Browse files

Documentation: convert SystemLibrary documentation to reST

git-svn-id: https://llvm.org/svn/llvm-project/llvm/trunk@168289 91177308-0d34-0410-b5e6-96231b3b80d8
  • Loading branch information...
1 parent 0aea24d commit 838a73d84768bb22c2e3e0479343def1ea137fbd @gribozavr gribozavr committed Nov 18, 2012
Showing with 258 additions and 318 deletions.
  1. +0 −316 docs/SystemLibrary.html
  2. +255 −0 docs/SystemLibrary.rst
  3. +3 −2 docs/subsystems.rst
View
316 docs/SystemLibrary.html
@@ -1,316 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
- "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
-<html>
-<head>
- <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
- <title>System Library</title>
- <link rel="stylesheet" href="_static/llvm.css" type="text/css">
-</head>
-<body>
-
-<h1>System Library</h1>
-<ul>
- <li><a href="#abstract">Abstract</a></li>
- <li><a href="#requirements">Keeping LLVM Portable</a>
- <ol>
- <li><a href="#headers">Don't Include System Headers</a></li>
- <li><a href="#expose">Don't Expose System Headers</a></li>
- <li><a href="#c_headers">Allow Standard C Header Files</a></li>
- <li><a href="#cpp_headers">Allow Standard C++ Header Files</a></li>
- <li><a href="#highlev">High-Level Interface</a></li>
- <li><a href="#nofunc">No Exposed Functions</a></li>
- <li><a href="#nodata">No Exposed Data</a></li>
- <li><a href="#nodupl">No Duplicate Implementations</a></li>
- <li><a href="#nounused">No Unused Functionality</a></li>
- <li><a href="#virtuals">No Virtual Methods</a></li>
- <li><a href="#softerrors">Minimize Soft Errors</a></li>
- <li><a href="#throw_spec">No throw() Specifications</a></li>
- <li><a href="#organization">Code Organization</a></li>
- <li><a href="#semantics">Consistent Semantics</a></li>
- <li><a href="#bug">Tracking Bugzilla Bug: 351</a></li>
- </ol></li>
-</ul>
-
-<div class="doc_author">
- <p>Written by <a href="mailto:rspencer@x10sys.com">Reid Spencer</a></p>
-</div>
-
-
-<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
-<h2><a name="abstract">Abstract</a></h2>
-<div>
- <p>This document provides some details on LLVM's System Library, located in
- the source at <tt>lib/System</tt> and <tt>include/llvm/System</tt>. The
- library's purpose is to shield LLVM from the differences between operating
- systems for the few services LLVM needs from the operating system. Much of
- LLVM is written using portability features of standard C++. However, in a few
- areas, system dependent facilities are needed and the System Library is the
- wrapper around those system calls.</p>
- <p>By centralizing LLVM's use of operating system interfaces, we make it
- possible for the LLVM tool chain and runtime libraries to be more easily
- ported to new platforms since (theoretically) only <tt>lib/System</tt> needs
- to be ported. This library also unclutters the rest of LLVM from #ifdef use
- and special cases for specific operating systems. Such uses are replaced
- with simple calls to the interfaces provided in <tt>include/llvm/System</tt>.
- </p>
- <p>Note that the System Library is not intended to be a complete operating
- system wrapper (such as the Adaptive Communications Environment (ACE) or
- Apache Portable Runtime (APR)), but only provides the functionality necessary
- to support LLVM.
