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[zsh] Bye bye oh-my-zsh, hello prezto

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commit 6132049bc2dfb52b972f081fab5dabf6e72fd0c8 1 parent fe3fbf7
@eatnumber1 authored
Showing with 4,397 additions and 191 deletions.
  1. +4 −1 .gitignore
  2. +3 −3 .gitmodules
  3. +0 −1  .oh-my-zsh
  4. +29 −0 .zlogin
  5. +1 −0  .zprezto
  6. +127 −0 .zpreztorc
  7. +42 −0 .zsh/help/alias
  8. +76 −0 .zsh/help/autoload
  9. +4 −0 .zsh/help/bg
  10. +2 −0  .zsh/help/bindkey
  11. +3 −0  .zsh/help/break
  12. +2 −0  .zsh/help/builtin
  13. +10 −0 .zsh/help/bye
  14. +1 −0  .zsh/help/cap
  15. +52 −0 .zsh/help/cd
  16. +52 −0 .zsh/help/chdir
  17. +1 −0  .zsh/help/clone
  18. +4 −0 .zsh/help/colon
  19. +10 −0 .zsh/help/command
  20. +2 −0  .zsh/help/comparguments
  21. +2 −0  .zsh/help/compcall
  22. +2 −0  .zsh/help/compctl
  23. +2 −0  .zsh/help/compdescribe
  24. +2 −0  .zsh/help/compfiles
  25. +2 −0  .zsh/help/compgroups
  26. +2 −0  .zsh/help/compquote
  27. +2 −0  .zsh/help/comptags
  28. +2 −0  .zsh/help/comptry
  29. +2 −0  .zsh/help/compvalues
  30. +4 −0 .zsh/help/continue
  31. +252 −0 .zsh/help/declare
  32. +16 −0 .zsh/help/dirs
  33. +14 −0 .zsh/help/disable
  34. +14 −0 .zsh/help/disown
  35. +18 −0 .zsh/help/dot
  36. +24 −0 .zsh/help/echo
  37. +1 −0  .zsh/help/echotc
  38. +1 −0  .zsh/help/echoti
  39. +76 −0 .zsh/help/emulate
  40. +13 −0 .zsh/help/enable
  41. +6 −0 .zsh/help/eval
  42. +6 −0 .zsh/help/exec
  43. +10 −0 .zsh/help/exit
  44. +5 −0 .zsh/help/export
  45. +2 −0  .zsh/help/false
  46. +94 −0 .zsh/help/fc
  47. +4 −0 .zsh/help/fg
  48. +252 −0 .zsh/help/float
  49. +76 −0 .zsh/help/functions
  50. +1 −0  .zsh/help/getcap
  51. +3 −0  .zsh/help/getln
  52. +29 −0 .zsh/help/getopts
  53. +46 −0 .zsh/help/hash
  54. +94 −0 .zsh/help/history
  55. +252 −0 .zsh/help/integer
  56. +14 −0 .zsh/help/jobs
  57. +24 −0 .zsh/help/kill
  58. +6 −0 .zsh/help/let
  59. +82 −0 .zsh/help/limit
  60. +252 −0 .zsh/help/local
  61. +2 −0  .zsh/help/log
  62. +10 −0 .zsh/help/logout
  63. +2 −0  .zsh/help/noglob
  64. +14 −0 .zsh/help/popd
  65. +74 −0 .zsh/help/print
  66. +30 −0 .zsh/help/printf
  67. +31 −0 .zsh/help/pushd
  68. +74 −0 .zsh/help/pushln
  69. +5 −0 .zsh/help/pwd
  70. +94 −0 .zsh/help/r
  71. +114 −0 .zsh/help/read
  72. +252 −0 .zsh/help/readonly
  73. +46 −0 .zsh/help/rehash
  74. +15 −0 .zsh/help/return
  75. +1 −0  .zsh/help/sched
  76. +50 −0 .zsh/help/set
  77. +1 −0  .zsh/help/setcap
  78. +22 −0 .zsh/help/setopt
  79. +5 −0 .zsh/help/shift
  80. +4 −0 .zsh/help/source
  81. +1 −0  .zsh/help/stat
  82. +4 −0 .zsh/help/suspend
  83. +20 −0 .zsh/help/test
  84. +2 −0  .zsh/help/times
  85. +72 −0 .zsh/help/trap
  86. +2 −0  .zsh/help/true
  87. +9 −0 .zsh/help/ttyctl
  88. +43 −0 .zsh/help/type
  89. +252 −0 .zsh/help/typeset
  90. +48 −0 .zsh/help/ulimit
  91. +8 −0 .zsh/help/umask
  92. +18 −0 .zsh/help/unalias
  93. +18 −0 .zsh/help/unfunction
  94. +18 −0 .zsh/help/unhash
  95. +10 −0 .zsh/help/unlimit
  96. +20 −0 .zsh/help/unset
  97. +8 −0 .zsh/help/unsetopt
  98. +1 −0  .zsh/help/vared
  99. +6 −0 .zsh/help/wait
  100. +43 −0 .zsh/help/whence
  101. +43 −0 .zsh/help/where
  102. +43 −0 .zsh/help/which
  103. +108 −0 .zsh/help/zcompile
  104. +2 −0  .zsh/help/zformat
  105. +1 −0  .zsh/help/zftp
  106. +1 −0  .zsh/help/zle
  107. +304 −0 .zsh/help/zmodload
  108. +2 −0  .zsh/help/zparseopts
  109. +1 −0  .zsh/help/zprof
  110. +1 −0  .zsh/help/zpty
  111. +2 −0  .zsh/help/zregexparse
  112. +2 −0  .zsh/help/zsocket
  113. +1 −0  .zsh/help/zstyle
  114. +1 −0  .zsh/help/ztcp
  115. +130 −102 .zshenv
  116. +116 −0 .zshenv.old
  117. +56 −84 .zshrc
View
5 .gitignore
@@ -18,10 +18,13 @@
!.vimrc
!.zprofile
+!.zlogin
!.zshrc
+!.zshenv.old
!.zshenv
+!.zpretzorc
+!.zpretzo/
!.zsh/
-!.oh-my-zsh/
!.dotprivate/
!.tmux.conf
View
6 .gitmodules
@@ -1,6 +1,3 @@
-[submodule "oh-my-zsh"]
- path = .oh-my-zsh
- url = git@github.com:eatnumber1/oh-my-zsh.git
[submodule "dotprivate"]
path = .dotprivate
url = git@github.com:eatnumber1/dotprivate.git
@@ -28,3 +25,6 @@
[submodule ".vim/bundle/inkpot"]
path = .vim/bundle/inkpot
url = git://github.com/ciaranm/inkpot.git
+[submodule ".zprezto"]
+ path = .zprezto
+ url = https://github.com/sorin-ionescu/prezto.git
1  .oh-my-zsh
@@ -1 +0,0 @@
-Subproject commit fba2c86a7bf3512caa08d547936fe3af592b7425
View
29 .zlogin
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+#
+# Executes commands at login post-zshrc.
