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Incorporate Ivan's edits, fix the zipball name that he changed, and u…

…pdate SVG description to list the browsers that it doesn't support
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1 parent db3c5e7 commit 4d61d199cae64843dedf1f2153c372c4b191d185 Davide P. Cervone committed Feb 26, 2012
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17 docs/html/_sources/configuration.txt
@@ -326,17 +326,12 @@ Using in-line configuration options
===================================
The second way to configure MathJax is through `in-line configuration`,
-which puts the configuration options within the web page itself. This
-process was changed in version 1.1 to make it compatible with HTML5.
-Earlier versions of MathJax had in-line configuration included within the
-content of the ``<script>`` tag that loads ``MathJax.js``, but HTML5 makes
-it illegal to have content for a script with a ``src`` attribute.
-
-MathJax solves this problem by using separate ``<script>`` tags to
-perform the configuration for and loading of MathJax. Because MathJax
-starts its configuration process as soon as it is loaded, the
-configuration script must come **before** the script tag that loads
-``MathJax.js`` itself. You do this by including a ``<script>`` with
+which puts the configuration options within the web page itself. The use
+of in-line configuration with MathJax requires two separate ``<script>``
+tags: one for specifying the configuration settings and one for loading of
+MathJax. Because MathJax starts its configuration process as soon as it is
+loaded, the configuration script must come **before** the script tag that
+loads ``MathJax.js`` itself. You do this by including a ``<script>`` with
``type="text/x-mathjax-config"`` whose content will be run when
MathJax performs its configuration. Generally, this script will
include a :meth:`MathJax.Hub.Config()` call to perform MathJax
View
6 docs/html/_sources/installation.txt
@@ -96,20 +96,20 @@ to get a list of the available branches. There are separate branches
for the main releases, but with ``-latest`` appended. These contain
all the patches for that particular release. You can check out one of
the branches just as you would a tagged copy. For example, the branch
-for the ``v1.1`` tagged release is ``v1.1-latest``. To get this
+for the ``v2.0`` tagged release is ``v2.0-latest``. To get this
release, use
.. code-block:: sh
cd MathJax
- git checkout v1.1-latest
+ git checkout v2.0-latest
and to update it when changes occur, use
.. code-block:: sh
cd MathJax
- git pull origin v1.1-latest
+ git pull origin v2.0-latest
.. _getting-mathjax-svn:
View
42 docs/html/_sources/output.txt
@@ -43,25 +43,29 @@ more math is processed. MathJax version 2.0 includes a number of
optimizations to improve the display performance in IE, and it is now
more comparable to other browsers. The HTML-CSS output uses web-based
fonts so that users don't have to have math fonts installed on their
-computers; but this does introduce some printing issues in some
-browsers.
-
-The **SVG output processor** is new in MathJax version 2.0, and it uses
-`Scalable Vector Graphics` to render the mathematics on the page. SVG
-is supported in all the major browsers and most mobile devices; note,
-however, that Internet Explorer prior to IE9 does not support SVG, and
-IE9 only does in "IE9 standards mode", not its emulation modes for
-earlier versions. The SVG output mode is high quality and slightly
-faster than HTML-CSS, and it does not suffer from some of the
+computers, which introduces some printing issues in certain browsers.
+
+The **SVG output processor** is new in MathJax version 2.0, and it
+uses `Scalable Vector Graphics` to render the mathematics on the page.
+SVG is supported in all the major browsers and most mobile devices;
+note, however, that Internet Explorer prior to IE9 does not support
+SVG, and IE9 only does in "IE9 standards mode", not its emulation
+modes for earlier versions. The SVG output mode is high quality and
+slightly faster than HTML-CSS, and it does not suffer from some of the
font-related issues that HTML-CSS does, so prints well in all
browsers. This format also works well in some ebook readers (e.g.,
-iBooks). The disadvantage of this mode is that it does not take
-advantage of STIX fonts, and so only has access to the characters in
-the web-based fonts, and it variable-width tables become fixed size
-once they are typeset, and don't rescale if the window size changes
-(for example). Since equation numbers are handled through
+iBooks). The disadvantages of this mode are the following: first,
+Internet Explorer only supports SVG in IE9 and later versions (and
+then only in IE9 standards mode or above), and some versions of the
+Android Internet browser don't have SVG enabled. Second, it does not
+take advantage of STIX fonts, and so only has access to the characters
+in the web-based fonts, and third, its variable-width tables become
+fixed size once they are typeset, and don't rescale if the window size
+changes (for example). Since equation numbers are handled through
variable-width tables, that means equation numbers may not stay at the
-edge of the window if it is resized.