- <p>The System Library was written by Reid Spencer who formulated the
- design based on similar work originating from the eXtensible Programming
- System (XPS). Several people helped with the effort; especially,
- Jeff Cohen and Henrik Bach on the Win32 port.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
-<h2>
- <a name="requirements">Keeping LLVM Portable</a>
-</h2>
-<div>
- <p>In order to keep LLVM portable, LLVM developers should adhere to a set of
- portability rules associated with the System Library. Adherence to these rules
- should help the System Library achieve its goal of shielding LLVM from the
- variations in operating system interfaces and doing so efficiently. The
- following sections define the rules needed to fulfill this objective.</p>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="headers">Don't Include System Headers</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>Except in <tt>lib/System</tt>, no LLVM source code should directly
- <tt>#include</tt> a system header. Care has been taken to remove all such
- <tt>#includes</tt> from LLVM while <tt>lib/System</tt> was being
- developed. Specifically this means that header files like "unistd.h",
- "windows.h", "stdio.h", and "string.h" are forbidden to be included by LLVM
- source code outside the implementation of <tt>lib/System</tt>.</p>
- <p>To obtain system-dependent functionality, existing interfaces to the system
- found in <tt>include/llvm/System</tt> should be used. If an appropriate
- interface is not available, it should be added to <tt>include/llvm/System</tt>
- and implemented in <tt>lib/System</tt> for all supported platforms.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="expose">Don't Expose System Headers</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>The System Library must shield LLVM from <em>all</em> system headers. To
- obtain system level functionality, LLVM source must
- <tt>#include "llvm/System/Thing.h"</tt> and nothing else. This means that
- <tt>Thing.h</tt> cannot expose any system header files. This protects LLVM
- from accidentally using system specific functionality and only allows it
- via the <tt>lib/System</tt> interface.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="c_headers">Use Standard C Headers</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>The <em>standard</em> C headers (the ones beginning with "c") are allowed
- to be exposed through the <tt>lib/System</tt> interface. These headers and
- the things they declare are considered to be platform agnostic. LLVM source
- files may include them directly or obtain their inclusion through
- <tt>lib/System</tt> interfaces.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="cpp_headers">Use Standard C++ Headers</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>The <em>standard</em> C++ headers from the standard C++ library and
- standard template library may be exposed through the <tt>lib/System</tt>
- interface. These headers and the things they declare are considered to be
- platform agnostic. LLVM source files may include them or obtain their
- inclusion through lib/System interfaces.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="highlev">High Level Interface</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>The entry points specified in the interface of lib/System must be aimed at
- completing some reasonably high level task needed by LLVM. We do not want to
- simply wrap each operating system call. It would be preferable to wrap several
- operating system calls that are always used in conjunction with one another by
- LLVM.</p>
- <p>For example, consider what is needed to execute a program, wait for it to
- complete, and return its result code. On Unix, this involves the following
- operating system calls: <tt>getenv, fork, execve,</tt> and <tt>wait</tt>. The
- correct thing for lib/System to provide is a function, say
- <tt>ExecuteProgramAndWait</tt>, that implements the functionality completely.
- what we don't want is wrappers for the operating system calls involved.</p>
- <p>There must <em>not</em> be a one-to-one relationship between operating
- system calls and the System library's interface. Any such interface function
- will be suspicious.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="nounused">No Unused Functionality</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>There must be no functionality specified in the interface of lib/System
- that isn't actually used by LLVM. We're not writing a general purpose
- operating system wrapper here, just enough to satisfy LLVM's needs. And, LLVM
- doesn't need much. This design goal aims to keep the lib/System interface
- small and understandable which should foster its actual use and adoption.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="nodupl">No Duplicate Implementations</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>The implementation of a function for a given platform must be written
- exactly once. This implies that it must be possible to apply a function's
- implementation to multiple operating systems if those operating systems can
- share the same implementation. This rule applies to the set of operating
- systems supported for a given class of operating system (e.g. Unix, Win32).
- </p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="virtuals">No Virtual Methods</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>The System Library interfaces can be called quite frequently by LLVM. In
- order to make those calls as efficient as possible, we discourage the use of
- virtual methods. There is no need to use inheritance for implementation
- differences, it just adds complexity. The <tt>#include</tt> mechanism works
- just fine.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="nofunc">No Exposed Functions</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>Any functions defined by system libraries (i.e. not defined by lib/System)
- must not be exposed through the lib/System interface, even if the header file
- for that function is not exposed. This prevents inadvertent use of system
- specific functionality.</p>
- <p>For example, the <tt>stat</tt> system call is notorious for having
- variations in the data it provides. <tt>lib/System</tt> must not declare
- <tt>stat</tt> nor allow it to be declared. Instead it should provide its own
- interface to discovering information about files and directories. Those
- interfaces may be implemented in terms of <tt>stat</tt> but that is strictly
- an implementation detail. The interface provided by the System Library must
- be implemented on all platforms (even those without <tt>stat</tt>).</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="nodata">No Exposed Data</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>Any data defined by system libraries (i.e. not defined by lib/System) must
- not be exposed through the lib/System interface, even if the header file for
- that function is not exposed. As with functions, this prevents inadvertent use
- of data that might not exist on all platforms.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="softerrors">Minimize Soft Errors</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>Operating system interfaces will generally provide error results for every
- little thing that could go wrong. In almost all cases, you can divide these
- error results into two groups: normal/good/soft and abnormal/bad/hard. That
- is, some of the errors are simply information like "file not found",
- "insufficient privileges", etc. while other errors are much harder like
- "out of space", "bad disk sector", or "system call interrupted". We'll call
- the first group "<i>soft</i>" errors and the second group "<i>hard</i>"
- errors.<p>
- <p>lib/System must always attempt to minimize soft errors.
