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M: Removed due to DMCA takedown request

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ryanbr committed Aug 9, 2017
1 parent f9c2d9e commit a4d380ad1a3b33a0fab679a1a8c5a791321622b3
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  1. +0 −1 easylist/easylist_adservers.txt
@@ -4875,7 +4875,6 @@
||fanaticalfly.com^$third-party
||flavordecision.com^$third-party
||foamybox.com^$third-party
||functionalclam.com^$third-party
||ga87z2o.com^$third-party
||illustriousoatmeal.com^$third-party
||inatye.com^$third-party

147 comments on commit a4d380a

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gorhill Aug 11, 2017

There are forces out there working to turn user agents into private interests agents -- i.e. to turn browsers into proprietary devices. This is a manifestation of this.

gorhill replied Aug 11, 2017

There are forces out there working to turn user agents into private interests agents -- i.e. to turn browsers into proprietary devices. This is a manifestation of this.

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bakman2 Aug 11, 2017

A text file with domain-names, how can this be a valid DMCA request ?

bakman2 replied Aug 11, 2017

A text file with domain-names, how can this be a valid DMCA request ?

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zb3 Aug 11, 2017

This repo needs to be forked. Maybe Streisand effect will help.

zb3 replied Aug 11, 2017

This repo needs to be forked. Maybe Streisand effect will help.

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jspenguin2017 Aug 11, 2017

Oh well, time to set up my GitLab server.

jspenguin2017 replied Aug 11, 2017

Oh well, time to set up my GitLab server.

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pgl Aug 11, 2017

@lol768 There is a fairly good list in this Hacker News article.

I've added them all to my list (except for the ones noted below as not currently in use.)

They are here for reference: https://pgl.yoyo.org/adservers/admiral-domains.txt

pgl replied Aug 11, 2017

@lol768 There is a fairly good list in this Hacker News article.

I've added them all to my list (except for the ones noted below as not currently in use.)

They are here for reference: https://pgl.yoyo.org/adservers/admiral-domains.txt

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a-raccoon Aug 11, 2017

Seems to me we just received a DMCA letter to alter our Firewall Rules. Next up: Malware sites issuing DMCA letters to Anti-virus and Web-protect sites (like Google) to have their domains removed from firewall blocking. (Firewall is generic term for like-technologies)

I don't care who these guys are or who's paying for their product; I don't want my computers connecting to their servers, and I don't want to become their product.

We have to make this news go full Streisand Effect!

a-raccoon replied Aug 11, 2017

Seems to me we just received a DMCA letter to alter our Firewall Rules. Next up: Malware sites issuing DMCA letters to Anti-virus and Web-protect sites (like Google) to have their domains removed from firewall blocking. (Firewall is generic term for like-technologies)

I don't care who these guys are or who's paying for their product; I don't want my computers connecting to their servers, and I don't want to become their product.

We have to make this news go full Streisand Effect!

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7Pass Aug 11, 2017

So any ad serving company can now setup DRM business, which serves exactly one customer: their site, can then exclude them from block lists using DMCA? That's convenient.

@pgl Thanks for the domain list. Quick and simple fix.

7Pass replied Aug 11, 2017

So any ad serving company can now setup DRM business, which serves exactly one customer: their site, can then exclude them from block lists using DMCA? That's convenient.

@pgl Thanks for the domain list. Quick and simple fix.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

+zb3 That would be a horrible idea, as it would fragment the efforts of this.
I would say to watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZwLbZ5boZ4 (deals with another frautulent DMCA complaint)

+a-raccoon Next thing, a porn site DMCAs OpenDNS because their web filter circumvents their ability to be accessed by OpenDNS web filter consumers?

This "functionalclam" service is not an effective access control, if circumventing it is as easy as blocking the entire website. If this were to go to court, EasyList would prevail hands down.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

+zb3 That would be a horrible idea, as it would fragment the efforts of this.
I would say to watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZwLbZ5boZ4 (deals with another frautulent DMCA complaint)

+a-raccoon Next thing, a porn site DMCAs OpenDNS because their web filter circumvents their ability to be accessed by OpenDNS web filter consumers?

This "functionalclam" service is not an effective access control, if circumventing it is as easy as blocking the entire website. If this were to go to court, EasyList would prevail hands down.

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miguelmota Aug 11, 2017

What if we hash all the domains in the list? AdBlock clients can then just compare the hash. Does DMCA still apply?

miguelmota replied Aug 11, 2017

What if we hash all the domains in the list? AdBlock clients can then just compare the hash. Does DMCA still apply?

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pgl Aug 11, 2017

@7Pass Feel free to use the rest of my list as well. :)

pgl replied Aug 11, 2017

@7Pass Feel free to use the rest of my list as well. :)

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aknooh Aug 11, 2017

@miguelmota hashing the names would not serve anything for such DMCA request, and it would make the repo very hard to maintain.

aknooh replied Aug 11, 2017

@miguelmota hashing the names would not serve anything for such DMCA request, and it would make the repo very hard to maintain.

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a-raccoon Aug 11, 2017

Can we get a representative from GitHub, Inc. to comment here?

a-raccoon replied Aug 11, 2017

Can we get a representative from GitHub, Inc. to comment here?

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@miguelmota DMCA should not apply even in this situation as the line in the blacklist is nothing more than blocking a whole website. You can sinkhole it in your HOSTS file just as easily.
I actually submitted the domain to MysteryFCM at hosts-file.net (not sure if he is willing to add it because while he is in the UK hpHosts is owned by Malwarebytes which I believe is US-based).

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@miguelmota DMCA should not apply even in this situation as the line in the blacklist is nothing more than blocking a whole website. You can sinkhole it in your HOSTS file just as easily.
I actually submitted the domain to MysteryFCM at hosts-file.net (not sure if he is willing to add it because while he is in the UK hpHosts is owned by Malwarebytes which I believe is US-based).

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7Pass Aug 11, 2017

I would suggest a new feature in Adblockers which instead of blocking ads, it block sites that use a specific ad server. In this case, any site that send requests to functionalclam will be blocked and replaced with a blank page and text to explain that the page was blocked.

This way, we do not need to worry about DMCA because there's no DRM if the whole page is blocked. We would then punish their customer instead of the ad services.

7Pass replied Aug 11, 2017

I would suggest a new feature in Adblockers which instead of blocking ads, it block sites that use a specific ad server. In this case, any site that send requests to functionalclam will be blocked and replaced with a blank page and text to explain that the page was blocked.

