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incorrect mappings in openssl-rfc.mapping.html #851

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lunaqdm opened this Issue Oct 10, 2017 · 1 comment

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lunaqdm commented Oct 10, 2017

There seem to be a few incorrect mappings present in the table at https://testssl.sh/openssl-rfc.mapping.html.

Specifically, the ones I've found are:
0x2c - 0x2e: seem to have the incorrect OpenSSL name (though I wasn't able to find the correct names in any OpenSSL documentation, so I can't verify this)
0xcc13 - 0xcc15: I am fairly certain that the cipher suites given by the table do not actually correspond to these numbers (and are not a complete listing of the cipher suites from the RFC), see https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7905#section-3

@drwetter drwetter closed this in 6bd1c26 Oct 10, 2017

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drwetter Oct 10, 2017

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Thx. Generally ~/etc/cipher-mapping.txt --which is used by testssl.sh 2.9+ --is more up to date. If you or somebody else feels like contributing: either an automated generation from the txt file would be
great or manual sync would be appreciated.

FYI: 0xcc13 - 0xcc15 are the old AGL ciphers which were later superseded by the new ones which made it into a RFC. The naming scheme from the old ciphers is partly private (openssl name space) and partly borrowed from SSLlabs.

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drwetter commented Oct 10, 2017

Thx. Generally ~/etc/cipher-mapping.txt --which is used by testssl.sh 2.9+ --is more up to date. If you or somebody else feels like contributing: either an automated generation from the txt file would be
great or manual sync would be appreciated.

FYI: 0xcc13 - 0xcc15 are the old AGL ciphers which were later superseded by the new ones which made it into a RFC. The naming scheme from the old ciphers is partly private (openssl name space) and partly borrowed from SSLlabs.

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