- This is a design requirement because the
- minimization of soft errors can affect the granularity and the nature of the
- interface. In general, if you find that you're wanting to throw soft errors,
- you must review the granularity of the interface because it is likely you're
- trying to implement something that is too low level. The rule of thumb is to
- provide interface functions that <em>can't</em> fail, except when faced with
- hard errors.</p>
- <p>For a trivial example, suppose we wanted to add an "OpenFileForWriting"
- function. For many operating systems, if the file doesn't exist, attempting
- to open the file will produce an error. However, lib/System should not
- simply throw that error if it occurs because its a soft error. The problem
- is that the interface function, OpenFileForWriting is too low level. It should
- be OpenOrCreateFileForWriting. In the case of the soft "doesn't exist" error,
- this function would just create it and then open it for writing.</p>
- <p>This design principle needs to be maintained in lib/System because it
- avoids the propagation of soft error handling throughout the rest of LLVM.
- Hard errors will generally just cause a termination for an LLVM tool so don't
- be bashful about throwing them.</p>
- <p>Rules of thumb:</p>
- <ol>
- <li>Don't throw soft errors, only hard errors.</li>
- <li>If you're tempted to throw a soft error, re-think the interface.</li>
- <li>Handle internally the most common normal/good/soft error conditions
- so the rest of LLVM doesn't have to.</li>
- </ol>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="throw_spec">No throw Specifications</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>None of the lib/System interface functions may be declared with C++
- <tt>throw()</tt> specifications on them. This requirement makes sure that the
- compiler does not insert additional exception handling code into the interface
- functions. This is a performance consideration: lib/System functions are at
- the bottom of many call chains and as such can be frequently called. We
- need them to be as efficient as possible. However, no routines in the
- system library should actually throw exceptions.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="organization">Code Organization</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>Implementations of the System Library interface are separated by their
- general class of operating system. Currently only Unix and Win32 classes are
- defined but more could be added for other operating system classifications.
- To distinguish which implementation to compile, the code in lib/System uses
- the LLVM_ON_UNIX and LLVM_ON_WIN32 #defines provided via configure through the
- llvm/Config/config.h file. Each source file in lib/System, after implementing
- the generic (operating system independent) functionality needs to include the
- correct implementation using a set of <tt>#if defined(LLVM_ON_XYZ)</tt>
- directives. For example, if we had lib/System/File.cpp, we'd expect to see in
- that file:</p>
- <pre><tt>
- #if defined(LLVM_ON_UNIX)
- #include "Unix/File.cpp"
- #endif
- #if defined(LLVM_ON_WIN32)
- #include "Win32/File.cpp"
- #endif
- </tt></pre>
- <p>The implementation in lib/System/Unix/File.cpp should handle all Unix
- variants. The implementation in lib/System/Win32/File.cpp should handle all
- Win32 variants. What this does is quickly differentiate the basic class of
- operating system that will provide the implementation. The specific details
- for a given platform must still be determined through the use of
- <tt>#ifdef</tt>.</p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="semantics">Consistent Semantics</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>The implementation of a lib/System interface can vary drastically between
- platforms. That's okay as long as the end result of the interface function
- is the same. For example, a function to create a directory is pretty straight
- forward on all operating system. System V IPC on the other hand isn't even
- supported on all platforms. Instead of "supporting" System V IPC, lib/System
- should provide an interface to the basic concept of inter-process
- communications. The implementations might use System V IPC if that was
- available or named pipes, or whatever gets the job done effectively for a
- given operating system. In all cases, the interface and the implementation
- must be semantically consistent. </p>