This way, we do not need to worry about DMCA because there's no DRM if the whole page is blocked. We would then punish their customer instead of the ad services.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@7Pass This could be doable if the adblockers were to add a new API to block the entire webpage if it has a banned match in it. However, it cannot effectively block the page as the browser still needs to load the page in order for the adblock filter to take effect, unlike how the existing lists prevent requests from even being issued by the browser.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@7Pass This could be doable if the adblockers were to add a new API to block the entire webpage if it has a banned match in it. However, it cannot effectively block the page as the browser still needs to load the page in order for the adblock filter to take effect, unlike how the existing lists prevent requests from even being issued by the browser.

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Beaving Aug 11, 2017

Unbelievable. If users can access copyrighted works simply by blocking a connection, their customers should really think why they even hired them. Sad that you did not counter DMCA immediately. EFF would surely be interested to help. Usually after a counter DMCA you won't hear anything from them anymore, I don't think they would escalate this any further to a lawsuit. Lets just hope everyone will soon block their site by default.

Beaving replied Aug 11, 2017

Unbelievable. If users can access copyrighted works simply by blocking a connection, their customers should really think why they even hired them. Sad that you did not counter DMCA immediately. EFF would surely be interested to help. Usually after a counter DMCA you won't hear anything from them anymore, I don't think they would escalate this any further to a lawsuit. Lets just hope everyone will soon block their site by default.

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daumiller Aug 11, 2017

The takedown request has finally appeared on GitHub's DMCA repo. https://github.com/github/dmca/blob/master/2017/2017-08-02-LevenLabs.md

daumiller replied Aug 11, 2017

The takedown request has finally appeared on GitHub's DMCA repo. https://github.com/github/dmca/blob/master/2017/2017-08-02-LevenLabs.md

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

Does HOSTS work on IP addresses like that on all platforms?
And if Leven Labs were to DMCA the reply by @Skaendoit would be yet another offense of perjury.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

Does HOSTS work on IP addresses like that on all platforms?
And if Leven Labs were to DMCA the reply by @Skaendoit would be yet another offense of perjury.

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roadhazard Aug 11, 2017

I heard about this from another site and registered a Github account just to say this. Is the following possible; get a list of every. single. site. that uses BlockAdBlock and blacklist those sites completely! I KIND OF see their point about bypassing paywalls to get to protected content. But, if the entire site is blocked, not just the paywall roadblock, what could they cry about then? That's what I do now, if I visit a site that tells me to remove AdBlockPlus before I can see their content, I simple close the tab and don't bother going back there. As far as I'm concerned, no loss on my part. As others have said, this is a test case and if it stands, it will open the gates for others to abuse the DMCA process and Easylist will become useless as will uBo and all the others. Might be time to host Adblock and/or Easylist in a country that is beyond DMCA, if such a country exists. Maybe Turkey? North Korea?

roadhazard replied Aug 11, 2017

I heard about this from another site and registered a Github account just to say this. Is the following possible; get a list of every. single. site. that uses BlockAdBlock and blacklist those sites completely! I KIND OF see their point about bypassing paywalls to get to protected content. But, if the entire site is blocked, not just the paywall roadblock, what could they cry about then? That's what I do now, if I visit a site that tells me to remove AdBlockPlus before I can see their content, I simple close the tab and don't bother going back there. As far as I'm concerned, no loss on my part. As others have said, this is a test case and if it stands, it will open the gates for others to abuse the DMCA process and Easylist will become useless as will uBo and all the others. Might be time to host Adblock and/or Easylist in a country that is beyond DMCA, if such a country exists. Maybe Turkey? North Korea?

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@roadhazard The removed line does just that, blocks an entire website. What Leven Labs is demanding is to prevent end users from blocking access to their sites.
Placing the list outside the USA would not prevent liability from US based complainants, as is the case here.
Also North Korea is a completely Bad Idea™ as I am 99% sure the lists contain or reference content strictly banned by their government and they don't have enough IP addresses to host anything other than government propaganda.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@roadhazard The removed line does just that, blocks an entire website. What Leven Labs is demanding is to prevent end users from blocking access to their sites.
Placing the list outside the USA would not prevent liability from US based complainants, as is the case here.
Also North Korea is a completely Bad Idea™ as I am 99% sure the lists contain or reference content strictly banned by their government and they don't have enough IP addresses to host anything other than government propaganda.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@skaendo The file in Windows is %WINDIR%\System32\drivers\etc\hosts
On 64-bit systems, that directory needs to be accessed from a 64-bit view, for example opening the 64-bit version of Command Prompt and not the version in SYSWOW64.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@skaendo The file in Windows is %WINDIR%\System32\drivers\etc\hosts
On 64-bit systems, that directory needs to be accessed from a 64-bit view, for example opening the 64-bit version of Command Prompt and not the version in SYSWOW64.

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roadhazard Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely Oh, OK. Now I understand better. WOW, this makes things 10,000 worse. What in the actual F!??!

roadhazard replied Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely Oh, OK. Now I understand better. WOW, this makes things 10,000 worse. What in the actual F!??!

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roadhazard Aug 11, 2017

Crazy question, what feeds into Easylist? How hard would it be for me to stand up my own Easylist server at my house and just point all my PCs to it? How much effort to stay on top of it and keep it updated?

roadhazard replied Aug 11, 2017

Crazy question, what feeds into Easylist? How hard would it be for me to stand up my own Easylist server at my house and just point all my PCs to it? How much effort to stay on top of it and keep it updated?

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jspenguin2017 Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely HOSTS file is a guide, browsers do not have to check it. You should just add the filter to your ad blocker yourself, easy and reliable.
https://superuser.com/questions/723703/why-is-chromium-bypassing-etc-hosts-and-dnsmasq

@roadhazard Not hard to get it up and running, but keep things in sync can be tricky.

jspenguin2017 replied Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely HOSTS file is a guide, browsers do not have to check it. You should just add the filter to your ad blocker yourself, easy and reliable.
https://superuser.com/questions/723703/why-is-chromium-bypassing-etc-hosts-and-dnsmasq

@roadhazard Not hard to get it up and running, but keep things in sync can be tricky.

