Add a vagrant (http://vagrantup.com/) Ubuntu 11.10 vm that can be used for testing #37

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msabramo commented Jul 4, 2012

To use this, you will need to install VirtualBox and Vagrant.

Then do:

cd vagrant
vagrant up    # This part will take several minutes; feel free to grab a cup of coffee
vagrant ssh

If all goes well, you have a fresh new Ubuntu 11.10 vm. There is a clone of the dtrace4linux repo in /home/vagrant/dtrace4linux and dtrace has already been installed and the kernel module loaded and is ready for playing around with.

Enjoy!

Add a vagrant (http://vagrantup.com/) Ubuntu 11.10 vm that can be use…
…d for testing.

cd vagrant && vagrant up && vagrant ssh
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I am wondering also if it might be useful to provide ready-made virtual machines (say for VirtualBox, VMware Fusion, and VMware Player -- I wonder if a vm in OVF/OVA format might be usable for all?) with DTrace installed so that people can try it out and start to appreciate the power of what they can do with DTrace without having to go through the effort of building and setting it up? Even if it's not hard to set up DTrace, I think people may think that it will be hard and that will be something that makes them resist trying out the technology. Lowering the barrier to entry could help to get more users and contributors.

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msabramo commented Jul 4, 2012

I am wondering also if it might be useful to provide ready-made virtual machines (say for VirtualBox, VMware Fusion, and VMware Player -- I wonder if a vm in OVF/OVA format might be usable for all?) with DTrace installed so that people can try it out and start to appreciate the power of what they can do with DTrace without having to go through the effort of building and setting it up? Even if it's not hard to set up DTrace, I think people may think that it will be hard and that will be something that makes them resist trying out the technology. Lowering the barrier to entry could help to get more users and contributors.

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dtrace4linux Jul 4, 2012

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Marc - can you elaborate on what vagrant is doing? Is this just a store of
"precanned" vms?

On 4 July 2012 09:06, Marc Abramowitz <
reply@reply.github.com

wrote:

To use this, you will need to install VirtualBox and Vagrant.

Then do:

cd vagrant
vagrant up    # This part will take several minutes; feel free to grab a
cup of coffee
vagrant ssh

If all goes well, you have a fresh new Ubuntu 11.10 vm. There is a clone
of the dtrace4linux repo in
/home/vagrant/dtrace4linux and dtrace has already been installed and the
kernel module loaded and is ready for playing around with.

Enjoy!


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub:
#37

Owner

dtrace4linux commented Jul 4, 2012

Marc - can you elaborate on what vagrant is doing? Is this just a store of
"precanned" vms?

On 4 July 2012 09:06, Marc Abramowitz <
reply@reply.github.com

wrote:

To use this, you will need to install VirtualBox and Vagrant.

Then do:

cd vagrant
vagrant up    # This part will take several minutes; feel free to grab a
cup of coffee
vagrant ssh

If all goes well, you have a fresh new Ubuntu 11.10 vm. There is a clone
of the dtrace4linux repo in
/home/vagrant/dtrace4linux and dtrace has already been installed and the
kernel module loaded and is ready for playing around with.

Enjoy!


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub:
#37

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msabramo Jul 5, 2012

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Well, vagrant is sort of a layer on top of VirtualBox and a configuration management system such as Puppet.

It lets you specify a textual "recipe" for creating a vm. This is the Vagrantfile. It lets you specify a base "box", in this case an Ubuntu 11.10 box that vagrant will download the first time you use a Vagrantfile which references that box. You can also specify some basic parameters like the network configuration - e.g.: host-only, bridged, etc. and you can specify a Puppet manifest or Chef recipe to execute in the new vm after it has booted. My Vagrantfile references a Puppet manifest with a .pp extension. This ensures that the git-core package is installed and executes git clone and make all and make install and make load. The vagrant up command creates the vm and starts it in VirtualBox in a headless mode so you don't see the VirtualBox GUI or the vm console - instead you use vagrant ssh to interact with the vm.

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msabramo commented Jul 5, 2012

Well, vagrant is sort of a layer on top of VirtualBox and a configuration management system such as Puppet.

