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Dead-simple DNS Server Daemon written in NodeJS
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README.md

dynsdjs

Dead-simple DNS Server Daemon written in NodeJS

Features

  • A fully functional IPv4/IPv6 DNS Server ( test it yourself with dig -4 and dig -6 ) listening on TCP/UDP
  • A full plugin logic to extend the DNS with custom functionality ( see below for more details )

Installation

You can install dynsdjs by simply running:

$ npm install -g dynsdjs
$ dynsd # sudo is required to bind port 80 and 53

Development

$ git clone https://github.com/julianxhokaxhiu/dynsdjs.git
$ cd dynsdjs
$ npm install
$ npm link
$ dynsd # sudo is required to bind port 80 and 53

Options

You can configure dynsdjs through Environment variables

  • DNSPORT for the DNS service ( default is 53 )
  • DNSRESOURCES to define a list of supported resources. Must be a string separated by comma ( default is A,AAAA,NS,CNAME,PTR,NAPTR,TXT,MX,SRV,SOA,TLSA )

DNS Resources

The parameter DNSRESOURCES will help you to either restrict or extend the functionalities of the DNS Server. Either because of security reasons or whatever. This functionality will be a heavy whitelist, when resolving an internal domain present in the list ( injected through the init event ).

So, if you for eg. set DNSRESOURCES='A,AAAA' ( like in the example down here ), this means that even if the plugins will return an extended entry with other resource records ( like MX, NS, etc. ) your DNS will answer only with A and AAAA records.

Example

$ DNSPORT=5353 DNSRESOURCES='A,AAAA' dynsd

See also package.json as a real world example.

Plugins

You can extend this Daemon by creating a package that has a name that starts with dynsdjs-plugin prefix. In order to use it, it's just required to install it globally or in the current working directory, so dynsdjs will be able to auto-detect it.

$ npm install -g dynsdjs-plugin-api

The plugin at this point will be run automatically on the next restart of the daemon

API

In order to create a plugin, what you need is just to have a constructor that accepts as first argument the DNS daemon instance. For eg.:

module.export = function ( dns ) {
    // `dns` is the daemon instance
}

You can use the daemon instance to listen for events that are emitted from it. At the current state there are three known events. An example would be:

module.export = function ( dns ) {
    dns.on( 'init', function ( resolve, reject, data ) {
        console.log( 'Hello world!' );
      	resolve();
    })
}

init ( resolve, reject, data )

The init event is emitted as soon as the DNS daemon starts. The event gives tree arguments:

  • resolve: a promise function that must be called if everything on the plugin side went well.
  • reject: a promise function that must be called if something went wrong.
  • data.entries: this object will hold the current entries present in the daemon. You can extend/manipulate it, as long as you prefer. This object is an instance of node-cache, therefore see its API for more informations.
data.entries structure

The structure of every entry must be Dictionary where:

  • key must be a resource type ( eg. A,AAAA,etc. )
  • value a valid Dictionary, composed of the keys explained in native-dns ResourceRecord documentation

This is an example of valid structure:

{
  "A": {
    "name": "awesomedomain.local",
    "address": "0.0.0.0",
    "ttl": 600
  },
  "AAAA": {
    "name": "awesomedomain.local",
    "address": "::",
    "ttl": 600
  }
}

resolve.internal ( resolve, reject, data )

The resolve.internal event is emitted as soon as the DNS daemon hits an internal entry. The event gives you three arguments. See the next event for more informations.

resolve.external ( resolve, reject, data )

The resolve.external event is emitted as soon as the DNS daemon does not hit an internal entry, and goes therefore through external resolvers. The event gives you three arguments:

  • resolve: a promise function that must be called if everything on the plugin side went well.
  • reject: a promise function that must be called if something went wrong.
  • data.req: an object representing the current request coming from the native-dns server instance.
  • data.res: an object representing the current response object coming from the native-dns server instance.

List of Plugins

A current list of plugins that are available can be found here:

License

See LICENSE

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