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jspenguin2017 Aug 11, 2017

@skaendo I recommend setting up a private GitLab server, the installation is pretty automated, pretty easy to use, though I'm not sure how to keep things in sync.

image

jspenguin2017 replied Aug 11, 2017

@skaendo I recommend setting up a private GitLab server, the installation is pretty automated, pretty easy to use, though I'm not sure how to keep things in sync.

image

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a-raccoon Aug 11, 2017

Maybe a clever solution... Feature suggestion for ad blockers using EasyList:

  1. Domains added to EasyList will be actuated in the ad blocker.
  2. Domains removed from EasyList will not automatically remove them from actuation in the ad blocker.
  3. In order to deactivate a domain from the ad blocker, a specific "REMOVE " command must appear in EasyList.

Since the DMCA only requires that EasyList take the domain off of its list, but cannot compel EasyList to assert a "remove command", the domain is never actually removed from existing ad blocker deployments. Think of it in the same reversed terms as how a 'warrant canary' works. Figure out what minimum effort EasyList is compelled to do under law, and see to it those actions alone don't really change much of anything.

ALSO, investigate what Google does when it removes a site from its search results due to DMCA takedown request. Google maintains a public list of all the URIs (domains included) of each takedown request. I recommend introducing a EasyList-DMCA-Removals parallel list.

a-raccoon replied Aug 11, 2017

Maybe a clever solution... Feature suggestion for ad blockers using EasyList:

  1. Domains added to EasyList will be actuated in the ad blocker.
  2. Domains removed from EasyList will not automatically remove them from actuation in the ad blocker.
  3. In order to deactivate a domain from the ad blocker, a specific "REMOVE " command must appear in EasyList.

Since the DMCA only requires that EasyList take the domain off of its list, but cannot compel EasyList to assert a "remove command", the domain is never actually removed from existing ad blocker deployments. Think of it in the same reversed terms as how a 'warrant canary' works. Figure out what minimum effort EasyList is compelled to do under law, and see to it those actions alone don't really change much of anything.

ALSO, investigate what Google does when it removes a site from its search results due to DMCA takedown request. Google maintains a public list of all the URIs (domains included) of each takedown request. I recommend introducing a EasyList-DMCA-Removals parallel list.

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uda Aug 11, 2017

Either it is something I don't get about DMCA or this request is abusing the DMCA for something that clearly isn't in breach.
Admiral CEO's post makes a point that by putting the domains on the list and blocking their content, it is possible to circumventing some access controls, from what I know as a developer, you gotta be a really bad developer to allow access by simply having some JavaScript blocked.
So from where I stand, it would seem that Admiral's developers are the ones who created back-doors to their customer's content and not this list, and Dan Rua is simply looking for a scapegoat to come out well in the eyes of those customers.

uda replied Aug 11, 2017

Either it is something I don't get about DMCA or this request is abusing the DMCA for something that clearly isn't in breach.
Admiral CEO's post makes a point that by putting the domains on the list and blocking their content, it is possible to circumventing some access controls, from what I know as a developer, you gotta be a really bad developer to allow access by simply having some JavaScript blocked.
So from where I stand, it would seem that Admiral's developers are the ones who created back-doors to their customer's content and not this list, and Dan Rua is simply looking for a scapegoat to come out well in the eyes of those customers.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@ida
If it is all about JavaScript does that make the security slider in Tor Browser (or any other browser means of turning off JavaScript) a circumvention device?

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@ida
If it is all about JavaScript does that make the security slider in Tor Browser (or any other browser means of turning off JavaScript) a circumvention device?

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cleverkraft Aug 11, 2017

I would think this DMCA claim is invalid because EasyList is not primarily used to circumvent access to copyrighted content. As the DMCA says

(2) No person shall manufacture, import, offer to the public, provide, or otherwise traffic in any technology, product, service, device, component, or part thereof, that— (A) is primarily designed or produced for the purpose of circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title; (B) has only limited commercially significant purpose or use other than to circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title; or (C) is marketed by that person or another acting in concert with that person with that person's knowledge for use in circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.

Admiral can say the server isn't serving ads but it IS used for tracking people. And the primary function of EasyList is to prevent ads from loading and users from being tracked. The fact that Admiral claims that their protection system is circumvented when the domain is blocked is THEIR problem since EasyList is provably NOT a circumvention tool.

cleverkraft replied Aug 11, 2017

I would think this DMCA claim is invalid because EasyList is not primarily used to circumvent access to copyrighted content. As the DMCA says

(2) No person shall manufacture, import, offer to the public, provide, or otherwise traffic in any technology, product, service, device, component, or part thereof, that— (A) is primarily designed or produced for the purpose of circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title; (B) has only limited commercially significant purpose or use other than to circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title; or (C) is marketed by that person or another acting in concert with that person with that person's knowledge for use in circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.

Admiral can say the server isn't serving ads but it IS used for tracking people. And the primary function of EasyList is to prevent ads from loading and users from being tracked. The fact that Admiral claims that their protection system is circumvented when the domain is blocked is THEIR problem since EasyList is provably NOT a circumvention tool.

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uda Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely surely not.
If a website has a paywall that loads all content but hides them via JavaScript, then they are using the wrong tool. you can't blame someone of circumventing access control for bypassing something that isn't meant for controlling access.

uda replied Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely surely not.
If a website has a paywall that loads all content but hides them via JavaScript, then they are using the wrong tool. you can't blame someone of circumventing access control for bypassing something that isn't meant for controlling access.

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a-raccoon Aug 11, 2017

Are they using all these 100+ different domains to implement an HSTS fingerprinting attack? If you treat the HTTPS redirect ON / OFF of each domain as a single bit to a large 100+bit value, you wind up with each browser having a unique fingerprint. These "HSTS cookies" can be detected by an ad agency across any site that uses its ad services; These "HSTS cookies" cannot be deleted from a browser (per specification); These "HSTS cookies" reveal a user's identity even while they are in Private Browsing / Incognito mode.

Can anyone confirm my suspicions by looking at their code?

a-raccoon replied Aug 11, 2017

Are they using all these 100+ different domains to implement an HSTS fingerprinting attack? If you treat the HTTPS redirect ON / OFF of each domain as a single bit to a large 100+bit value, you wind up with each browser having a unique fingerprint. These "HSTS cookies" can be detected by an ad agency across any site that uses its ad services; These "HSTS cookies" cannot be deleted from a browser (per specification); These "HSTS cookies" reveal a user's identity even while they are in Private Browsing / Incognito mode.

Can anyone confirm my suspicions by looking at their code?