It lets you specify a textual "recipe" for creating a vm. This is the Vagrantfile. It lets you specify a base "box", in this case an Ubuntu 11.10 box that vagrant will download the first time you use a Vagrantfile which references that box. You can also specify some basic parameters like the network configuration - e.g.: host-only, bridged, etc. and you can specify a Puppet manifest or Chef recipe to execute in the new vm after it has booted. My Vagrantfile references a Puppet manifest with a .pp extension. This ensures that the git-core package is installed and executes git clone and make all and make install and make load. The vagrant up command creates the vm and starts it in VirtualBox in a headless mode so you don't see the VirtualBox GUI or the vm console - instead you use vagrant ssh to interact with the vm.

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OK, I messed around with taking the vm that I created with Vagrant and used VirtualBox to export it to an OVA archive. I can import this to VirtualBox on OS X and create an instant vm with DTrace (even faster to get going than using Vagrant to build the vm). It would be great if others could test this out and give me feedback:

https://github.com/downloads/msabramo/linux/dtrace4linux%20Ubuntu%2011.10.ova

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msabramo commented Jul 5, 2012

OK, I messed around with taking the vm that I created with Vagrant and used VirtualBox to export it to an OVA archive. I can import this to VirtualBox on OS X and create an instant vm with DTrace (even faster to get going than using Vagrant to build the vm). It would be great if others could test this out and give me feedback:

https://github.com/downloads/msabramo/linux/dtrace4linux%20Ubuntu%2011.10.ova

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dtrace4linux Jul 5, 2012

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Thank you Marc for nicely summarising this.
On Jul 5, 2012 1:06 AM, "Marc Abramowitz" <
reply@reply.github.com>
wrote:

Well, vagrant is sort of a layer on top of VirtualBox and a configuration
management system such as Puppet.

It lets you specify a textual "recipe" for creating a vm. This is the
Vagrantfile. It lets you specify a base "box", in this case an Ubuntu 11.10
box that vagrant will download the first time you use a Vagrantfile which
references that box. You can also specify some basic parameters like the
network configuration - e.g.: host-only, bridged, etc. and you can specify
a Puppet manifest or Chef recipe to execute in the new vm after it has
booted. My Vagrantfile references a Puppet manifest with a .pp extension.
This ensures that the git-core package is installed and executes git clone
and make all and make install and make load. The vagrant up command
creates the vm and starts it in VirtualBox in a headless mode so you don't
see the VirtualBox GUI or the vm console - instead you use vagrant ssh to
interact with the vm.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub:
#37 (comment)

Owner

dtrace4linux commented Jul 5, 2012

Thank you Marc for nicely summarising this.
On Jul 5, 2012 1:06 AM, "Marc Abramowitz" <
reply@reply.github.com>
wrote:

Well, vagrant is sort of a layer on top of VirtualBox and a configuration
management system such as Puppet.

It lets you specify a textual "recipe" for creating a vm. This is the
Vagrantfile. It lets you specify a base "box", in this case an Ubuntu 11.10
box that vagrant will download the first time you use a Vagrantfile which
references that box. You can also specify some basic parameters like the
network configuration - e.g.: host-only, bridged, etc. and you can specify
a Puppet manifest or Chef recipe to execute in the new vm after it has
booted. My Vagrantfile references a Puppet manifest with a .pp extension.
This ensures that the git-core package is installed and executes git clone
and make all and make install and make load. The vagrant up command
creates the vm and starts it in VirtualBox in a headless mode so you don't
see the VirtualBox GUI or the vm console - instead you use vagrant ssh to
interact with the vm.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub:
#37 (comment)

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msabramo Jul 5, 2012

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And here is a .vmwarem vm that I created with VMware Fusion (it may or may not work with other VMware products such as VMware Player). It would be great if others could test this out and give me feedback:

https://github.com/downloads/msabramo/linux/dtrace4linux%20Ubuntu%2011.10.vmwarevm.tar.gz

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msabramo commented Jul 5, 2012

And here is a .vmwarem vm that I created with VMware Fusion (it may or may not work with other VMware products such as VMware Player). It would be great if others could test this out and give me feedback:

https://github.com/downloads/msabramo/linux/dtrace4linux%20Ubuntu%2011.10.vmwarevm.tar.gz