+#
+# Authors:
+# Sorin Ionescu <sorin.ionescu@gmail.com>
+#
+
+# Execute code that does not affect the current session in the background.
+{
+ # Compile the completion dump to increase startup speed.
+ zcompdump="${ZDOTDIR:-$HOME}/.zcompdump"
+ if [[ "$zcompdump" -nt "${zcompdump}.zwc" || ! -s "${zcompdump}.zwc" ]]; then
+ zcompile "$zcompdump"
+ fi
+
+ # Set environment variables for launchd processes.
+ if [[ "$OSTYPE" == darwin* ]]; then
+ for env_var in PATH MANPATH; do
+ launchctl setenv "$env_var" "${(P)env_var}"
+ done
+ fi
+} &!
+
+# Print a random, hopefully interesting, adage.
+if (( $+commands[fortune] )); then
+ fortune -a
+ print
+fi
+
1  .zprezto
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+Subproject commit f8da0452cec9de33f94a2c7c0c4a7949033625ae
View
127 .zpreztorc
@@ -0,0 +1,127 @@
+#
+# Sets Prezto options.
+#
+# Authors:
+# Sorin Ionescu <sorin.ionescu@gmail.com>
+#
+
+#
+# General
+#
+
+# Set case-sensitivity for completion, history lookup, etc.
+zstyle ':prezto:*:*' case-sensitive 'yes'
+
+# Color output (auto set to 'no' on dumb terminals).
+zstyle ':prezto:*:*' color 'yes'
+
+# Set the Zsh modules to load (man zshmodules).
+# zstyle ':prezto:load' zmodule 'attr' 'stat'
+
+# Set the Zsh functions to load (man zshcontrib).
+# zstyle ':prezto:load' zfunction 'zargs' 'zmv'
+
+# Set the Prezto modules to load (browse modules).
+# The order matters.
+zstyle ':prezto:load' pmodule \
+ 'environment' \
+ 'terminal' \
+ 'editor' \
+ 'history' \
+ 'directory' \
+ 'spectrum' \
+ 'utility' \
+ 'completion' \
+ 'prompt' \
+ 'syntax-highlighting'
+
+#
+# Editor
+#
+
+# Set the key mapping style to 'emacs' or 'vi'.
+zstyle ':prezto:module:editor' keymap 'emacs'
+
+# Auto convert .... to ../..
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:editor' dot-expansion 'yes'
+
+#
+# Git
+#
+
+# Ignore submodules when they are 'dirty', 'untracked', 'all', or 'none'.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:git:ignore' submodule 'all'
+
+#
+# GNU Utility
+#
+
+# Set the command prefix on non-GNU systems.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:gnu-utility' prefix 'g'
+
+#
+# Pacman
+#
+
+# Set the Pacman frontend.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:pacman' frontend 'yaourt'
+
+#
+# Prompt
+#
+
+# Set the prompt theme to load.
+# Setting it to 'random' loads a random theme.
+# Auto set to 'off' on dumb terminals.
+zstyle ':prezto:module:prompt' theme 'walters'
+
+#
+# Screen
+#
+
+# Auto start a session when Zsh is launched.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:screen' auto-start 'yes'
+
+#
+# GPG-Agent
+#
+
+# Enable SSH-Agent protocol emulation.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:gpg-agent' ssh-support 'yes'
+
+#
+# SSH-Agent
+#
+
+# Enable ssh-agent forwarding.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:ssh-agent' forwarding 'yes'
+
+# Set ssh-agent identities to load.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:ssh-agent' identities 'id_rsa' 'id_rsa2' 'id_github'
+
+#
+# Syntax Highlighting
+#
+
+# Set syntax highlighters.
+# By default main, brackets, and cursor are enabled.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:syntax-highlighting' highlighters \
+# 'main' \
+# 'brackets' \
+# 'pattern' \
+# 'cursor' \
+# 'root'
+
+#
+# Terminal
+#
+
+# Auto set the tab and window titles.
+zstyle ':prezto:module:terminal' auto-title 'yes'
+
+#
+# Tmux
+#
+
+# Auto start a session when Zsh is launched.
+# zstyle ':prezto:module:tmux' auto-start 'yes'
View
42 .zsh/help/alias
@@ -0,0 +1,42 @@
+alias [ {+|-}gmrsL ] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ For each name with a corresponding value, define an alias with
+ that value. A trailing space in value causes the next word to
+ be checked for alias expansion. If the -g flag is present,
+ define a global alias; global aliases are expanded even if they
+ do not occur in command position.
+
+ If the -s flags is present, define a suffix alias: if the com-
+ mand word on a command line is in the form `text.name', where
+ text is any non-empty string, it is replaced by the text `value
+ text.name'. Note that name is treated as a literal string, not
+ a pattern. A trailing space in value is not special in this
+ case. For example,
+
+ alias -s ps=gv
+
+ will cause the command `*.ps' to be expanded to `gv *.ps'. As
+ alias expansion is carried out earlier than globbing, the `*.ps'
+ will then be expanded. Suffix aliases constitute a different
+ name space from other aliases (so in the above example it is
+ still possible to create an alias for the command ps) and the
+ two sets are never listed together.
+
+ For each name with no value, print the value of name, if any.
+ With no arguments, print all currently defined aliases other
+ than suffix aliases. If the -m flag is given the arguments are
+ taken as patterns (they should be quoted to preserve them from
+ being interpreted as glob patterns), and the aliases matching
+ these patterns are printed. When printing aliases and one of
+ the -g, -r or -s flags is present, restrict the printing to
+ global, regular or suffix aliases, respectively; a regular alias
+ is one which is neither a global nor a suffix alias. Using `+'
+ instead of `-', or ending the option list with a single `+',
+ prevents the values of the aliases from being printed.