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senposage Aug 11, 2017

commit should be reverted you can't copy right a domain further more its of violation of NO law to block a domain,regardless of what that domain is used for,further more if your drm is shitty enough to be-defeated by blocking one host then its of no use to anybody

senposage replied Aug 11, 2017

commit should be reverted you can't copy right a domain further more its of violation of NO law to block a domain,regardless of what that domain is used for,further more if your drm is shitty enough to be-defeated by blocking one host then its of no use to anybody

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@senposage It would help if you used proper capitalization and spelling (copyright is one word) and that you do not use profanities.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@senposage It would help if you used proper capitalization and spelling (copyright is one word) and that you do not use profanities.

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senposage Aug 11, 2017

no it would not help the point stands period end of discussion

senposage replied Aug 11, 2017

no it would not help the point stands period end of discussion

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

Are you able to properly capitalize and punctuate?
Even my phone keyboard helps do it for me.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

Are you able to properly capitalize and punctuate?
Even my phone keyboard helps do it for me.

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jbruchon Aug 11, 2017

This DMCA takedown is not allowed by copyright law. It should not be complied with. Furthermore, I'm adding this to all my personal adblock lists permanently in protest.

jbruchon replied Aug 11, 2017

This DMCA takedown is not allowed by copyright law. It should not be complied with. Furthermore, I'm adding this to all my personal adblock lists permanently in protest.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@jbruchon GitHub does not have the legal capacity to determine the validity, just as YouTube does not have the legal capacity to stop Alex Mauer takedown notices. @ryanbr should consider filing a counter-notice due to its invalidity.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@jbruchon GitHub does not have the legal capacity to determine the validity, just as YouTube does not have the legal capacity to stop Alex Mauer takedown notices. @ryanbr should consider filing a counter-notice due to its invalidity.

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jbruchon Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely Agreed, a counter-notice is the best solution. Then they have to take it to court and subsequently get laughed out of it.

jbruchon replied Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely Agreed, a counter-notice is the best solution. Then they have to take it to court and subsequently get laughed out of it.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@jbruchon Or 10 business days pass without response from the complainant and Github gives the green light to re-post.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@jbruchon Or 10 business days pass without response from the complainant and Github gives the green light to re-post.

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ameshkov Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely

@ryanbr should consider filing a counter-notice due to its invalidity.

Meanwhile, the repo will be disrupted or blocked until the counter-notice is ready. Filing a counter-notice will be quite expensive also.

Then they have to take it to court and subsequently get laughed out of it.

And this will be extremely expensive. We're talking about a community-driven project here.

ameshkov replied Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely

@ryanbr should consider filing a counter-notice due to its invalidity.

Meanwhile, the repo will be disrupted or blocked until the counter-notice is ready. Filing a counter-notice will be quite expensive also.

Then they have to take it to court and subsequently get laughed out of it.

And this will be extremely expensive. We're talking about a community-driven project here.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

Counter notice is free if there is no lawsuit. Wonder why nobody mentions GoFundMe? Snopes got over half a million in donations in a day to fight their legal troubles.
Surely EasyList is popular enough to drum up that kind of support?

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

Counter notice is free if there is no lawsuit. Wonder why nobody mentions GoFundMe? Snopes got over half a million in donations in a day to fight their legal troubles.
Surely EasyList is popular enough to drum up that kind of support?

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Topperfalkon Aug 11, 2017

@uda this point exactly. You are not preventing copyright infringement if you use javascript to hide content already served to the user agent. At that point it's trivial to disable javascript, and if the entire content is served as static html in the first instance then some browsers are incapable of running said scripts in any case. That's not circumvention, that's the copyright holder not actually trying to protect their stuff.

Topperfalkon replied Aug 11, 2017

@uda this point exactly. You are not preventing copyright infringement if you use javascript to hide content already served to the user agent. At that point it's trivial to disable javascript, and if the entire content is served as static html in the first instance then some browsers are incapable of running said scripts in any case. That's not circumvention, that's the copyright holder not actually trying to protect their stuff.

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Atavic Aug 11, 2017

There's no copyright infringement in this repository. Either with that URL or without it.

Atavic replied Aug 11, 2017

There's no copyright infringement in this repository. Either with that URL or without it.

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eligrey Aug 11, 2017

Please do not comply with frivolous DMCA takedowns. Tell GitHub that you wish to contest the takedown and file a counter-notice.

eligrey replied Aug 11, 2017

Please do not comply with frivolous DMCA takedowns. Tell GitHub that you wish to contest the takedown and file a counter-notice.

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jnovack Aug 11, 2017

Just make a separate file of all the domains that have made a DMCA request.

The list should only be used as an enumerated list of DMCA take-down requests and nothing more.

jnovack replied Aug 11, 2017

Just make a separate file of all the domains that have made a DMCA request.

The list should only be used as an enumerated list of DMCA take-down requests and nothing more.

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Beaving Aug 11, 2017

@ameshkov A counter notice would not be expensive. You just need to affirm that the content you offer is not violating their rights. No need to explain any further. It can be as broad as you want. 5 minutes of your time, no lawyer needed. When GitHub receives a DMCA, it deactivates the content, when GitHub receives a counter DMCA, it enables it again. The parties can battle in court then.

Beaving replied Aug 11, 2017

@ameshkov A counter notice would not be expensive. You just need to affirm that the content you offer is not violating their rights. No need to explain any further. It can be as broad as you want. 5 minutes of your time, no lawyer needed. When GitHub receives a DMCA, it deactivates the content, when GitHub receives a counter DMCA, it enables it again. The parties can battle in court then.

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hook54321 Aug 11, 2017

I've seen some media outlets post a link to this page, if you've come from one of those and don't have something constructive or helpful to say and just want to express your anger at this then do it here instead: https://discord.me/BlockAdmiral

hook54321 replied Aug 11, 2017

I've seen some media outlets post a link to this page, if you've come from one of those and don't have something constructive or helpful to say and just want to express your anger at this then do it here instead: https://discord.me/BlockAdmiral

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jawz101 Aug 11, 2017

heuristic blocking would solve this, right?

jawz101 replied Aug 11, 2017

heuristic blocking would solve this, right?

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ameshkov Aug 11, 2017

@Beaving @WilliamFeely

  1. A counter-notice should be signed by somebody. EasyList is not a company, so it should be one of the maintainers willing to take the risk.
  2. The risk I am talking about is that the counter-notice may trigger a lawsuit, which is extremely expensive whatever is the outcome.