+edge of the window if it is resized. For these reasons it is probably
+best not to force the use of SVG output unless you have some control
+over the browsers that are used to view your documents.
The **NativeMML output processor** uses the browser's internal MathML
support (if any) to render the mathematics. Currently, Firefox has
@@ -73,12 +77,12 @@ don't recommend using the NativeMML output processor with Opera.
Safari has some support for MathML since version 5.1, but the quality
is not as high as either Firefox's implementation or IE with MathPlayer.
Chrome, Konqueror, and most other browsers don't support MathML
-natively, but may in the future, since MathML is part of the HTML5
-specification.
+natively, but this may change in the future, since MathML is part of
+the HTML5 specification.
The advantage of the NativeMML output Processor is its speed, since
native MathML support is much faster than using complicated HTML and
-CSS to lay out mathematics, as the HTML-CSS output processor does.
+CSS to typeset mathematics, as the HTML-CSS output processor does.
The disadvantage is that you are dependent on the browser's MathML
implementation for your rendering, and these vary in quality of output
and completeness of implementation. MathJax relies on features that
View
19 docs/html/_sources/start.txt
@@ -5,13 +5,14 @@ Getting Started
***************
MathJax allows you to include mathematics in your web pages, either
-using TeX and LaTeX notation, MathML, or AsciiMath notation, and you
-can even use all three in the same document.
+using LaTeX, MathML, or AsciiMath notation, and the mathematics
+will be processed using javascript to produce HTML, SVG or MathML
+equations for viewing in any modern browser.
There are two ways to access MathJax: the easiest way is to use the
copy of MathJax available from our distributed network service at
``cdn.mathjax.org``, but you can also download and install a copy of
-MathJax on your own server, or use it locally on your own hard disk
+MathJax on your own server, or use it locally on your hard disk
(with no need for network access). All three of these are described
below, with links to more detailed explanations. This page gives the
quickest and easiest ways to get MathJax up and running on your web
@@ -105,14 +106,14 @@ hard disk.
Obtaining and Installing MathJax
--------------------------------
-The easiest way to set up MathJax is to obtain the v1.1 archive from
+The easiest way to set up MathJax is to obtain the v2.0 archive from
the `MathJax download page <http://www.mathjax.org/download/>`_ (you
should obtain a file named something like
-``mathjax-MathJax-v1.1-X-XXXXXXXX.zip``, where the X's are
-random-looking letters and numbers). This archive includes both the
-MathJax code and the MathJax webfonts, so it is the only file you
-need. Note that this is different from v1.0 and earlier releases,
-which had the fonts separate from the rest of the code.
+``mathjax-MathJax-v2.0-X-XXXXXXXX.zip`` where the X's are random
+looking numbers and letters). This archive includes both the MathJax
+code and the MathJax webfonts, so it is the only file you need. Note
+that this is different from v1.0 and earlier releases, which had the
+fonts separate from the rest of the code.
Unpack the archive and place the resulting MathJax folder onto your
web server at a convenient location where you can include it into your
View
3 docs/html/_sources/tex.txt
@@ -281,7 +281,8 @@ Autmatic Equation Numering
==========================
New in MathJax v2.0 is the ability to have equations be numbered
-automatically. This is off by default, so that pages don't change
+automatically. This functionality is turned off by default, so
+that pages don't change
when you update from v1.1 to v2.0, but it is easy to configure MathJax
to produce automatic equation numbers by adding:
View
16 docs/html/configuration.html
@@ -326,16 +326,12 @@
<div class="section" id="using-in-line-configuration-options">
<span id="inline-config"></span><h2>Using in-line configuration options<a class="headerlink" href="#using-in-line-configuration-options" title="Permalink to this headline">¶</a></h2>
<p>The second way to configure MathJax is through <cite>in-line configuration</cite>,
-which puts the configuration options within the web page itself. This
-process was changed in version 1.1 to make it compatible with HTML5.