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And here is an OVA file with a 32-bit Ubuntu system. I was able to import this into VMware Player on Windows 7, so this may be useful too:

https://github.com/downloads/msabramo/linux/dtrace4linux%20Ubuntu%2011.10%2032-bit.ova

If folks try these, please let me know your experiences at my username at gmail.com

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msabramo commented Jul 6, 2012

And here is an OVA file with a 32-bit Ubuntu system. I was able to import this into VMware Player on Windows 7, so this may be useful too:

https://github.com/downloads/msabramo/linux/dtrace4linux%20Ubuntu%2011.10%2032-bit.ova

If folks try these, please let me know your experiences at my username at gmail.com

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msabramo Jul 20, 2012

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Has anyone gotten a chance to try this?

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msabramo commented Jul 20, 2012

Has anyone gotten a chance to try this?

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msabramo Jul 25, 2012

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Tweeted this at https://twitter.com/MSAbramo/status/228159665626824704 in an effort to get folks to try it and give feedback.

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msabramo commented Jul 25, 2012

Tweeted this at https://twitter.com/MSAbramo/status/228159665626824704 in an effort to get folks to try it and give feedback.

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johnverber Aug 23, 2012

how to you add vagrant to the path in Ubuntu? I've been trying to find something on this for an hour and 'nada'

how to you add vagrant to the path in Ubuntu? I've been trying to find something on this for an hour and 'nada'

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@johnverber See this page for instructions on installing Vagrant. The preferred method is to use their install packages and they link to a page with .deb files (http://downloads.vagrantup.com/tags/v1.0.3). If that doesn't work, then you can install with gem (Ruby package manager), but they prefer using the installer.

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msabramo commented Aug 30, 2012

@johnverber See this page for instructions on installing Vagrant. The preferred method is to use their install packages and they link to a page with .deb files (http://downloads.vagrantup.com/tags/v1.0.3). If that doesn't work, then you can install with gem (Ruby package manager), but they prefer using the installer.

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johnverber Aug 30, 2012

I realized I needed to change the .bashrc file and add the PATH in there. It's frustrating when the 'white papers' don't explain that to beginners. But as I got that all figured out I realized that I was trying to install vagrant on a Ubuntu system only to run a lucid box through vagrant, which is redundant ... lol. But it was good practice at least. If I get a Mac or wanna run this on my PC I'll be an expert. Perhaps I'll throw some 'beginner' instructions up concerning vagrant on my blog. Ciao!

I realized I needed to change the .bashrc file and add the PATH in there. It's frustrating when the 'white papers' don't explain that to beginners. But as I got that all figured out I realized that I was trying to install vagrant on a Ubuntu system only to run a lucid box through vagrant, which is redundant ... lol. But it was good practice at least. If I get a Mac or wanna run this on my PC I'll be an expert. Perhaps I'll throw some 'beginner' instructions up concerning vagrant on my blog. Ciao!

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Glad you figured it out. I'd say it's not completely redundant though, because the Vagrant VM is completely isolated, so even though it's Ubuntu running inside Ubuntu, it's useful to have a sandbox to mess around with and not risk messing up your main system. Also, the vagrant and puppet stuff that I did automates the set up of DTrace4Linux so instead of doing a bunch of stuff on your main system to build and install the kernel module, a lot of that happens automatically.

At some point, especially if there's demand, I might create vagrant boxes for other Linux distros -- e.g.: Fedora, Gentoo, etc. I think Paul mainly develops on an Ubuntu system so this would be a nice way to test on other distros.

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msabramo commented Aug 30, 2012

Glad you figured it out. I'd say it's not completely redundant though, because the Vagrant VM is completely isolated, so even though it's Ubuntu running inside Ubuntu, it's useful to have a sandbox to mess around with and not risk messing up your main system. Also, the vagrant and puppet stuff that I did automates the set up of DTrace4Linux so instead of doing a bunch of stuff on your main system to build and install the kernel module, a lot of that happens automatically.

At some point, especially if there's demand, I might create vagrant boxes for other Linux distros -- e.g.: Fedora, Gentoo, etc. I think Paul mainly develops on an Ubuntu system so this would be a nice way to test on other distros.