+
+ If the -L flag is present, then print each alias in a manner
+ suitable for putting in a startup script. The exit status is
+ nonzero if a name (with no value) is given for which no alias
+ has been defined.
+
+ For more on aliases, include common problems, see the section
+ ALIASING in zshmisc(1).
View
76 .zsh/help/autoload
@@ -0,0 +1,76 @@
+functions [ {+|-}UXkmtuz ] [ name ... ]
+functions -M mathfn [ min [ max [ shellfn ] ] ]
+functions -M [ -m pattern ... ]
+functions +M [ -m ] mathfn
+ Equivalent to typeset -f, with the exception of the -M option.
+ Use of the -M option may not be combined with any of the options
+ handled by typeset -f.
+
+ functions -M mathfn defines mathfn as the name of a mathematical
+ function recognised in all forms of arithmetical expressions;
+ see the section `Arithmetic Evaluation' in zshmisc(1). By
+ default mathfn may take any number of comma-separated arguments.
+ If min is given, it must have exactly min args; if min and max
+ are both given, it must have at least min and and at most max
+ args. max may be -1 to indicate that there is no upper limit.
+
+ By default the function is implemented by a shell function of
+ the same name; if shellfn is specified it gives the name of the
+ corresponding shell function while mathfn remains the name used
+ in arithmetical expressions. The name of the function in $0 is
+ mathfn (not shellfn as would usually be the case), provided the
+ option FUNCTION ARGZERO is in effect. The positional parameters
+ in the shell function correspond to the arguments of the mathe-
+ matical function call. The result of the last arithmetical
+ expression evaluated inside the shell function (even if it is a
+ form that normally only returns a status) gives the result of
+ the mathematical function.
+
+ functions -M with no arguments lists all such user-defined func-
+ tions in the same form as a definition. With the additional
+ option -m and a list of arguments, all functions whose mathfn
+ matches one of the pattern arguments are listed.
+
+ function +M removes the list of mathematical functions; with the
+ additional option -m the arguments are treated as patterns and
+ all functions whose mathfn matches the pattern are removed.
+ Note that the shell function implementing the behaviour is not
+ removed (regardless of whether its name coincides with mathfn).
+
+ For example, the following prints the cube of 3:
+
+ zmath cube() { (( $1 * $1 * $1 )) }
+ functions -M cube 1 1 zmath cube
+ print $(( cube(3) ))
+
+autoload [ {+|-}UXktz ] [ -w ] [ name ... ]
+ Equivalent to functions -u, with the exception of -X/+X and -w.
+
+ The flag -X may be used only inside a shell function, and may
+ not be followed by a name. It causes the calling function to be
+ marked for autoloading and then immediately loaded and executed,
+ with the current array of positional parameters as arguments.
+ This replaces the previous definition of the function. If no
+ function definition is found, an error is printed and the func-
+ tion remains undefined and marked for autoloading.
+
+ The flag +X attempts to load each name as an autoloaded func-
+ tion, but does not execute it. The exit status is zero (suc-
+ cess) if the function was not previously defined and a defini-
+ tion for it was found. This does not replace any existing defi-
+ nition of the function. The exit status is nonzero (failure) if
+ the function was already defined or when no definition was
+ found. In the latter case the function remains undefined and
+ marked for autoloading. If ksh-style autoloading is enabled,
+ the function created will contain the contents of the file plus
+ a call to the function itself appended to it, thus giving normal
+ ksh autoloading behaviour on the first call to the function.
+
+ With the -w flag, the names are taken as names of files compiled
+ with the zcompile builtin, and all functions defined in them are
+ marked for autoloading.
+
+ The flags -z and -k mark the function to be autoloaded in native
+ or ksh emulation, as if the option KSH AUTOLOAD were unset or
+ were set, respectively. The flags override the setting of the
+ option at the time the function is loaded.
View
4 .zsh/help/bg
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+bg [ job ... ]
+job ... &
+ Put each specified job in the background, or the current job if
+ none is specified.
View
2  .zsh/help/bindkey
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+bindkey
+ See the section `Zle Builtins' in zshzle(1).
View
3  .zsh/help/break
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+break [ n ]
+ Exit from an enclosing for, while, until, select or repeat loop.
+ If n is specified, then break n levels instead of just one.
View
2  .zsh/help/builtin
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+builtin name [ args ... ]
+ Executes the builtin name, with the given args.
View
10 .zsh/help/bye
@@ -0,0 +1,10 @@
+exit [ n ]
+ Exit the shell with the exit status specified by n; if none is
+ specified, use the exit status from the last command executed.
+ An EOF condition will also cause the shell to exit, unless the
+ IGNORE EOF option is set.
+
+bye Same as exit.
+
+logout [ n ]
+ Same as exit, except that it only works in a login shell.
View
1  .zsh/help/cap
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+cap See the section `The zsh/cap Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
52 .zsh/help/cd
@@ -0,0 +1,52 @@
+cd [ -qsLP ] [ arg ]
+cd [ -qsLP ] old new
+cd [ -qsLP ] {+|-}n
+ Change the current directory. In the first form, change the
+ current directory to arg, or to the value of $HOME if arg is not
+ specified. If arg is `-', change to the previous directory.
+
+ Otherwise, if arg begins with a slash, attempt to change to the
+ directory given by arg.
+
+ If arg does not begin with a slash, the behaviour depends on
+ whether the current directory `.' occurs in the list of directo-
+ ries contained in the shell parameter cdpath. If it does not,
+ first attempt to change to the directory arg under the current
+ directory, and if that fails but cdpath is set and contains at
+ least one element attempt to change to the directory arg under
+ each component of cdpath in turn until successful. If `.'
+ occurs in cdpath, then cdpath is searched strictly in order so
+ that `.' is only tried at the appropriate point.
+
+ The order of testing cdpath is modified if the option POSIX CD
+ is set, as described in the documentation for the option.
+
+ If no directory is found, the option CDABLE VARS is set, and a
+ parameter named arg exists whose value begins with a slash,
+ treat its value as the directory. In that case, the parameter
+ is added to the named directory hash table.
+
+ The second form of cd substitutes the string new for the string
+ old in the name of the current directory, and tries to change to
+ this new directory.
+
+ The third form of cd extracts an entry from the directory stack,
+ and changes to that directory. An argument of the form `+n'
+ identifies a stack entry by counting from the left of the list
+ shown by the dirs command, starting with zero. An argument of
+ the form `-n' counts from the right. If the PUSHD MINUS option
+ is set, the meanings of `+' and `-' in this context are swapped.