I think what we should do is not just blindly demand to reinstate the domain but to let EasyList people know that they can rely on us, and we're ready to support them.

ameshkov replied Aug 11, 2017

@Beaving @WilliamFeely

  1. A counter-notice should be signed by somebody. EasyList is not a company, so it should be one of the maintainers willing to take the risk.
  2. The risk I am talking about is that the counter-notice may trigger a lawsuit, which is extremely expensive whatever is the outcome.

I think what we should do is not just blindly demand to reinstate the domain but to let EasyList people know that they can rely on us, and we're ready to support them.

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ameshkov Aug 11, 2017

heuristic blocking would solve this, right?

Yes. Remember the news about perceptual ad blocker? It is time to seriously consider implementing this technology in the main stream ad blockers.

ameshkov replied Aug 11, 2017

heuristic blocking would solve this, right?

Yes. Remember the news about perceptual ad blocker? It is time to seriously consider implementing this technology in the main stream ad blockers.

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nsqe Aug 11, 2017

Hey, all.

A couple of people have reached out to GitHub and asked us to weigh in here. Hi.

We follow the DMCA framework when we receive a complaint with sufficient details. In this case, we received a complaint based on a theory of anti-circumvention.

We apologize if our delay in posting the notice led to any confusion. According to our policy, we allow the repository owner a window of time to make changes before we post the notices, and we also take time to redact any personal information.

To clarify, the dmcahelper account is not affiliated with GitHub.

Hannah Poteat
Privacy & IP Counsel
GitHub, Inc.

nsqe replied Aug 11, 2017

Hey, all.

A couple of people have reached out to GitHub and asked us to weigh in here. Hi.

We follow the DMCA framework when we receive a complaint with sufficient details. In this case, we received a complaint based on a theory of anti-circumvention.

We apologize if our delay in posting the notice led to any confusion. According to our policy, we allow the repository owner a window of time to make changes before we post the notices, and we also take time to redact any personal information.

To clarify, the dmcahelper account is not affiliated with GitHub.

Hannah Poteat
Privacy & IP Counsel
GitHub, Inc.

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hook54321 Aug 11, 2017

@ameshkov
Could they form an LLC and then issue a counter-notice?

hook54321 replied Aug 11, 2017

@ameshkov
Could they form an LLC and then issue a counter-notice?

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jspenguin2017 Aug 11, 2017

@hook54321a That would be too complex and too much work. Since EFF offered help, I guess leaving it to them is the best.

jspenguin2017 replied Aug 11, 2017

@hook54321a That would be too complex and too much work. Since EFF offered help, I guess leaving it to them is the best.

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hook54321 Aug 11, 2017

@gorhill Look who's following you on twitter.
capture999

hook54321 replied Aug 11, 2017

@gorhill Look who's following you on twitter.
capture999

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jawz101 Aug 11, 2017

heuristic blocking would solve this, right?

Yes. Remember the news about perceptual ad blocker? It is time to seriously consider implementing this technology in the main stream ad blockers.

@ameshkov
If I recall, that method was more like a cosmetic blocking. Doesn't do anything to reduce the bandwidth or tracking that could come along with an image. I'm all for hiding stuff but I'd rather firewall the traffic. In-browser would be slick.

I'm thinking more like Privacy Badger, Karma Blocker, LibreJS, Kaspersky Banner Ad Blocker, Bluehell firewall (which is just a big regex string), and Privoxy or Proxomitron (I can't remember which was rule-based. Maybe both.) It may be that building an app which lets you adjust thresholds for variables of certain characteristics of content might be a good approach to learn out to hone in on what constitutes unwanted content. Say, strip out all content that's a transparent pixel. junk like that.

But also look at more modern tracking techniques such as registering service workers, reading sensor values and junk.

I assume it would take a lot of harvesting of desired and undesired javascript and content to come up with some good rules.

Or an easier untrust-all approach.

jawz101 replied Aug 11, 2017

heuristic blocking would solve this, right?

Yes. Remember the news about perceptual ad blocker? It is time to seriously consider implementing this technology in the main stream ad blockers.

@ameshkov
If I recall, that method was more like a cosmetic blocking. Doesn't do anything to reduce the bandwidth or tracking that could come along with an image. I'm all for hiding stuff but I'd rather firewall the traffic. In-browser would be slick.

I'm thinking more like Privacy Badger, Karma Blocker, LibreJS, Kaspersky Banner Ad Blocker, Bluehell firewall (which is just a big regex string), and Privoxy or Proxomitron (I can't remember which was rule-based. Maybe both.) It may be that building an app which lets you adjust thresholds for variables of certain characteristics of content might be a good approach to learn out to hone in on what constitutes unwanted content. Say, strip out all content that's a transparent pixel. junk like that.

But also look at more modern tracking techniques such as registering service workers, reading sensor values and junk.

I assume it would take a lot of harvesting of desired and undesired javascript and content to come up with some good rules.

Or an easier untrust-all approach.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

+hook54321a
To break the following it is simple - click Block then immediately unblock. I do that all the time on my Twitter to kick spam followers that don't quite require blocking.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

+hook54321a
To break the following it is simple - click Block then immediately unblock. I do that all the time on my Twitter to kick spam followers that don't quite require blocking.

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Betsy25 Aug 11, 2017

What about a dummy script, which some of the better ad-blockers already make use of.
NOBODY can claim the ownership of a dummy script that wasn't written by themselves.

Betsy25 replied Aug 11, 2017

What about a dummy script, which some of the better ad-blockers already make use of.
NOBODY can claim the ownership of a dummy script that wasn't written by themselves.

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40ccc Aug 11, 2017

Long term, ditch GitHub and utilise some form of decentralised file hosting?

40ccc replied Aug 11, 2017

Long term, ditch GitHub and utilise some form of decentralised file hosting?

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Tanath Aug 11, 2017

It seems to me that they're circumventing my access controls.

Tanath replied Aug 11, 2017

It seems to me that they're circumventing my access controls.

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mgomersbach Aug 11, 2017

@Tanath interesting point. Is that legal?

mgomersbach replied Aug 11, 2017

@Tanath interesting point. Is that legal?

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7Pass Aug 11, 2017

Let's create a new list for GetAdmiral customers so we can punish their customers while not bypassing their DRM. I don't think it's fair to ask the maintainers of EasyList to fight the legal system for us, we have to make sure that no other ad servers dare to use DMCA again, and best would be for GetAdmiral to be recorded in history of Internet for the worse failure.

7Pass replied Aug 11, 2017

Let's create a new list for GetAdmiral customers so we can punish their customers while not bypassing their DRM. I don't think it's fair to ask the maintainers of EasyList to fight the legal system for us, we have to make sure that no other ad servers dare to use DMCA again, and best would be for GetAdmiral to be recorded in history of Internet for the worse failure.

