
-
-Next, create a `docker-compose.yml`, which defines the configuration for the web and redis containers. Once again, replace `<username>` with your Hub username:
-
- web:
- image: <username>/counter
- ports:
- - "80:5000"
- redis:
- image: redis
-
-Now start the app:
-
- $ docker-compose up -d
- Pulling web (username/counter:latest)...
- swarm-0: Pulling username/counter:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-2: Pulling username/counter:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-1: Pulling username/counter:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-3: Pulling username/counter:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-4: Pulling username/counter:latest... : downloaded
- Creating composetest_web_1...
- Pulling redis (redis:latest)...
- swarm-2: Pulling redis:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-1: Pulling redis:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-3: Pulling redis:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-4: Pulling redis:latest... : downloaded
- swarm-0: Pulling redis:latest... : downloaded
- Creating composetest_redis_1...
-
-Swarm has created containers for both web and redis, and placed them on different nodes, which you can check with `docker ps`:
-
- $ docker ps
- CONTAINER ID IMAGE COMMAND CREATED STATUS PORTS NAMES
- 92faad2135c9 redis "/entrypoint.sh redi 43 seconds ago Up 42 seconds swarm-2/composetest_redis_1
- adb809e5cdac username/counter "/bin/sh -c 'python 55 seconds ago Up 54 seconds 45.67.8.9:80->5000/tcp swarm-1/composetest_web_1
-
-You can also see that the web container has exposed port 80 on its swarm node. If you curl that IP, you’ll get a response from the container:
-
- $ curl http://45.67.8.9
- Hello World! I have been seen 1 times.
-
-If you hit it repeatedly, the counter will increment, demonstrating that the web and redis container are communicating:
-
- $ curl http://45.67.8.9
- Hello World! I have been seen 2 times.
- $ curl http://45.67.8.9
- Hello World! I have been seen 3 times.
- $ curl http://45.67.8.9
- Hello World! I have been seen 4 times.
+https://docs.docker.com/compose/networking

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