GUI to analyze and measure voices using paselmouth praat.
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readme.MD

This is a GUI that measures and manipulates voices using scripts from my and others' research. The main program is: utils_gui.py Please use anaconda to make sure you have the rest of the dependencies, and install parselmouth with 'pip install praat-parselmouth' as it is only on pypi, not conda. Parselmouth is the praat code accessed by python. The functions are the same, just interfaced with Python. https://parselmouth.readthedocs.io/en/latest/index.html

But wait... there's more. You can use this in your lab to help you do other stuff related to research. You can make obfusticated participant ID numbers using a hash function. You can invert images, filp them, and invert their colour. You can rename files. You can search for a bunch of voice files on your hard drive and have it copy them all into the same folder. You can glue a bunch of csv files (e.g. output from a PsychoPy experiment, or whatever software you use) together and make it into an xlsx file. You can use it to create a csv file out of the buttons your participants pressed if you use a drum machine to trigger wav files, and record that as a midi file. You can email yourself. You can ask for help, but the help file is a little old...

Voice measurements are currently set to measure male voices, you'll need to edit the code until I update it. The manipulation part asks you for settings. To measure female voices, search and replace 75 to 100, 300 to 500, and 5000 to 5500 in the measure.py file.

When it asks you for settings in the manipulation menu, in my papers, I use:
F0min female=100; male=75 (unless you are manipulating voices to near 80Hz or lower, then I use 50Hz or 60Hz as F0min - always use the same numbers for measurement and manipulation).

F0max female=500; male=300
These are the default measurement settings from the Praat manual http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/.

In my papers I use +/- 0.5 ERB for pitch manipulation.

You'll need to edit the email function and give it your gmail credentials to make it work. You'll also need to set up gmail api access.

If you use this in an academic publication, please cite me:

Feinberg, D. R. (2018, December 4). Voice Lab Software. https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/3YMWQ.

You can cite pareselmouth here:

Jadoul, Y., Thompson, B., & de Boer, B. (2018). Introducing Parselmouth: A Python interface to Praat. Journal of Phonetics, 71, 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wocn.2018.07.001

You can cite Praat here:
Boersma, Paul & Weenink, David (2018). Praat: doing phonetics by computer [Computer program]. Version 6.0.43, retrieved 8 September 2018 from http://www.praat.org/

There are also many references to the equations used to estimate vocal-tract length embedded in the code itself, but here are those papers:

Puts, D., & Cardenas, R. (2018, December 3). Voice scripts. https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/K2BHS

Fitch, W. T. (1997). Vocal tract length and formant frequency dispersion correlate with body size in rhesus macaques. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 102(2), 1213-1222.

Pisanski, K., & Rendall, D. (2011). The prioritization of voice fundamental frequency or formants in listeners’ assessments of speaker size, masculinity, and attractiveness. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 129(4), 2201-2212. In [45]:

Smith, D. R., & Patterson, R. D. (2005). The interaction of glottal-pulse rate and vocal-tract length in judgements of speaker size, sex, and age. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 118(5), 3177-3186.

Fitch, W. T. (1997). Vocal tract length and formant frequency dispersion correlate with body size in rhesus macaques. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 102(2), 1213-1222.

Reby,D.,& McComb,K.(2003). Anatomical constraints generate honesty: acoustic cues to age and weight in the roars of red deer stags. Animal Behaviour, 65, 519e-530.

This page is indexed at https://osf.io/3ymwq/

No warranties, no guarantees, no promises.