-</div>
-
-<!-- ======================================================================= -->
-<h3><a name="bug">Bug 351</a></h3>
-<div>
- <p>See <a href="http://llvm.org/PR351">bug 351</a>
- for further details on the progress of this work</p>
-</div>
-
-</div>
-
-<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
-
-<hr>
-<address>
- <a href="http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/check/referer"><img
- src="http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/images/vcss-blue" alt="Valid CSS"></a>
- <a href="http://validator.w3.org/check/referer"><img
- src="http://www.w3.org/Icons/valid-html401-blue" alt="Valid HTML 4.01"></a>
-
- <a href="mailto:rspencer@x10sys.com">Reid Spencer</a><br>
- <a href="http://llvm.org/">LLVM Compiler Infrastructure</a><br>
- Last modified: $Date$
-</address>
-</body>
-</html>
View
255 docs/SystemLibrary.rst
@@ -0,0 +1,255 @@
+==============
+System Library
+==============
+
+.. sectionauthor:: Reid Spencer <rspencer@x10sys.com>
+
+Abstract
+========
+
+
+This document provides some details on LLVM's System Library, located in the
+source at ``lib/System`` and ``include/llvm/System``. The library's purpose is
+to shield LLVM from the differences between operating systems for the few
+services LLVM needs from the operating system. Much of LLVM is written using
+portability features of standard C++. However, in a few areas, system dependent
+facilities are needed and the System Library is the wrapper around those system
+calls.
+
+By centralizing LLVM's use of operating system interfaces, we make it possible
+for the LLVM tool chain and runtime libraries to be more easily ported to new
+platforms since (theoretically) only ``lib/System`` needs to be ported. This
+library also unclutters the rest of LLVM from #ifdef use and special cases for
+specific operating systems. Such uses are replaced with simple calls to the
+interfaces provided in ``include/llvm/System``.
+
+Note that the System Library is not intended to be a complete operating system
+wrapper (such as the Adaptive Communications Environment (ACE) or Apache
+Portable Runtime (APR)), but only provides the functionality necessary to
+support LLVM.
+
+The System Library was written by Reid Spencer who formulated the design based
+on similar work originating from the eXtensible Programming System (XPS).
+Several people helped with the effort; especially, Jeff Cohen and Henrik Bach
+on the Win32 port.
+
+Keeping LLVM Portable
+=====================
+
+In order to keep LLVM portable, LLVM developers should adhere to a set of
+portability rules associated with the System Library. Adherence to these rules
+should help the System Library achieve its goal of shielding LLVM from the
+variations in operating system interfaces and doing so efficiently. The
+following sections define the rules needed to fulfill this objective.
+
+Don't Include System Headers
+----------------------------
+
+Except in ``lib/System``, no LLVM source code should directly ``#include`` a
+system header. Care has been taken to remove all such ``#includes`` from LLVM
+while ``lib/System`` was being developed. Specifically this means that header
+files like "``unistd.h``", "``windows.h``", "``stdio.h``", and "``string.h``"
+are forbidden to be included by LLVM source code outside the implementation of
+``lib/System``.
+
+To obtain system-dependent functionality, existing interfaces to the system
+found in ``include/llvm/System`` should be used. If an appropriate interface is
+not available, it should be added to ``include/llvm/System`` and implemented in
+``lib/System`` for all supported platforms.
+
+Don't Expose System Headers
+---------------------------
+
+The System Library must shield LLVM from **all** system headers. To obtain
+system level functionality, LLVM source must ``#include "llvm/System/Thing.h"``
+and nothing else. This means that ``Thing.h`` cannot expose any system header
+files. This protects LLVM from accidentally using system specific functionality
+and only allows it via the ``lib/System`` interface.
+
+Use Standard C Headers
+----------------------
+
+The **standard** C headers (the ones beginning with "c") are allowed to be
+exposed through the ``lib/System`` interface. These headers and the things they
+declare are considered to be platform agnostic. LLVM source files may include
+them directly or obtain their inclusion through ``lib/System`` interfaces.
