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A layered LoRa data modem stack for the Raspberry Pi 3. Written in Python3 using the farc hierarchical state machine framework.
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README.md

HeyMac

HeyMac is a flexible frame definition and communication protocol designed to carry Data Link (Layer 2) and Network (Layer 3) frames between modest data rate, small payload radio modems such as the Semtech SX127x. HeyMac is distilled from and incompatible with IEEE 802.15.4.

HeyMac is written in Python 3 using the farc hierarchical state machine framework and is intended to run on a Raspberry Pi 3 running Linux. HeyMac and farc require the asyncio module found in Python 3.4 and later.

This project formerly included its own Physical Layer (Layer 1) radio driver, but that code is now its own submodule.

I am a licensed amateur radio operator in the USA. So I am using frequencies, modulations and antenna gains that are not allowed by unlicensed individuals or persons in other nations. Know your local regulations before duplicating these experiments.

Hardware

During the prototyping stage of development, I'm using a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. The radio board is a Dragino LoRa/GPS Hat that I bought here. They sent me version 1.3 of the PCB eventhough there are later versions. So I had to make a couple fixes and a few additions. The first and most important fix is to connect the radio's SPI Chip Select (CS) signal to the Pi's SPI0 CS0. Without that, you have to programmatically control the radio's CS before and after every transaction (that's a PITA that slows hardware and software). It's better to connect the Pi's CS so the Pi's SPI peripheral (hardware) can control the CS signal automatically. The additions are direct connections from the radio's DIOn pins to the Pi's GPIO and the GPS's Pulse Per Second (PPS) signal to the Pi.

Below is a table of the connections between the Raspberry Pi, the LoRa radio and the GPS. The "Mod" column indicates where I needed to solder a wire to make the connection. If the Mod column is empty that means the connection is made by a trace in the Dragino PCB.

Device Signal pin pin Pi signal Mod
LoRa SPI MISO 10 21 SPI0 MISO
LoRa SPI MOSI 11 19 SPI0 MOSI
LoRa SPI SCLK 12 23 SPI0 SCLK
LoRa SPI SS 13 22 GPIO 25 1
LoRa SPI SS 13 24 SPI0 CS0 W
LoRa DIO0 6 7 GPIO 4
LoRa DIO1 7 16 GPIO 23
LoRa DIO2 8 18 GPIO 24
LoRa DIO3 3 31 GPIO 6 W
LoRa DIO4 4 29 GPIO 5 W
LoRa DIO5 15 15 GPIO 22 W
LoRa RESET 14 11 GPIO 17
GPS RX 1 8 UART TX
GPS TX 2 10 UART RX
GPS PPS 6 37 GPIO 26 W
Mod Explanation
W Added a fly wire
1 Either GPIO25 always remains an unusable input, or cut trace to Pi's pin22.
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