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31bbb Aug 11, 2017

Lets move the list outside of US jurisdiction; problem solved.

The list should not be moved to a country that is headquartered in the US; or is part of the "five eyes"; I suggest Germany? Or, if you really want to shake shit up, Russia?

Another method is to setup p2p.

Another method is to purchase a VPS and just use gitlab.

31bbb replied Aug 11, 2017

Lets move the list outside of US jurisdiction; problem solved.

The list should not be moved to a country that is headquartered in the US; or is part of the "five eyes"; I suggest Germany? Or, if you really want to shake shit up, Russia?

Another method is to setup p2p.

Another method is to purchase a VPS and just use gitlab.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@bbb31
Not at all problem solved, and you run the risk of referenced domains in the list violating local censorship laws which could give rise to criminal liability.
If you live in the US you cannot escape US jurisdiction by hosting abroad, in fact doing so means you consent to not the US and foreign jurisdictions.
Germany has laws against Nazi imagery, so if any websites in the list have that that would be hazardous. Russia has all sorts of censorship laws that would make the list a minefield.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@bbb31
Not at all problem solved, and you run the risk of referenced domains in the list violating local censorship laws which could give rise to criminal liability.
If you live in the US you cannot escape US jurisdiction by hosting abroad, in fact doing so means you consent to not the US and foreign jurisdictions.
Germany has laws against Nazi imagery, so if any websites in the list have that that would be hazardous. Russia has all sorts of censorship laws that would make the list a minefield.

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jbruchon Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely It seems to me that since the list is specifically a blocking list it can't really run afoul of censorship laws. I see ad blocking lists as a censorship mechanism controlled by the end user. I may be wrong and I'd be interested in hearing why I might be wrong.

jbruchon replied Aug 11, 2017

@WilliamFeely It seems to me that since the list is specifically a blocking list it can't really run afoul of censorship laws. I see ad blocking lists as a censorship mechanism controlled by the end user. I may be wrong and I'd be interested in hearing why I might be wrong.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 11, 2017

@jbruchon I do suspect though the claims that hosting on a foreign server will prevent liability may be coming from those with misinformation regarding copyright law, as this is featured on the homepage of TorrentFreak today.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 11, 2017

@jbruchon I do suspect though the claims that hosting on a foreign server will prevent liability may be coming from those with misinformation regarding copyright law, as this is featured on the homepage of TorrentFreak today.

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Topperfalkon Aug 11, 2017

If you're considering alternate jurisdictions to host in, Iceland wouldn't be the worst bet. I'm sure Piratar would be able to offer some assistance.

Topperfalkon replied Aug 11, 2017

If you're considering alternate jurisdictions to host in, Iceland wouldn't be the worst bet. I'm sure Piratar would be able to offer some assistance.

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Symbai Aug 12, 2017

The reactions here.... forks, blocking the site in Windows hosts lists. Did you ever considered that the DCMA owner don't care about you or the handful of people here? If they target Easylist then they care about all the subscribers (million) of people around the world who got the Easylist auto-updated in their adblockers. They will not know and automatically receive the list with the hostname removed.

So hosts/forks/other lists will not help. The only thing that actually does something useful is that EasyList gets out of range of DCMA and re-add the host, period.

The great majority of adblock users are people who just install an addon and expect everything to work and don't read github or changelogs or even touch any settings. And this DCMA request has targeted these users only cuz they build the majority. So please stop trying to pretend to fight back cuz you figured out how to edit a Windows host list. (Sorry for the harsh words but ive seen this discussion drifting away from the original problem).

Symbai replied Aug 12, 2017

The reactions here.... forks, blocking the site in Windows hosts lists. Did you ever considered that the DCMA owner don't care about you or the handful of people here? If they target Easylist then they care about all the subscribers (million) of people around the world who got the Easylist auto-updated in their adblockers. They will not know and automatically receive the list with the hostname removed.

So hosts/forks/other lists will not help. The only thing that actually does something useful is that EasyList gets out of range of DCMA and re-add the host, period.

The great majority of adblock users are people who just install an addon and expect everything to work and don't read github or changelogs or even touch any settings. And this DCMA request has targeted these users only cuz they build the majority. So please stop trying to pretend to fight back cuz you figured out how to edit a Windows host list. (Sorry for the harsh words but ive seen this discussion drifting away from the original problem).

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burdges Aug 12, 2017

Admiral is inherently a huge malware risk vector. If you cannot block them directly, then you should block all their customers.

I'd suggest adding a new blocking mode to uBlock Origin where any page attempting to load the blocked content gets redirected to a very scary looking warning page, perhaps modeled after Google warning pages, except that users should be given the option to whitelist for a limited period of time, although few would do so when being warned about malware, etc.

burdges replied Aug 12, 2017

Admiral is inherently a huge malware risk vector. If you cannot block them directly, then you should block all their customers.

I'd suggest adding a new blocking mode to uBlock Origin where any page attempting to load the blocked content gets redirected to a very scary looking warning page, perhaps modeled after Google warning pages, except that users should be given the option to whitelist for a limited period of time, although few would do so when being warned about malware, etc.

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patricknelson Aug 12, 2017

Admiral is just using this squarely as a means to boost their revenue and that of advertisers. They're taking advantage of Github's open platform to try and control publicly available information in order to profit and are working to delegitimize your freedom to simply not connect. If you use EasyList, you are expressing your desire (and freedom) not to connect and download advertising, spyware and possible malware attacks. Publishers who advertise are entirely capable of detecting this and preventing you from accessing their site. I see it all of the time and simply leave the website instead of disabling my ad blocker. This is a simple transaction and it forces us to make decisions so we can negotiate through our conscious actions.

They speak freely about this on their insecure homepage and they're boasting about this on their LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/getadmiral. And re: DMCA, Easylist, Adblock, Copyright Access Control & Admiral: 10 Things To Know This is precisely why their use of the weasel word circumventing is so twisted, manipulative and intentionally misleading.