+
+ If the -q (quiet) option is specified, the hook function chpwd
+ and the functions in the array chpwd functions are not called.
+ This is useful for calls to cd that do not change the environ-
+ ment seen by an interactive user.
+
+ If the -s option is specified, cd refuses to change the current
+ directory if the given pathname contains symlinks. If the -P
+ option is given or the CHASE LINKS option is set, symbolic links
+ are resolved to their true values. If the -L option is given
+ symbolic links are retained in the directory (and not resolved)
+ regardless of the state of the CHASE LINKS option.
+
+chdir Same as cd.
View
52 .zsh/help/chdir
@@ -0,0 +1,52 @@
+cd [ -qsLP ] [ arg ]
+cd [ -qsLP ] old new
+cd [ -qsLP ] {+|-}n
+ Change the current directory. In the first form, change the
+ current directory to arg, or to the value of $HOME if arg is not
+ specified. If arg is `-', change to the previous directory.
+
+ Otherwise, if arg begins with a slash, attempt to change to the
+ directory given by arg.
+
+ If arg does not begin with a slash, the behaviour depends on
+ whether the current directory `.' occurs in the list of directo-
+ ries contained in the shell parameter cdpath. If it does not,
+ first attempt to change to the directory arg under the current
+ directory, and if that fails but cdpath is set and contains at
+ least one element attempt to change to the directory arg under
+ each component of cdpath in turn until successful. If `.'
+ occurs in cdpath, then cdpath is searched strictly in order so
+ that `.' is only tried at the appropriate point.
+
+ The order of testing cdpath is modified if the option POSIX CD
+ is set, as described in the documentation for the option.
+
+ If no directory is found, the option CDABLE VARS is set, and a
+ parameter named arg exists whose value begins with a slash,
+ treat its value as the directory. In that case, the parameter
+ is added to the named directory hash table.
+
+ The second form of cd substitutes the string new for the string
+ old in the name of the current directory, and tries to change to
+ this new directory.
+
+ The third form of cd extracts an entry from the directory stack,
+ and changes to that directory. An argument of the form `+n'
+ identifies a stack entry by counting from the left of the list
+ shown by the dirs command, starting with zero. An argument of
+ the form `-n' counts from the right. If the PUSHD MINUS option
+ is set, the meanings of `+' and `-' in this context are swapped.
+
+ If the -q (quiet) option is specified, the hook function chpwd
+ and the functions in the array chpwd functions are not called.
+ This is useful for calls to cd that do not change the environ-
+ ment seen by an interactive user.
+
+ If the -s option is specified, cd refuses to change the current
+ directory if the given pathname contains symlinks. If the -P
+ option is given or the CHASE LINKS option is set, symbolic links
+ are resolved to their true values. If the -L option is given
+ symbolic links are retained in the directory (and not resolved)
+ regardless of the state of the CHASE LINKS option.
+
+chdir Same as cd.
View
1  .zsh/help/clone
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+clone See the section `The zsh/clone Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
4 .zsh/help/colon
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+: [ arg ... ]
+ This command does nothing, although normal argument expansions
+ is performed which may have effects on shell parameters. A zero
+ exit status is returned.
View
10 .zsh/help/command
@@ -0,0 +1,10 @@
+command [ -pvV ] simple command
+ The simple command argument is taken as an external command
+ instead of a function or builtin and is executed. If the
+ POSIX BUILTINS option is set, builtins will also be executed but
+ certain special properties of them are suppressed. The -p flag
+ causes a default path to be searched instead of that in $path.
+ With the -v flag, command is similar to whence and with -V, it
+ is equivalent to whence -v.
+
+ See also the section `Precommand Modifiers'.
View
2  .zsh/help/comparguments
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+comparguments
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/compcall
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+compcall
+ See the section `The zsh/compctl Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/compctl
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+compctl
+ See the section `The zsh/compctl Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/compdescribe
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+compdescribe
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/compfiles
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+compfiles
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/compgroups
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+compgroups
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/compquote
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+compquote
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/comptags
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+comptags
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/comptry
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+comptry
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
2  .zsh/help/compvalues
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+compvalues
+ See the section `The zsh/computil Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
4 .zsh/help/continue
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+continue [ n ]
+ Resume the next iteration of the enclosing for, while, until,
+ select or repeat loop. If n is specified, break out of n-1
+ loops and resume at the nth enclosing loop.
View
252 .zsh/help/declare
@@ -0,0 +1,252 @@
+typeset [ {+|-}AEFHUafghklprtuxmz ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+typeset -T [ {+|-}Urux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] SCALAR[=value] array [ sep ]
+ Set or display attributes and values for shell parameters.
+
+ A parameter is created for each name that does not already refer
+ to one. When inside a function, a new parameter is created for
+ every name (even those that already exist), and is unset again
+ when the function completes. See `Local Parameters' in zsh-
+ param(1). The same rules apply to special shell parameters,
+ which retain their special attributes when made local.
+
+ For each name=value assignment, the parameter name is set to
+ value. Note that arrays currently cannot be assigned in typeset
+ expressions, only scalars and integers. Unless the option
+ KSH TYPESET is set, normal expansion rules apply to assignment
+ arguments, so value may be split into separate words; if the
+ option is set, assignments which can be recognised when expan-
+ sion is performed are treated as single words. For example the
+ command typeset vbl=$(echo one two) is treated as having one
+ argument if KSH TYPESET is set, but otherwise is treated as hav-
+ ing the two arguments vbl=one and two.
+
+ If the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not set, for each remain-
+ ing name that refers to a parameter that is set, the name and
+ value of the parameter are printed in the form of an assignment.
+ Nothing is printed for newly-created parameters, or when any
+ attribute flags listed below are given along with the name.
+ Using `+' instead of minus to introduce an attribute turns it
+ off.
+
+ If the -p option is given, parameters and values are printed in
+ the form of a typeset command and an assignment (which will be
+ printed separately for arrays and associative arrays), regard-
+ less of other flags and options. Note that the -h flag on
+ parameters is respected; no value will be shown for these param-
+ eters.
+
+ If the -T option is given, two or three arguments must be
+ present (an exception is that zero arguments are allowed to show
+ the list of parameters created in this fashion). The first two
+ are the name of a scalar and an array parameter (in that order)
+ that will be tied together in the manner of $PATH and $path.
