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README.md

angular-notifier

A well designed, fully animated, highly customizable, and easy-to-use notification library for your Angular 2+ application.

npm version dependency status travis ci build status Codecov Known Vulnerabilities license



Demo

You can play around with this library with this Stackblitz right here.

Angular Notifier Animated Preview GIF




How to install

You can get angular-notifier via npm by either adding it as a new dependency to your package.json file and running npm install, or running the following command:

npm install angular-notifier

Angular versions

The following list describes the compatibility with Angular:

Angular Notifier Angular
1.x 2.x
2.x 4.x
3.x 5.x
4.x 6.x

Browser support & polyfills

By default, meaning without any polyfills, angular-notifier is compatible with the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, and Opera. Bringing in the following polyfills will improve browser support:

  • To be able to use the latest and greatest JavaScript features in older browsers (e.g. older version of IE & Safari), you might want to add core-js to your polyfills.
  • For animation support (in particular, for better Web Animations API support), you might want to use the web-animations-js polyfill. For details, see the corresponding CanIUse page.

For detailed information about the Angular browser support read the official Angular browser support documentation. If you generated your Angular project with the Angular CLI, all the polyfills mentioned above do already exist in your polyfills.ts file - waiting for you to enable and install them.




How to setup

Before actually being able to use the angular-notifier library within our code, we have to first set it up within Angular, and also bring the styles into our project.


1. Import the NotifierModule

First of all, make angular-notifier globally available to your Angular application by importing (and optionally also configuring) the NotifierModule the your root Angular module. For example:

import { NotifierModule } from 'angular-notifier';

@NgModule( {
  imports: [
    NotifierModule
  ]
} )
export class AppModule {}

But wait -- your probably might want to customize your notifications' look and behaviour according to your requirements and needs. To do so, call the withConfig method on the NotifierModule, and pass in the options. For example:

import { NotifierModule } from 'angular-notifier';

@NgModule( {
  imports: [
    NotifierModule.withConfig( {
      // Custom options in here
    } )
  ]
} )
export class AppModule {}

2. Use the notifier-container component

In addition, you have to place the notifier-container component somewhere in your application, best at the last element of your root (app) component. For example:

@Component( {
  selector: 'my-app',
  template: `
    <h1>Hello World</h1>
    <notifier-container></notifier-container>
  `
} )
export class AppComponent {}

Later on, this component will contain and manage all your applications' notifications.


3. Import the styles

Of course we also need to import the angular-notifier styles into our application. Depending on the architecture of your Angular application, you want to either import the original SASS files, or the already compiled CSS files instead - or none of them if you wish to write your own styles from scratch.

The easy way: Import all the styles

To import all the styles, simple include either the ~/angular-notifier/styles.(scss|css) file. It contains the core styles as well as all the themes and notification types.

The advanced way: Only import the styles actually needed

To keep the size if your styles as small as possible (improving performance for the perfect UX), your might instead decide to only import the styles actually needed by our application. The angular-notifier styles are modular:

  • The ~/angular-notifier/styles/core.(scss|css) file is always required, it defines the basic styles (such as the layout)
  • Themes can be imported from the ~/angular-notifier/styles/theme folder
  • The different notification types, then, can be imported from the ~/angular-notifier/styles/types folder




How to use

Using angular-notifier is as simple as it can get -- simple import and inject the NotifierService into every component (directive, service, ...) you want to use in. For example:

import { NotifierService } from 'angular-notifier';

@Component( {
	// ...
} )
export class MyAwesomeComponent {

  private readonly notifier: NotifierService;

  constructor( notifierService: NotifierService ) {
    this.notifier = notifierService;
  }

}

Show notifications

Showing a notification is simple - all your need is a type, and a message to be displayed. For example:

this.notifier.notify( 'success', 'You are awesome! I mean it!' );

You can further pass in a notification ID as the third (optional) argument. Essentially, such a notification ID is nothing more but a unique string tha can be used later on to gain access (and thus control) to this specific notification. For example:

this.notifier.notify( 'success', 'You are awesome! I mean it!', 'THAT_NOTIFICATION_ID' );

For example, you might want to define a notification ID if you know that, at some point in the future, you will need to remove this exact notification.

The syntax above is actually just a shorthand version of the following:

this.notifier.show( {
  type: 'success',
  message: 'You are awesome! I mean it!',
  id: 'THAT_NOTIFICATION_ID' // Again, this is optional
} );

Hide notifications

You can also hide notifications. To hide a specific notification - assuming you've defined a notification ID when creating it, simply call:

this.notifier.hide( 'THAT_NOTIFICATION_ID' );

Furthermore, your can hide the newest notification by calling:

this.notifier.hideNewest();

Or, your could hide the oldest notification:

this.notifier.hideOldest();

And, of course, it's also possible to hide all visible notifications at once:

this.notifier.hideAll();




How to customize

From the beginning, the angular-notifier library has been written with customizability in mind. The idea is that angular-notifier works the way your want it to, so that you can make it blend perfectly into the rest of your application. Still, the default configuration should already provide a great User Experience.

Keep in mind that angular-notifier can be configured only once - which is at the time you import the NotifierModule into your root (app) module.