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johnverber Aug 30, 2012

That's a good point. I'm actually setting a up a chef/cookbooks
environment so perhaps I will go ahead and go through with the whole thing.
Thanks for all the pointers. I truly appreciate them....much easier than
scouring the net trying to find an answer on everything forum there is.

On Thu, Aug 30, 2012 at 8:39 AM, Marc Abramowitz
notifications@github.comwrote:

Glad you figured it out. I'd say it's not completely redundant though,
because the Vagrant VM is completely isolated, so even though it's Ubuntu
running inside Ubuntu, it's useful to have a sandbox to mess around with
and not risk messing up your main system. Also, the vagrant and puppet
stuff that I did automates the set up of DTrace4Linux so instead of doing a
bunch of stuff on your main system to build and install the kernel module,
a lot of that happens automatically.

At some point, especially if there's demand, I might create vagrant boxes
for other Linux distros -- e.g.: Fedora, Gentoo, etc. I think Paul mainly
develops on an Ubuntu system so this would be a nice way to test on other
distros.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/dtrace4linux/linux/pull/37#issuecomment-8163580.

*Regards,

John Verber

That's a good point. I'm actually setting a up a chef/cookbooks
environment so perhaps I will go ahead and go through with the whole thing.
Thanks for all the pointers. I truly appreciate them....much easier than
scouring the net trying to find an answer on everything forum there is.

On Thu, Aug 30, 2012 at 8:39 AM, Marc Abramowitz
notifications@github.comwrote:

Glad you figured it out. I'd say it's not completely redundant though,
because the Vagrant VM is completely isolated, so even though it's Ubuntu
running inside Ubuntu, it's useful to have a sandbox to mess around with
and not risk messing up your main system. Also, the vagrant and puppet
stuff that I did automates the set up of DTrace4Linux so instead of doing a
bunch of stuff on your main system to build and install the kernel module,
a lot of that happens automatically.

At some point, especially if there's demand, I might create vagrant boxes
for other Linux distros -- e.g.: Fedora, Gentoo, etc. I think Paul mainly
develops on an Ubuntu system so this would be a nice way to test on other
distros.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/dtrace4linux/linux/pull/37#issuecomment-8163580.

*Regards,

John Verber

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dtrace4linux Aug 30, 2012

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thanks Marc for raising awareness
On Aug 30, 2012 4:21 PM, "Marc Abramowitz" notifications@github.com wrote:

@johnverber https://github.com/johnverber See this pagehttp://vagrantup.com/v1/docs/getting-started/index.htmlfor instructions on installing Vagrant. The preferred method is to use
their install packages and they link to a page with .deb files. If that
doesn't work, then you can install with gem (Ruby package manager), but
they prefer using the installer.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/dtrace4linux/linux/pull/37#issuecomment-8162895.

Owner

dtrace4linux commented Aug 30, 2012

thanks Marc for raising awareness
On Aug 30, 2012 4:21 PM, "Marc Abramowitz" notifications@github.com wrote:

@johnverber https://github.com/johnverber See this pagehttp://vagrantup.com/v1/docs/getting-started/index.htmlfor instructions on installing Vagrant. The preferred method is to use
their install packages and they link to a page with .deb files. If that
doesn't work, then you can install with gem (Ruby package manager), but
they prefer using the installer.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/dtrace4linux/linux/pull/37#issuecomment-8162895.

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msabramo Jan 13, 2015

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Ping

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msabramo commented Jan 13, 2015

Ping

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dtrace4linux Jan 13, 2015

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Hello Marc

what is the question?

On 13 January 2015 at 16:36, Marc Abramowitz notifications@github.com
wrote:

Ping


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dtrace4linux commented Jan 13, 2015

Hello Marc

what is the question?

On 13 January 2015 at 16:36, Marc Abramowitz notifications@github.com
wrote:

Ping


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msabramo Jan 15, 2015

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Oh this PR has been open for a while and I was wondering if you wanted to merge it or if you wanted me to make any changes.

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msabramo commented Jan 15, 2015

Oh this PR has been open for a while and I was wondering if you wanted to merge it or if you wanted me to make any changes.

@msabramo msabramo closed this Feb 26, 2015

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