-Earlier versions of MathJax had in-line configuration included within the
-content of the <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">&lt;script&gt;</span></tt> tag that loads <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">MathJax.js</span></tt>, but HTML5 makes
-it illegal to have content for a script with a <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">src</span></tt> attribute.</p>
-<p>MathJax solves this problem by using separate <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">&lt;script&gt;</span></tt> tags to
-perform the configuration for and loading of MathJax. Because MathJax
-starts its configuration process as soon as it is loaded, the
-configuration script must come <strong>before</strong> the script tag that loads
-<tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">MathJax.js</span></tt> itself. You do this by including a <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">&lt;script&gt;</span></tt> with
+which puts the configuration options within the web page itself. The use
+of in-line configuration with MathJax requires two separate <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">&lt;script&gt;</span></tt>
+tags: one for specifying the configuration settings and one for loading of
+MathJax. Because MathJax starts its configuration process as soon as it is
+loaded, the configuration script must come <strong>before</strong> the script tag that
+loads <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">MathJax.js</span></tt> itself. You do this by including a <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">&lt;script&gt;</span></tt> with
<tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">type=&quot;text/x-mathjax-config&quot;</span></tt> whose content will be run when
MathJax performs its configuration. Generally, this script will
include a <tt class="xref py py-meth docutils literal"><span class="pre">MathJax.Hub.Config()</span></tt> call to perform MathJax
View
6 docs/html/installation.html
@@ -118,15 +118,15 @@
for the main releases, but with <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">-latest</span></tt> appended. These contain
all the patches for that particular release. You can check out one of
the branches just as you would a tagged copy. For example, the branch
-for the <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">v1.1</span></tt> tagged release is <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">v1.1-latest</span></tt>. To get this
+for the <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">v2.0</span></tt> tagged release is <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">v2.0-latest</span></tt>. To get this
release, use</p>
<div class="highlight-sh"><div class="highlight"><pre><span class="nb">cd </span>MathJax
-git checkout v1.1-latest
+git checkout v2.0-latest
</pre></div>
</div>
<p>and to update it when changes occur, use</p>
<div class="highlight-sh"><div class="highlight"><pre><span class="nb">cd </span>MathJax
-git pull origin v1.1-latest
+git pull origin v2.0-latest
</pre></div>
</div>
</div>
View
40 docs/html/output.html
@@ -85,24 +85,28 @@
optimizations to improve the display performance in IE, and it is now
more comparable to other browsers. The HTML-CSS output uses web-based
fonts so that users don&#8217;t have to have math fonts installed on their
-computers; but this does introduce some printing issues in some
-browsers.</p>
-<p>The <strong>SVG output processor</strong> is new in MathJax version 2.0, and it uses
-<cite>Scalable Vector Graphics</cite> to render the mathematics on the page. SVG
-is supported in all the major browsers and most mobile devices; note,
-however, that Internet Explorer prior to IE9 does not support SVG, and
-IE9 only does in &#8220;IE9 standards mode&#8221;, not its emulation modes for
-earlier versions. The SVG output mode is high quality and slightly
-faster than HTML-CSS, and it does not suffer from some of the
+computers, which introduces some printing issues in certain browsers.</p>
+<p>The <strong>SVG output processor</strong> is new in MathJax version 2.0, and it
+uses <cite>Scalable Vector Graphics</cite> to render the mathematics on the page.