+
+Use Standard C++ Headers
+------------------------
+
+The **standard** C++ headers from the standard C++ library and standard
+template library may be exposed through the ``lib/System`` interface. These
+headers and the things they declare are considered to be platform agnostic.
+LLVM source files may include them or obtain their inclusion through
+``lib/System`` interfaces.
+
+High Level Interface
+--------------------
+
+The entry points specified in the interface of ``lib/System`` must be aimed at
+completing some reasonably high level task needed by LLVM. We do not want to
+simply wrap each operating system call. It would be preferable to wrap several
+operating system calls that are always used in conjunction with one another by
+LLVM.
+
+For example, consider what is needed to execute a program, wait for it to
+complete, and return its result code. On Unix, this involves the following
+operating system calls: ``getenv``, ``fork``, ``execve``, and ``wait``. The
+correct thing for ``lib/System`` to provide is a function, say
+``ExecuteProgramAndWait``, that implements the functionality completely. what
+we don't want is wrappers for the operating system calls involved.
+
+There must **not** be a one-to-one relationship between operating system
+calls and the System library's interface. Any such interface function will be
+suspicious.
+
+No Unused Functionality
+-----------------------
+
+There must be no functionality specified in the interface of ``lib/System``
+that isn't actually used by LLVM. We're not writing a general purpose operating
+system wrapper here, just enough to satisfy LLVM's needs. And, LLVM doesn't
+need much. This design goal aims to keep the ``lib/System`` interface small and
+understandable which should foster its actual use and adoption.
+
+No Duplicate Implementations
+----------------------------
+
+The implementation of a function for a given platform must be written exactly
+once. This implies that it must be possible to apply a function's
+implementation to multiple operating systems if those operating systems can
+share the same implementation. This rule applies to the set of operating
+systems supported for a given class of operating system (e.g. Unix, Win32).
+
+No Virtual Methods
+------------------
+
+The System Library interfaces can be called quite frequently by LLVM. In order
+to make those calls as efficient as possible, we discourage the use of virtual
+methods. There is no need to use inheritance for implementation differences, it
+just adds complexity. The ``#include`` mechanism works just fine.
+
+No Exposed Functions
+--------------------
+
+Any functions defined by system libraries (i.e. not defined by ``lib/System``)
+must not be exposed through the ``lib/System`` interface, even if the header
+file for that function is not exposed. This prevents inadvertent use of system
+specific functionality.
+
+For example, the ``stat`` system call is notorious for having variations in the
+data it provides. ``lib/System`` must not declare ``stat`` nor allow it to be
+declared. Instead it should provide its own interface to discovering
+information about files and directories. Those interfaces may be implemented in
+terms of ``stat`` but that is strictly an implementation detail. The interface
+provided by the System Library must be implemented on all platforms (even those
+without ``stat``).
+
+No Exposed Data
+---------------
+
+Any data defined by system libraries (i.e. not defined by ``lib/System``) must
+not be exposed through the ``lib/System`` interface, even if the header file
+for that function is not exposed. As with functions, this prevents inadvertent
+use of data that might not exist on all platforms.
+
+Minimize Soft Errors
+--------------------
+
+Operating system interfaces will generally provide error results for every
+little thing that could go wrong. In almost all cases, you can divide these
+error results into two groups: normal/good/soft and abnormal/bad/hard. That is,
+some of the errors are simply information like "file not found", "insufficient
+privileges", etc. while other errors are much harder like "out of space", "bad
+disk sector", or "system call interrupted". We'll call the first group "*soft*"
+errors and the second group "*hard*" errors.
+
+``lib/System`` must always attempt to minimize soft errors. This is a design
+requirement because the minimization of soft errors can affect the granularity
+and the nature of the interface. In general, if you find that you're wanting to
+throw soft errors, you must review the granularity of the interface because it
+is likely you're trying to implement something that is too low level. The rule
+of thumb is to provide interface functions that **can't** fail, except when
+faced with hard errors.