Position

With the position property you can define where exactly notifications will appear on the screen:

position: {

  horizontal: {

    /**
     * Defines the horizontal position on the screen
     * @type {'left' | 'middle' | 'right'}
     */
    position: 'left',

    /**
     * Defines the horizontal distance to the screen edge (in px)
     * @type {number}
     */
    distance: 12

  },

  vertical: {

    /**
     * Defines the vertical position on the screen
     * @type {'top' | 'bottom'}
     */
    position: 'bottom',

    /**
     * Defines the vertical distance to the screen edge (in px)
     * @type {number}
     */
    distance: 12

    /**
     * Defines the vertical gap, existing between multiple notifications (in px)
     * @type {number}
     */
    gap: 10

  }

}

Theme

With the theme property you can change the overall look and feel of your notifications:

/**
 * Defines the notification theme, responsible for the Visual Design of notifications
 * @type {string}
 */
theme: 'material';

Theming in detail

Well, how does theming actually work? In the end, the value set for the theme property will be part of a class added to each notification when being created. For example, using material as the theme results in all notifications getting a class assigned named x-notifier__notification--material.

Everyone - yes, I'm looking at you - can use this mechanism to write custom notification themes and apply them via the theme property. For example on how to create a theme from scratch, just take a look at the themes coming along with this library (as for now only the material theme).


Behaviour

With the behaviour property you can define how notifications will behave in different situations:

behaviour: {

  /**
   * Defines whether each notification will hide itself automatically after a timeout passes
   * @type {number | false}
   */
  autoHide: 5000,

  /**
   * Defines what happens when someone clicks on a notification
   * @type {'hide' | false}
   */
  onClick: false,

  /**
   * Defines what happens when someone hovers over a notification
   * @type {'pauseAutoHide' | 'resetAutoHide' | false}
   */
  onMouseover: 'pauseAutoHide',

  /**
   * Defines whether the dismiss button is visible or not
   * @type {boolean}
   */
  showDismissButton: true,

  /**
   * Defines whether multiple notification will be stacked, and how high the stack limit is
   * @type {number | false}
   */
  stacking: 4

}

Custom Templates

If you need more control over how the inner HTML part of the notification looks like, either because your style-guide requires it, or for being able to add icons etc, then you can define a custom <ng-template> which you pass to the NotifierService.

You can define a custom ng-template as follows:

<ng-template #customNotification let-notificationData="notification">
	<my-custom-alert type="notificationData.type">
		{{ notificationData.message }}
	</my-custom-alert>
</ng-template>

In this case you could wrap your own HTML, even a <my-custom-alert> component which you might use in your application. The notification data is passed in as a notification object, which you can reference inside the <ng-template> using the let- syntax.

Inside your component, you can then reference the <ng-template> by its template variable #customNotification using Angular's ViewChild:

import { ViewChild } from '@angular/core'
...
@Component({...})
export class SomeComponent {
	@ViewChild('customNotification') customNotificationTmpl;
   ...
   constructor(private notifierService: NotifierService) {}

   showNotification() {
	   const msg = {
		   message: 'Hi there!',
		   type: 'info'
	   };

	   this.notifier.show({
		   message: msg.message,
		   type: msg.messageType,
		   template: this.customNotificationTmpl
		});
   }
}

Animations

With the animations property your can define whether and how exactly notification will be animated:

animations: {

  /**
   * Defines whether all (!) animations are enabled or disabled
   * @type {boolean}
   */
  enabled: true,

  show: {

    /**
     * Defines the animation preset that will be used to animate a new notification in
     * @type {'fade' | 'slide'}
     */
    preset: 'slide',

    /**
     * Defines how long it will take to animate a new notification in (in ms)
     * @type {number}
     */
    speed: 300,

    /**
     * Defines which easing method will be used when animating a new notification in
     * @type {'linear' | 'ease' | 'ease-in' | 'ease-out' | 'ease-in-out'}
     */
    easing: 'ease'

  },

  hide: {

    /**
     * Defines the animation preset that will be used to animate a new notification out
     * @type {'fade' | 'slide'}
     */
    preset: 'fade',

    /**
     * Defines how long it will take to animate a new notification out (in ms)
     * @type {number}
     */
    speed: 300,

    /**
     * Defines which easing method will be used when animating a new notification out
     * @type {'linear' | 'ease' | 'ease-in' | 'ease-out' | 'ease-in-out'}
     */
    easing: 'ease',

    /**
     * Defines the animation offset used when hiding multiple notifications at once (in ms)
     * @type {number | false}
     */
    offset: 50

  },

  shift: {

    /**
     * Defines how long it will take to shift a notification around (in ms)
     * @type {number}
     */
    speed: 300,

    /**
     * Defines which easing method will be used when shifting a notification around
     * @type {string}
     */
    easing: 'ease' // All standard CSS easing methods work

  },

  /**
   * Defines the overall animation overlap, allowing for much smoother looking animations (in ms)
   * @type {number | false}
   */
  overlap: 150

}

In short -- the default configuration

To sum it up, the following is the default configuration (copy-paste-friendly):

const notifierDefaultOptions: NotifierOptions = {
  position: {
    horizontal: {
      position: 'left',
      distance: 12
    },
    vertical: {
      position: 'bottom',
      distance: 12,
      gap: 10
    }
  },
  theme: 'material',
  behaviour: {
    autoHide: 5000,
    onClick: false,
    onMouseover: 'pauseAutoHide',
    showDismissButton: true,
    stacking: 4
  },
  animations: {
    enabled: true,
    show: {
      preset: 'slide',
      speed: 300,
      easing: 'ease'
    },
    hide: {
      preset: 'fade',
      speed: 300,
      easing: 'ease',
      offset: 50
    },
    shift: {
      speed: 300,
      easing: 'ease'
    },
    overlap: 150
  }
};




Creator

Dominique Müller

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