+SVG is supported in all the major browsers and most mobile devices;
+note, however, that Internet Explorer prior to IE9 does not support
+SVG, and IE9 only does in &#8220;IE9 standards mode&#8221;, not its emulation
+modes for earlier versions. The SVG output mode is high quality and
+slightly faster than HTML-CSS, and it does not suffer from some of the
font-related issues that HTML-CSS does, so prints well in all
browsers. This format also works well in some ebook readers (e.g.,
-iBooks). The disadvantage of this mode is that it does not take
-advantage of STIX fonts, and so only has access to the characters in
-the web-based fonts, and it variable-width tables become fixed size
-once they are typeset, and don&#8217;t rescale if the window size changes
-(for example). Since equation numbers are handled through
+iBooks). The disadvantages of this mode are the following: first,
+Internet Explorer only supports SVG in IE9 and later versions (and
+then only in IE9 standards mode or above), and some versions of the
+Android Internet browser don&#8217;t have SVG enabled. Second, it does not
+take advantage of STIX fonts, and so only has access to the characters
+in the web-based fonts, and third, its variable-width tables become
+fixed size once they are typeset, and don&#8217;t rescale if the window size
+changes (for example). Since equation numbers are handled through
variable-width tables, that means equation numbers may not stay at the
-edge of the window if it is resized.</p>
+edge of the window if it is resized. For these reasons it is probably
+best not to force the use of SVG output unless you have some control
+over the browsers that are used to view your documents.</p>
<p>The <strong>NativeMML output processor</strong> uses the browser&#8217;s internal MathML
support (if any) to render the mathematics. Currently, Firefox has
native support for MathML, and IE has the <a class="reference external" href="http://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathplayer/">MathPlayer plugin</a> for rendering
@@ -112,11 +116,11 @@
Safari has some support for MathML since version 5.1, but the quality
is not as high as either Firefox&#8217;s implementation or IE with MathPlayer.
Chrome, Konqueror, and most other browsers don&#8217;t support MathML
-natively, but may in the future, since MathML is part of the HTML5
-specification.</p>
+natively, but this may change in the future, since MathML is part of
+the HTML5 specification.</p>
<p>The advantage of the NativeMML output Processor is its speed, since
native MathML support is much faster than using complicated HTML and
-CSS to lay out mathematics, as the HTML-CSS output processor does.
+CSS to typeset mathematics, as the HTML-CSS output processor does.
The disadvantage is that you are dependent on the browser&#8217;s MathML
implementation for your rendering, and these vary in quality of output
and completeness of implementation. MathJax relies on features that
View
2 docs/html/searchindex.js
1 addition, 1 deletion not shown because the diff is too large. Please use a local Git client to view these changes.
View
19 docs/html/start.html
@@ -52,12 +52,13 @@
<div class="section" id="getting-started">
<span id="id1"></span><h1>Getting Started<a class="headerlink" href="#getting-started" title="Permalink to this headline">¶</a></h1>
<p>MathJax allows you to include mathematics in your web pages, either
-using TeX and LaTeX notation, MathML, or AsciiMath notation, and you
-can even use all three in the same document.</p>
+using LaTeX, MathML, or AsciiMath notation, and the mathematics
+will be processed using javascript to produce HTML, SVG or MathML
+equations for viewing in any modern browser.</p>
<p>There are two ways to access MathJax: the easiest way is to use the
copy of MathJax available from our distributed network service at
<tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">cdn.mathjax.org</span></tt>, but you can also download and install a copy of
-MathJax on your own server, or use it locally on your own hard disk
+MathJax on your own server, or use it locally on your hard disk
(with no need for network access). All three of these are described
below, with links to more detailed explanations. This page gives the
quickest and easiest ways to get MathJax up and running on your web
@@ -129,14 +130,14 @@
</ol>
<div class="section" id="obtaining-and-installing-mathjax">
<h3>Obtaining and Installing MathJax<a class="headerlink" href="#obtaining-and-installing-mathjax" title="Permalink to this headline">¶</a></h3>
-<p>The easiest way to set up MathJax is to obtain the v1.1 archive from
+<p>The easiest way to set up MathJax is to obtain the v2.0 archive from
the <a class="reference external" href="http://www.mathjax.org/download/">MathJax download page</a> (you
should obtain a file named something like
-<tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">mathjax-MathJax-v1.1-X-XXXXXXXX.zip</span></tt>, where the X&#8217;s are
-random-looking letters and numbers). This archive includes both the
-MathJax code and the MathJax webfonts, so it is the only file you
-need. Note that this is different from v1.0 and earlier releases,
-which had the fonts separate from the rest of the code.</p>
+<tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">mathjax-MathJax-v2.0-X-XXXXXXXX.zip</span></tt> where the X&#8217;s are random
+looking numbers and letters). This archive includes both the MathJax
+code and the MathJax webfonts, so it is the only file you need. Note
+that this is different from v1.0 and earlier releases, which had the
+fonts separate from the rest of the code.</p>
<p>Unpack the archive and place the resulting MathJax folder onto your
web server at a convenient location where you can include it into your
web pages. For example, making <tt class="docutils literal"><span class="pre">MathJax</span></tt> a top-level directory on
View
3 docs/html/tex.html
@@ -277,7 +277,8 @@
<div class="section" id="autmatic-equation-numering">
<span id="tex-eq-numbers"></span><h2>Autmatic Equation Numering<a class="headerlink" href="#autmatic-equation-numering" title="Permalink to this headline">¶</a></h2>
<p>New in MathJax v2.0 is the ability to have equations be numbered
-automatically. This is off by default, so that pages don&#8217;t change
+automatically. This functionality is turned off by default, so
+that pages don&#8217;t change
when you update from v1.1 to v2.0, but it is easy to configure MathJax
to produce automatic equation numbers by adding:</p>
<div class="highlight-html"><div class="highlight"><pre><span class="nt">&lt;script </span><span class="na">type=</span><span class="s">&quot;text/x-mathjax-config&quot;</span><span class="nt">&gt;</span>
View
31 docs/source/output.rst
@@ -45,22 +45,27 @@ more comparable to other browsers. The HTML-CSS output uses web-based
fonts so that users don't have to have math fonts installed on their
computers, which introduces some printing issues in certain browsers.