+ The optional third argument is a single-character separator
+ which will be used to join the elements of the array to form the
+ scalar; if absent, a colon is used, as with $PATH. Only the
+ first character of the separator is significant; any remaining
+ characters are ignored. Only the scalar parameter may be
+ assigned an initial value. Both the scalar and the array may
+ otherwise be manipulated as normal. If one is unset, the other
+ will automatically be unset too. There is no way of untying the
+ variables without unsetting them, or converting the type of one
+ of them with another typeset command; +T does not work, assign-
+ ing an array to SCALAR is an error, and assigning a scalar to
+ array sets it to be a single-element array. Note that both
+ `typeset -xT ...' and `export -T ...' work, but only the scalar
+ will be marked for export. Setting the value using the scalar
+ version causes a split on all separators (which cannot be
+ quoted).
+
+ The -g (global) flag is treated specially: it means that any
+ resulting parameter will not be restricted to local scope. Note
+ that this does not necessarily mean that the parameter will be
+ global, as the flag will apply to any existing parameter (even
+ if unset) from an enclosing function. This flag does not affect
+ the parameter after creation, hence it has no effect when list-
+ ing existing parameters, nor does the flag +g have any effect
+ except in combination with -m (see below).
+
+ If no name is present, the names and values of all parameters
+ are printed. In this case the attribute flags restrict the dis-
+ play to only those parameters that have the specified
+ attributes, and using `+' rather than `-' to introduce the flag
+ suppresses printing of the values of parameters when there is no
+ parameter name. Also, if the last option is the word `+', then
+ names are printed but values are not.
+
+ If the -m flag is given the name arguments are taken as patterns
+ (which should be quoted). With no attribute flags, all parame-
+ ters (or functions with the -f flag) with matching names are
+ printed (the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not used in this
+ case). Note that -m is ignored if no patterns are given. If
+ the +g flag is combined with -m, a new local parameter is cre-
+ ated for every matching parameter that is not already local.
+ Otherwise -m applies all other flags or assignments to the
+ existing parameters. Except when assignments are made with
+ name=value, using +m forces the matching parameters to be
+ printed, even inside a function.
+
+ If no attribute flags are given and either no -m flag is present
+ or the +m form was used, each parameter name printed is preceded
+ by a list of the attributes of that parameter (array, associa-
+ tion, exported, integer, readonly). If +m is used with
+ attribute flags, and all those flags are introduced with +, the
+ matching parameter names are printed but their values are not.
+
+ Attribute flags that transform the final value (-L, -R, -Z, -l,
+ u) are only applied to the expanded value at the point of a
+ parameter expansion expression using `$'. They are not applied
+ when a parameter is retrieved internally by the shell for any
+ purpose.
+
+ The following attribute flags may be specified:
+
+ -A The names refer to associative array parameters; see
+ `Array Parameters' in zshparam(1).
+
+ -L Left justify and remove leading blanks from value. If n
+ is nonzero, it defines the width of the field. If n is
+ zero, the width is determined by the width of the value
+ of the first assignment. In the case of numeric parame-
+ ters, the length of the complete value assigned to the
+ parameter is used to determine the width, not the value
+ that would be output.
+
+ The width is the count of characters, which may be multi-
+ byte characters if the MULTIBYTE option is in effect.
+ Note that the screen width of the character is not taken
+ into account; if this is required, use padding with
+ parameter expansion flags ${(ml...)...} as described in
+ `Parameter Expansion Flags' in zshexpn(1).
+
+ When the parameter is expanded, it is filled on the right
+ with blanks or truncated if necessary to fit the field.
+ Note truncation can lead to unexpected results with
+ numeric parameters. Leading zeros are removed if the -Z
+ flag is also set.
+
+ -R Similar to -L, except that right justification is used;
+ when the parameter is expanded, the field is left filled
+ with blanks or truncated from the end. May not be com-
+ bined with the -Z flag.
+
+ -U For arrays (but not for associative arrays), keep only
+ the first occurrence of each duplicated value. This may
+ also be set for colon-separated special parameters like
+ PATH or FIGNORE, etc. This flag has a different meaning
+ when used with -f; see below.
+
+ -Z Specially handled if set along with the -L flag. Other-
+ wise, similar to -R, except that leading zeros are used
+ for padding instead of blanks if the first non-blank
+ character is a digit. Numeric parameters are specially
+ handled: they are always eligible for padding with
+ zeroes, and the zeroes are inserted at an appropriate
+ place in the output.
+
+ -a The names refer to array parameters. An array parameter
+ may be created this way, but it may not be assigned to in
+ the typeset statement. When displaying, both normal and
+ associative arrays are shown.
+
+ -f The names refer to functions rather than parameters. No
+ assignments can be made, and the only other valid flags
+ are -t, -k, -u, -U and -z. The flag -t turns on execu-
+ tion tracing for this function. The -u and -U flags
+ cause the function to be marked for autoloading; -U also
+ causes alias expansion to be suppressed when the function
+ is loaded. The fpath parameter will be searched to find
+ the function definition when the function is first refer-
+ enced; see the section `Functions'. The -k and -z flags
+ make the function be loaded using ksh-style or zsh-style
+ autoloading respectively. If neither is given, the set-
+ ting of the KSH AUTOLOAD option determines how the func-
+ tion is loaded.
+
+ -h Hide: only useful for special parameters (those marked
+ `<S>' in the table in zshparam(1)), and for local parame-
+ ters with the same name as a special parameter, though
+ harmless for others. A special parameter with this
+ attribute will not retain its special effect when made
+ local. Thus after `typeset -h PATH', a function contain-
+ ing `typeset PATH' will create an ordinary local parame-
+ ter without the usual behaviour of PATH. Alternatively,
+ the local parameter may itself be given this attribute;
+ hence inside a function `typeset -h PATH' creates an
+ ordinary local parameter and the special PATH parameter
+ is not altered in any way. It is also possible to create
+ a local parameter using `typeset +h special', where the
+ local copy of special will retain its special properties
+ regardless of having the -h attribute. Global special
+ parameters loaded from shell modules (currently those in
+ zsh/mapfile and zsh/parameter) are automatically given
+ the -h attribute to avoid name clashes.