I'm all for 👍 @ameshkov's suggestion of moving this over to Gitlab or literally any other platform that will allow us to allow us to control how we use the Internet instead of allowing it to be unilaterally manipulated like this so transparently for the profit of a select few. I'm a fan of Github, but this is way too far. Let's move forward with #500 once we're off this platform.

patricknelson replied Aug 12, 2017

Admiral is just using this squarely as a means to boost their revenue and that of advertisers. They're taking advantage of Github's open platform to try and control publicly available information in order to profit and are working to delegitimize your freedom to simply not connect. If you use EasyList, you are expressing your desire (and freedom) not to connect and download advertising, spyware and possible malware attacks. Publishers who advertise are entirely capable of detecting this and preventing you from accessing their site. I see it all of the time and simply leave the website instead of disabling my ad blocker. This is a simple transaction and it forces us to make decisions so we can negotiate through our conscious actions.

They speak freely about this on their insecure homepage and they're boasting about this on their LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/getadmiral. And re: DMCA, Easylist, Adblock, Copyright Access Control & Admiral: 10 Things To Know This is precisely why their use of the weasel word circumventing is so twisted, manipulative and intentionally misleading.

I'm all for 👍 @ameshkov's suggestion of moving this over to Gitlab or literally any other platform that will allow us to allow us to control how we use the Internet instead of allowing it to be unilaterally manipulated like this so transparently for the profit of a select few. I'm a fan of Github, but this is way too far. Let's move forward with #500 once we're off this platform.

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31bbb Aug 12, 2017

To anyone interested in generating these lists locally, I have forked easylist added local template generation (maybe you feel like publishing these lists on S3 automatically?), and added the removed domain; and also re-added a list of the compiled domains related to "that" domain.

Since GH was adamant on the removal of source code; they probably will be adamant on the removal of this code as well; so fork away!

https://github.com/bbb31/easylist

31bbb replied Aug 12, 2017

To anyone interested in generating these lists locally, I have forked easylist added local template generation (maybe you feel like publishing these lists on S3 automatically?), and added the removed domain; and also re-added a list of the compiled domains related to "that" domain.

Since GH was adamant on the removal of source code; they probably will be adamant on the removal of this code as well; so fork away!

https://github.com/bbb31/easylist

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 12, 2017

@patricknelson
Unfortunately moving off GitHub would alienate a lot of contributors, and self hosted solutions could potentially become costly if the traffic gets high enough.

Also, would you mind finding a copy of that Linkedin page that doesn't require an account? I deleted my LinkedIn account because I didn't want my boss looking too far into my job-hunting activities.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 12, 2017

@patricknelson
Unfortunately moving off GitHub would alienate a lot of contributors, and self hosted solutions could potentially become costly if the traffic gets high enough.

Also, would you mind finding a copy of that Linkedin page that doesn't require an account? I deleted my LinkedIn account because I didn't want my boss looking too far into my job-hunting activities.

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patricknelson Aug 12, 2017

@WilliamFeely I suppose you're right. What if @a-raccoon's idea of at least simply openly disclosing the list of domains removed due to DMCA requests? Per #501 This will allow people to be aware of the content that is no longer being blocked and it is up to them to continue using EasyList as they wish.

patricknelson replied Aug 12, 2017

@WilliamFeely I suppose you're right. What if @a-raccoon's idea of at least simply openly disclosing the list of domains removed due to DMCA requests? Per #501 This will allow people to be aware of the content that is no longer being blocked and it is up to them to continue using EasyList as they wish.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 12, 2017

That said, has the OP contacted EFF yet?
Until it gets reinstated, perhaps it would be a good idea for someone to maintain a "forbidden domains" list that can be imported into the "custom" section of one's adblocker? Most if not all adblockers allow for custom blacklist subscription URLs.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 12, 2017

That said, has the OP contacted EFF yet?
Until it gets reinstated, perhaps it would be a good idea for someone to maintain a "forbidden domains" list that can be imported into the "custom" section of one's adblocker? Most if not all adblockers allow for custom blacklist subscription URLs.

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patricknelson Aug 12, 2017

@WilliamFeely I've edited my original comment to point to the public version of their page (lucky guess 😉). See here: https://www.linkedin.com/company/getadmiral

patricknelson replied Aug 12, 2017

@WilliamFeely I've edited my original comment to point to the public version of their page (lucky guess 😉). See here: https://www.linkedin.com/company/getadmiral

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patricknelson Aug 12, 2017

I'd also propose a sort of dead man's switch approach; an automated list of domains removed from EasyList with comments containing the reason (or the commit message) for their removal. I think #501 is a good (but still manual) step in that that direction.

patricknelson replied Aug 12, 2017

I'd also propose a sort of dead man's switch approach; an automated list of domains removed from EasyList with comments containing the reason (or the commit message) for their removal. I think #501 is a good (but still manual) step in that that direction.

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31bbb Aug 12, 2017

I've added the "forbidden" list: https://github.com/bbb31/easylist/blob/master/forbidden/forbidden.txt send PR if you have others.

31bbb replied Aug 12, 2017

I've added the "forbidden" list: https://github.com/bbb31/easylist/blob/master/forbidden/forbidden.txt send PR if you have others.

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hook54321 Aug 12, 2017

Can we add all of their other domains to easylist since they haven't DMCA-ed those? We could do only one and wait for them to send a DMCA for that, then add another one, and then repeat, to waste their time.

hook54321 replied Aug 12, 2017

Can we add all of their other domains to easylist since they haven't DMCA-ed those? We could do only one and wait for them to send a DMCA for that, then add another one, and then repeat, to waste their time.

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hook54321 Aug 12, 2017

Brave handled it in an uhm, interesting way: brave/adblock-lists@2c0e86c

hook54321 replied Aug 12, 2017

Brave handled it in an uhm, interesting way: brave/adblock-lists@2c0e86c

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ameshkov Aug 12, 2017

FWIW, we're ready to sponsor the hosting if the guys decide to move the list. Can't say for others, but I guess they also do.

On the other hand, this does not completely solve the issue of a legal trolling and may be perceived as a retreat. Anyway, I'd like to assure EasyList maintainers that when they decide to take action, we will help them with all the means.

ameshkov replied Aug 12, 2017

FWIW, we're ready to sponsor the hosting if the guys decide to move the list. Can't say for others, but I guess they also do.

On the other hand, this does not completely solve the issue of a legal trolling and may be perceived as a retreat. Anyway, I'd like to assure EasyList maintainers that when they decide to take action, we will help them with all the means.

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paulgb Aug 12, 2017

I don't always use a blocker but I wanted to participate in the Streisand Effect happening here, so I created a browser extension that blocks Admiral. I will add other domains if other companies start to see legally threatening open-source projects as a way to have themselves removed from blacklists.

https://github.com/paulgb/BarbBlock

paulgb replied Aug 12, 2017

I don't always use a blocker but I wanted to participate in the Streisand Effect happening here, so I created a browser extension that blocks Admiral. I will add other domains if other companies start to see legally threatening open-source projects as a way to have themselves removed from blacklists.

https://github.com/paulgb/BarbBlock

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M9k Aug 12, 2017

Wait, what?