-The **SVG output processor** is new in MathJax version 2.0, and it uses
-`Scalable Vector Graphics` to render the mathematics on the page. SVG
-is supported in all the major browsers and most mobile devices; note,
-however, that Internet Explorer prior to IE9 does not support SVG, and
-IE9 only does in "IE9 standards mode", not its emulation modes for
-earlier versions. The SVG output mode is high quality and slightly
-faster than HTML-CSS, and it does not suffer from some of the
+The **SVG output processor** is new in MathJax version 2.0, and it
+uses `Scalable Vector Graphics` to render the mathematics on the page.
+SVG is supported in all the major browsers and most mobile devices;
+note, however, that Internet Explorer prior to IE9 does not support
+SVG, and IE9 only does in "IE9 standards mode", not its emulation
+modes for earlier versions. The SVG output mode is high quality and
+slightly faster than HTML-CSS, and it does not suffer from some of the
font-related issues that HTML-CSS does, so prints well in all
browsers. This format also works well in some ebook readers (e.g.,
-iBooks). The disadvantage of this mode is that it does not take
-advantage of STIX fonts, and so only has access to the characters in
-the web-based fonts, and it variable-width tables become fixed size
-once they are typeset, and don't rescale if the window size changes
-(for example). Since equation numbers are handled through
+iBooks). The disadvantages of this mode are the following: first,
+Internet Explorer only supports SVG in IE9 and later versions (and
+then only in IE9 standards mode or above), and some versions of the
+Android Internet browser don't have SVG enabled. Second, it does not
+take advantage of STIX fonts, and so only has access to the characters
+in the web-based fonts, and third, its variable-width tables become
+fixed size once they are typeset, and don't rescale if the window size
+changes (for example). Since equation numbers are handled through
variable-width tables, that means equation numbers may not stay at the
-edge of the window if it is resized.
+edge of the window if it is resized. For these reasons it is probably
+best not to force the use of SVG output unless you have some control
+over the browsers that are used to view your documents.
The **NativeMML output processor** uses the browser's internal MathML
support (if any) to render the mathematics. Currently, Firefox has
View
10 docs/source/start.rst
@@ -108,10 +108,12 @@ Obtaining and Installing MathJax
The easiest way to set up MathJax is to obtain the v2.0 archive from
the `MathJax download page <http://www.mathjax.org/download/>`_ (you
-should obtain a file named something like ``mathjax-MathJax-v2.0?.zip``).
-This archive includes both the MathJax code and the MathJax webfonts,
-so it is the only file you need. Note that this is different from v1.0
-and earlier releases, which had the fonts separate from the rest of the code.
+should obtain a file named something like
+``mathjax-MathJax-v2.0-X-XXXXXXXX.zip`` where the X's are random
+looking numbers and letters). This archive includes both the MathJax
+code and the MathJax webfonts, so it is the only file you need. Note
+that this is different from v1.0 and earlier releases, which had the
+fonts separate from the rest of the code.
Unpack the archive and place the resulting MathJax folder onto your
web server at a convenient location where you can include it into your

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