+
+ -H Hide value: specifies that typeset will not display the
+ value of the parameter when listing parameters; the dis-
+ play for such parameters is always as if the `+' flag had
+ been given. Use of the parameter is in other respects
+ normal, and the option does not apply if the parameter is
+ specified by name, or by pattern with the -m option.
+ This is on by default for the parameters in the
+ zsh/parameter and zsh/mapfile modules. Note, however,
+ that unlike the -h flag this is also useful for non-spe-
+ cial parameters.
+
+ -i Use an internal integer representation. If n is nonzero
+ it defines the output arithmetic base, otherwise it is
+ determined by the first assignment. Bases from 2 to 36
+ inclusive are allowed.
+
+ -E Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to sci-
+ entific notation. If n is nonzero it defines the number
+ of significant figures to display; the default is ten.
+
+ -F Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to
+ fixed-point decimal notation. If n is nonzero it defines
+ the number of digits to display after the decimal point;
+ the default is ten.
+
+ -l Convert the result to lower case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+
+ -r The given names are marked readonly. Note that if name
+ is a special parameter, the readonly attribute can be
+ turned on, but cannot then be turned off.
+
+ -t Tags the named parameters. Tags have no special meaning
+ to the shell. This flag has a different meaning when
+ used with -f; see above.
+
+ -u Convert the result to upper case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+ This flag has a different meaning when used with -f; see
+ above.
+
+ -x Mark for automatic export to the environment of subse-
+ quently executed commands. If the option GLOBAL EXPORT
+ is set, this implies the option -g, unless +g is also
+ explicitly given; in other words the parameter is not
+ made local to the enclosing function. This is for com-
+ patibility with previous versions of zsh.
+
+declare
+ Same as typeset.
+
+float [ {+|-}EFHghlprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -E, except that options irrelevant to
+ floating point numbers are not permitted.
+
+integer [ {+|-}Hghilprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -i, except that options irrelevant to
+ integers are not permitted.
+
+local [ {+|-}AEFHUahlprtux ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ] ...
+ Same as typeset, except that the options -g, and -f are not per-
+ mitted. In this case the -x option does not force the use of
+ -g, i.e. exported variables will be local to functions.
+
+readonly
+ Same as typeset -r.
View
16 .zsh/help/dirs
@@ -0,0 +1,16 @@
+dirs [ -c ] [ arg ... ]
+dirs [ -lpv ]
+ With no arguments, print the contents of the directory stack.
+ Directories are added to this stack with the pushd command, and
+ removed with the cd or popd commands. If arguments are speci-
+ fied, load them onto the directory stack, replacing anything
+ that was there, and push the current directory onto the stack.
+
+ -c clear the directory stack.
+
+ -l print directory names in full instead of using of using ~
+ expressions.
+
+ -p print directory entries one per line.
+
+ -v number the directories in the stack when printing.
View
14 .zsh/help/disable
@@ -0,0 +1,14 @@
+disable [ -afmrs ] name ...
+ Temporarily disable the named hash table elements. The default
+ is to disable builtin commands. This allows you to use an
+ external command with the same name as a builtin command. The
+ -a option causes disable to act on regular or global aliases.
+ The -s option causes disable to act on suffix aliases. The -f
+ option causes disable to act on shell functions. The -r options
+ causes disable to act on reserved words. Without arguments all
+ disabled hash table elements from the corresponding hash table
+ are printed. With the -m flag the arguments are taken as pat-
+ terns (which should be quoted to prevent them from undergoing
+ filename expansion), and all hash table elements from the corre-
+ sponding hash table matching these patterns are disabled. Dis-
+ abled objects can be enabled with the enable command.
View
14 .zsh/help/disown
@@ -0,0 +1,14 @@
+disown [ job ... ]
+job ... &|
+job ... &!
+ Remove the specified jobs from the job table; the shell will no
+ longer report their status, and will not complain if you try to
+ exit an interactive shell with them running or stopped. If no
+ job is specified, disown the current job.
+
+ If the jobs are currently stopped and the AUTO CONTINUE option
+ is not set, a warning is printed containing information about
+ how to make them running after they have been disowned. If one
+ of the latter two forms is used, the jobs will automatically be
+ made running, independent of the setting of the AUTO CONTINUE
+ option.
View
18 .zsh/help/dot
@@ -0,0 +1,18 @@
+. file [ arg ... ]
+ Read commands from file and execute them in the current shell
+ environment.
+
+ If file does not contain a slash, or if PATH DIRS is set, the
+ shell looks in the components of $path to find the directory
+ containing file. Files in the current directory are not read
+ unless `.' appears somewhere in $path. If a file named
+ `file.zwc' is found, is newer than file, and is the compiled
+ form (created with the zcompile builtin) of file, then commands
+ are read from that file instead of file.
+
+ If any arguments arg are given, they become the positional
+ parameters; the old positional parameters are restored when the
+ file is done executing. If file was not found the return status
+ is 127; if file was found but contained a syntax error the
+ return status is 126; else the return status is the exit status
+ of the last command executed.
View
24 .zsh/help/echo
@@ -0,0 +1,24 @@
+echo [ -neE ] [ arg ... ]
+ Write each arg on the standard output, with a space separating
+ each one. If the -n flag is not present, print a newline at the
+ end. echo recognizes the following escape sequences:
+
+ \a bell character
+ \b backspace
+ \c suppress final newline
+ \e escape
+ \f form feed
+ \n linefeed (newline)
+ \r carriage return
+ \t horizontal tab
+ \v vertical tab
+ \\ backslash
+ \0NNN character code in octal
+ \xNN character code in hexadecimal
+ \uNNNN unicode character code in hexadecimal
+ \UNNNNNNNN
+ unicode character code in hexadecimal
+
+ The -E flag, or the BSD ECHO option, can be used to disable
+ these escape sequences. In the latter case, -e flag can be used
+ to enable them.
View
1  .zsh/help/echotc
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+echotc See the section `The zsh/termcap Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
1  .zsh/help/echoti
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+echoti See the section `The zsh/terminfo Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
76 .zsh/help/emulate
@@ -0,0 +1,76 @@
+emulate [ -LR ] [ {zsh|sh|ksh|csh} [ -c arg ] ]
+ Without any argument print current emulation mode.
+
+ With single argument set up zsh options to emulate the specified
+ shell as much as possible. csh will never be fully emulated.
+ If the argument is not one of the shells listed above, zsh will
+ be used as a default; more precisely, the tests performed on the
+ argument are the same as those used to determine the emulation
+ at startup based on the shell name, see the section `Compatibil-
+ ity' in zshmisc(1) .