+
+For a trivial example, suppose we wanted to add an "``OpenFileForWriting``"
+function. For many operating systems, if the file doesn't exist, attempting to
+open the file will produce an error. However, ``lib/System`` should not simply
+throw that error if it occurs because its a soft error. The problem is that the
+interface function, ``OpenFileForWriting`` is too low level. It should be
+``OpenOrCreateFileForWriting``. In the case of the soft "doesn't exist" error,
+this function would just create it and then open it for writing.
+
+This design principle needs to be maintained in ``lib/System`` because it
+avoids the propagation of soft error handling throughout the rest of LLVM.
+Hard errors will generally just cause a termination for an LLVM tool so don't
+be bashful about throwing them.
+
+Rules of thumb:
+
+#. Don't throw soft errors, only hard errors.
+
+#. If you're tempted to throw a soft error, re-think the interface.
+
+#. Handle internally the most common normal/good/soft error conditions
+ so the rest of LLVM doesn't have to.
+
+No throw Specifications
+-----------------------
+
+None of the ``lib/System`` interface functions may be declared with C++
+``throw()`` specifications on them. This requirement makes sure that the
+compiler does not insert additional exception handling code into the interface
+functions. This is a performance consideration: ``lib/System`` functions are at
+the bottom of many call chains and as such can be frequently called. We need
+them to be as efficient as possible. However, no routines in the system
+library should actually throw exceptions.
+
+Code Organization
+-----------------
+
+Implementations of the System Library interface are separated by their general
+class of operating system. Currently only Unix and Win32 classes are defined
+but more could be added for other operating system classifications. To
+distinguish which implementation to compile, the code in ``lib/System`` uses
+the ``LLVM_ON_UNIX`` and ``LLVM_ON_WIN32`` ``#defines`` provided via configure
+through the ``llvm/Config/config.h`` file. Each source file in ``lib/System``,
+after implementing the generic (operating system independent) functionality
+needs to include the correct implementation using a set of
+``#if defined(LLVM_ON_XYZ)`` directives. For example, if we had
+``lib/System/File.cpp``, we'd expect to see in that file:
+
+.. code-block:: c++
+
+ #if defined(LLVM_ON_UNIX)
+ #include "Unix/File.cpp"
+ #endif
+ #if defined(LLVM_ON_WIN32)
+ #include "Win32/File.cpp"
+ #endif
+
+The implementation in ``lib/System/Unix/File.cpp`` should handle all Unix
+variants. The implementation in ``lib/System/Win32/File.cpp`` should handle all
+Win32 variants. What this does is quickly differentiate the basic class of
+operating system that will provide the implementation. The specific details for
+a given platform must still be determined through the use of ``#ifdef``.
+
+Consistent Semantics
+--------------------
+
+The implementation of a ``lib/System`` interface can vary drastically between
+platforms. That's okay as long as the end result of the interface function is
+the same. For example, a function to create a directory is pretty straight
+forward on all operating system. System V IPC on the other hand isn't even
+supported on all platforms. Instead of "supporting" System V IPC,
+``lib/System`` should provide an interface to the basic concept of
+inter-process communications. The implementations might use System V IPC if
+that was available or named pipes, or whatever gets the job done effectively
+for a given operating system. In all cases, the interface and the
+implementation must be semantically consistent.
+
+Bug 351
+-------
+See `bug 351 <http://llvm.org/PR351>`_ for further details on the progress of
+this work.
+
View
5 docs/subsystems.rst
@@ -19,6 +19,7 @@ Subsystem Documentation
GoldPlugin
MarkedUpDisassembly
HowToUseInstrMappings
+ SystemLibrary
.. FIXME: once LangRef is Sphinxified, HowToUseInstrMappings should be put
under LangRef's toctree instead of this page's toctree.
@@ -71,9 +72,9 @@ Subsystem Documentation
This describes the file format and encoding used for LLVM "bc" files.
-* `System Library <SystemLibrary.html>`_
+* :doc:`System Library <SystemLibrary>`
- This document describes the LLVM System Library (<tt>lib/System</tt>) and
+ This document describes the LLVM System Library (``lib/System``) and
how to keep LLVM source code portable
* :ref:`lto`

0 comments on commit 838a73d

Please sign in to comment.