M9k replied Aug 12, 2017

Wait, what?

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hook54321 Aug 12, 2017

The issue with moving the list to another host is that it will kinda let Admiral win and will inconvenience other block lists on github.

hook54321 replied Aug 12, 2017

The issue with moving the list to another host is that it will kinda let Admiral win and will inconvenience other block lists on github.

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hmage Aug 13, 2017

https://www.whois.com/whois/104.155.48.223 -- The IP addresses under this netblock are in use by Google Cloud customers

They're using Google hosting.

hmage replied Aug 13, 2017

https://www.whois.com/whois/104.155.48.223 -- The IP addresses under this netblock are in use by Google Cloud customers

They're using Google hosting.

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ciravbot Aug 13, 2017

This is why webpages should not be allowed to load anything third party, also why scripting should be disallowed period. So what are our options to fight admiral?

ciravbot replied Aug 13, 2017

This is why webpages should not be allowed to load anything third party, also why scripting should be disallowed period. So what are our options to fight admiral?

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 13, 2017

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With that in mind, do you know if OWASP ZAP can be configured to alert to all third party resources on a web server?
Also, might it be just about time to close this thread, as it has gotten a little out of hand, including with more than a few suggestions that could be considered bad legal advice?

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 13, 2017

@ciravbot
With that in mind, do you know if OWASP ZAP can be configured to alert to all third party resources on a web server?
Also, might it be just about time to close this thread, as it has gotten a little out of hand, including with more than a few suggestions that could be considered bad legal advice?

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divinity76 Aug 13, 2017

hilariously, functionalclam.com say HTTPS is used whenever possible - whilst the front page is 1 big jpg file, and neither the front page, nor the jpg file, is served over https 😆

divinity76 replied Aug 13, 2017

hilariously, functionalclam.com say HTTPS is used whenever possible - whilst the front page is 1 big jpg file, and neither the front page, nor the jpg file, is served over https 😆

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ciravbot Aug 13, 2017

@WilliamFeely That I do not know yet. I am currently researching some options for both the short term with current tech and the long term with new tech. I do believe we are reaching a point where a new browser and rules are needed to help put an end to ads and their ability to detect/circumvent adblockers.

If the advertisers think they can employ DMCA to take us down, we too can do the same. Circumventing adblocking tech to shove ads and malware into a system should be met with the same.

DMCA as it stands now is an outdated system and needs to be repealed or replaced and the more news this gets as well as tieing up the courts will help this come about faster.

ciravbot replied Aug 13, 2017

@WilliamFeely That I do not know yet. I am currently researching some options for both the short term with current tech and the long term with new tech. I do believe we are reaching a point where a new browser and rules are needed to help put an end to ads and their ability to detect/circumvent adblockers.

If the advertisers think they can employ DMCA to take us down, we too can do the same. Circumventing adblocking tech to shove ads and malware into a system should be met with the same.

DMCA as it stands now is an outdated system and needs to be repealed or replaced and the more news this gets as well as tieing up the courts will help this come about faster.

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 13, 2017

+cirvabot it was actually a question regarding my own server in order find and destroy third-party resources.

Regarding your thoughts about DMCA, hopefully this is not abusing this unusual case in order to make it easier to distribute copyrighted works without permission.
Repealing 17 U.S. Code § 512 would put hosting providers in danger of liability for content they have no control over.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 13, 2017

+cirvabot it was actually a question regarding my own server in order find and destroy third-party resources.

Regarding your thoughts about DMCA, hopefully this is not abusing this unusual case in order to make it easier to distribute copyrighted works without permission.
Repealing 17 U.S. Code § 512 would put hosting providers in danger of liability for content they have no control over.

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ciravbot Aug 13, 2017

I don't know what the answer is, there are plenty more people out there more qualified then I who can figure that one out. Something does need to change though and soon. This goes beyond shaving seconds off page load times and securing systems from bad actors on the net. Lists such as EasyList are simply a bandaide and we need to have a larger discussion about moving forward.

ciravbot replied Aug 13, 2017

I don't know what the answer is, there are plenty more people out there more qualified then I who can figure that one out. Something does need to change though and soon. This goes beyond shaving seconds off page load times and securing systems from bad actors on the net. Lists such as EasyList are simply a bandaide and we need to have a larger discussion about moving forward.

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stefek99 Aug 13, 2017

Part of the internet history.

screen shot 2017-08-13 at 20 53 55

stefek99 replied Aug 13, 2017

Part of the internet history.

screen shot 2017-08-13 at 20 53 55

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alessiot89 Aug 13, 2017

What about send a DMCA request to functionalclam?

alessiot89 replied Aug 13, 2017

What about send a DMCA request to functionalclam?

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Serkan-devel Aug 14, 2017

We can make a meme out of this

Serkan-devel replied Aug 14, 2017

We can make a meme out of this

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DXGLdotinfo Aug 14, 2017

@Serkan-devel You mean actually infringe copyright with one of those low effort image macros or an animated GIF screencapped from a copyrighted TV show or movie?
There was no infringement yet on this list.

DXGLdotinfo replied Aug 14, 2017

@Serkan-devel You mean actually infringe copyright with one of those low effort image macros or an animated GIF screencapped from a copyrighted TV show or movie?
There was no infringement yet on this list.

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lclhstr Aug 14, 2017

Feel free to delete the comment. Or tell me and I'll delete it. Here it is, no infringement.
userscantblock

lclhstr replied Aug 14, 2017

Feel free to delete the comment. Or tell me and I'll delete it. Here it is, no infringement.
userscantblock

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Serkan-devel Aug 14, 2017

DMCA-machine broke

Serkan-devel replied Aug 14, 2017

DMCA-machine broke

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nekoswag Aug 14, 2017

Ad peddlers - eat shit and die.

Also made sure to add this domain to all my filters manually now.

STREISAND
T
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nekoswag replied Aug 14, 2017

Ad peddlers - eat shit and die.

Also made sure to add this domain to all my filters manually now.

STREISAND
T
R
E
I
S
A
N
D

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ryanbr Aug 14, 2017

Member

Locking this, its run its course.

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ryanbr replied Aug 14, 2017

Locking this, its run its course.

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