+
+ If the -R option is given, all options are reset to their
+ default value corresponding to the specified emulation mode,
+ except for certain options describing the interactive environ-
+ ment; otherwise, only those options likely to cause portability
+ problems in scripts and functions are altered. If the -L option
+ is given, the options LOCAL OPTIONS and LOCAL TRAPS will be set
+ as well, causing the effects of the emulate command and any
+ setopt and trap commands to be local to the immediately sur-
+ rounding shell function, if any; normally these options are
+ turned off in all emulation modes except ksh. The -L and -c are
+ mutually exclusive.
+
+ If -c arg is given, evaluate arg while the requested emulation
+ is temporarily in effect. The emulation and all options will be
+ restored to their original values before emulate returns. The
+ -R flag may be used.
+
+ Use of -c enables `sticky' emulation mode for functions defined
+ within the evaluated expression: the emulation mode is associ-
+ ated thereafter with the function so that whenever the function
+ is executed the emulation (respecting the -R flag, if present)
+ and all options are set before entry to the function, and
+ restored after exit. If the function is called when the sticky
+ emulation is already in effect, either within an `emulate shell
+ -c' expression or within another function with the same sticky
+ emulation, entry and exit from the function do not cause options
+ to be altered (except due to standard processing such as the
+ LOCAL OPTIONS option).
+
+ For example:
+
+ emulate sh -c 'fni() { setopt cshnullglob; }
+ fno() { fni; }'
+ fno
+
+ The two functions fni and fno are defined with sticky sh emula-
+ tion. fno is then executed, causing options associated with
+ emulations to be set to their values in sh. fni then calls fno;
+ because fno is also marked for sticky sh emulation, no option
+ changes take place on entry to or exit from it. Hence the
+ option cshnullglob, turned off by sh emulation, will be turned
+ on within fni and remain on on return to fno. On exit from fno,
+ the emulation mode and all options will be restored to the state
+ they were in before entry to the temporary emulation.
+
+ The documentation above is typically sufficient for the intended
+ purpose of executing code designed for other shells in a suit-
+ able environment. More detailed rules follow.
+ 1. The sticky emulation environment provided by `emulate
+ shell -c' is identical to that provided by entry to a
+ function marked for sticky emulation as a consequence of
+ being defined in such an environment. Hence, for exam-
+ ple, the sticky emulation is inherited by subfunctions
+ defined within functions with sticky emulation.
+ 2. No change of options takes place on entry to or exit from
+ functions that are not marked for sticky emulation, other
+ than those that would normally take place, even if those
+ functions are called within sticky emulation.
+ 3. No special handling is provided for functions marked for
+ autoload nor for functions present in wordcode created by
+ the zcompile command.
+ 4. The presence or absence of the -R flag to emulate corre-
+ sponds to different sticky emulation modes, so for exam-
+ ple `emulate sh -c', `emulate -R sh -c' and `emulate csh
+ -c' are treated as three distinct sticky emulations.
View
13 .zsh/help/enable
@@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
+enable [ -afmrs ] name ...
+ Enable the named hash table elements, presumably disabled ear-
+ lier with disable. The default is to enable builtin commands.
+ The -a option causes enable to act on regular or global aliases.
+ The -s option causes enable to act on suffix aliases. The -f
+ option causes enable to act on shell functions. The -r option
+ causes enable to act on reserved words. Without arguments all
+ enabled hash table elements from the corresponding hash table
+ are printed. With the -m flag the arguments are taken as pat-
+ terns (should be quoted) and all hash table elements from the
+ corresponding hash table matching these patterns are enabled.
+ Enabled objects can be disabled with the disable builtin com-
+ mand.
View
6 .zsh/help/eval
@@ -0,0 +1,6 @@
+eval [ arg ... ]
+ Read the arguments as input to the shell and execute the result-
+ ing command(s) in the current shell process. The return status
+ is the same as if the commands had been executed directly by the
+ shell; if there are no args or they contain no commands (i.e.
+ are an empty string or whitespace) the return status is zero.
View
6 .zsh/help/exec
@@ -0,0 +1,6 @@
+exec [ -cl ] [ -a argv0 ] simple command
+ Replace the current shell with an external command rather than
+ forking. With -c clear the environment; with -l prepend - to
+ the argv[0] string of the command executed (to simulate a login
+ shell); with -a argv0 set the argv[0] string of the command exe-
+ cuted. See the section `Precommand Modifiers'.
View
10 .zsh/help/exit
@@ -0,0 +1,10 @@
+exit [ n ]
+ Exit the shell with the exit status specified by n; if none is
+ specified, use the exit status from the last command executed.
+ An EOF condition will also cause the shell to exit, unless the
+ IGNORE EOF option is set.
+
+bye Same as exit.
+
+logout [ n ]
+ Same as exit, except that it only works in a login shell.
View
5 .zsh/help/export
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+export [ name[=value] ... ]
+ The specified names are marked for automatic export to the envi-
+ ronment of subsequently executed commands. Equivalent to type-
+ set -gx. If a parameter specified does not already exist, it is
+ created in the global scope.
View
2  .zsh/help/false
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+false [ arg ... ]
+ Do nothing and return an exit status of 1.
View
94 .zsh/help/fc
@@ -0,0 +1,94 @@
+fc [ -e ename ] [ -m match ] [ old=new ... ] [ first [ last ] ]
+fc -l [ -nrdfEiD ] [ -t timefmt ] [ -m match ]
+ [ old=new ... ] [ first [ last ] ]
+fc -p [ -a ] [ filename [ histsize [ savehistsize ] ] ]
+fc -P
+fc -ARWI [ filename ]
+ Select a range of commands from first to last from the history
+ list. The arguments first and last may be specified as a number
+ or as a string. A negative number is used as an offset to the
+ current history event number. A string specifies the most
+ recent event beginning with the given string. All substitutions
+ old=new, if any, are then performed on the commands.
+
+ If the -l flag is given, the resulting commands are listed on
+ standard output. If the -m flag is also given the first argu-
+ ment is taken as a pattern (should be quoted) and only the his-
+ tory events matching this pattern will be shown. Otherwise the
+ editor program ename is invoked on a file containing these his-
+ tory events. If ename is not given, the value of the parameter
+ FCEDIT is used; if that is not set the value of the parameter
+ EDITOR is used; if that is not set a builtin default, usually
+ `vi' is used. If ename is `-', no editor is invoked. When
+ editing is complete, the edited command is executed.
+
+ If first is not specified, it will be set to -1 (the most recent
+ event), or to -16 if the -l flag is given. If last is not spec-
+ ified, it will be set to first, or to -1 if the -l flag is
+ given.
+
+ The flag -r reverses the order of the commands and the flag -n
+ suppresses command numbers when listing.
+
+ Also when listing,
+ -d prints timestamps for each command
+ -f prints full time-date stamps in the US `MM/DD/YY hh:mm'
+ format
+ -E prints full time-date stamps in the European `dd.mm.yyyy
+ hh:mm' format
+ -i prints full time-date stamps in ISO8601 `yyyy-mm-dd
+ hh:mm' format
+ -t fmt prints time and date stamps in the given format; fmt is
+ formatted with the strftime function with the zsh exten-
+ sions described for the %D{string} prompt format in the
+ section EXPANSION OF PROMPT SEQUENCES in zshmisc(1). The
+ resulting formatted string must be no more than 256 char-
+ acters or will not be printed.
+ -D prints elapsed times; may be combined with one of the
+ options above.
+
+ `fc -p' pushes the current history list onto a stack and
+ switches to a new history list. If the -a option is also speci-
+ fied, this history list will be automatically popped when the
+ current function scope is exited, which is a much better solu-
+ tion than creating a trap function to call `fc -P' manually. If
+ no arguments are specified, the history list is left empty,
+ $HISTFILE is unset, and $HISTSIZE & $SAVEHIST are set to their
+ default values. If one argument is given, $HISTFILE is set to
+ that filename, $HISTSIZE & $SAVEHIST are left unchanged, and the
+ history file is read in (if it exists) to initialize the new
+ list. If a second argument is specified, $HISTSIZE & $SAVEHIST
+ are instead set to the single specified numeric value. Finally,
+ if a third argument is specified, $SAVEHIST is set to a separate
+ value from $HISTSIZE. You are free to change these environment
+ values for the new history list however you desire in order to
+ manipulate the new history list.
+
+ `fc -P' pops the history list back to an older list saved by `fc
+ -p'. The current list is saved to its $HISTFILE before it is
+ destroyed (assuming that $HISTFILE and $SAVEHIST are set appro-
+ priately, of course). The values of $HISTFILE, $HISTSIZE, and
+ $SAVEHIST are restored to the values they had when `fc -p' was
+ called. Note that this restoration can conflict with making
+ these variables "local", so your best bet is to avoid local dec-
+ larations for these variables in functions that use `fc -p'.
+ The one other guaranteed-safe combination is declaring these
+ variables to be local at the top of your function and using the
+ automatic option (-a) with `fc -p'. Finally, note that it is
+ legal to manually pop a push marked for automatic popping if you
+ need to do so before the function exits.
+
+ `fc -R' reads the history from the given file, `fc -W' writes
+ the history out to the given file, and `fc -A' appends the his-
+ tory out to the given file. If no filename is specified, the
+ $HISTFILE is assumed. If the -I option is added to -R, only
+ those events that are not already contained within the internal
+ history list are added. If the -I option is added to -A or -W,
+ only those events that are new since last incremental
+ append/write to the history file are appended/written. In any
+ case, the created file will have no more than $SAVEHIST entries.
+
+history
+ Same as fc -l.
+
+r Same as fc -e -.
View
4 .zsh/help/fg
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+fg [ job ... ]
+job ...
+ Bring each specified job in turn to the foreground. If no job
+ is specified, resume the current job.
View
252 .zsh/help/float
@@ -0,0 +1,252 @@
+typeset [ {+|-}AEFHUafghklprtuxmz ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+typeset -T [ {+|-}Urux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] SCALAR[=value] array [ sep ]
+ Set or display attributes and values for shell parameters.
+
+ A parameter is created for each name that does not already refer
+ to one. When inside a function, a new parameter is created for
+ every name (even those that already exist), and is unset again
+ when the function completes. See `Local Parameters' in zsh-
+ param(1). The same rules apply to special shell parameters,
+ which retain their special attributes when made local.
+
+ For each name=value assignment, the parameter name is set to
+ value. Note that arrays currently cannot be assigned in typeset
+ expressions, only scalars and integers. Unless the option
+ KSH TYPESET is set, normal expansion rules apply to assignment
+ arguments, so value may be split into separate words; if the
+ option is set, assignments which can be recognised when expan-
+ sion is performed are treated as single words. For example the
+ command typeset vbl=$(echo one two) is treated as having one
+ argument if KSH TYPESET is set, but otherwise is treated as hav-
+ ing the two arguments vbl=one and two.
+
+ If the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not set, for each remain-
+ ing name that refers to a parameter that is set, the name and
+ value of the parameter are printed in the form of an assignment.
+ Nothing is printed for newly-created parameters, or when any
+ attribute flags listed below are given along with the name.
+ Using `+' instead of minus to introduce an attribute turns it
+ off.
+
+ If the -p option is given, parameters and values are printed in
+ the form of a typeset command and an assignment (which will be
+ printed separately for arrays and associative arrays), regard-
+ less of other flags and options. Note that the -h flag on
+ parameters is respected; no value will be shown for these param-
+ eters.
+
+ If the -T option is given, two or three arguments must be
+ present (an exception is that zero arguments are allowed to show
+ the list of parameters created in this fashion). The first two
+ are the name of a scalar and an array parameter (in that order)
+ that will be tied together in the manner of $PATH and $path.
+ The optional third argument is a single-character separator
+ which will be used to join the elements of the array to form the
+ scalar; if absent, a colon is used, as with $PATH. Only the
+ first character of the separator is significant; any remaining
+ characters are ignored. Only the scalar parameter may be
+ assigned an initial value. Both the scalar and the array may
+ otherwise be manipulated as normal. If one is unset, the other
+ will automatically be unset too. There is no way of untying the
+ variables without unsetting them, or converting the type of one
+ of them with another typeset command; +T does not work, assign-
+ ing an array to SCALAR is an error, and assigning a scalar to
+ array sets it to be a single-element array. Note that both
+ `typeset -xT ...' and `export -T ...' work, but only the scalar
+ will be marked for export. Setting the value using the scalar
+ version causes a split on all separators (which cannot be
+ quoted).
+
+ The -g (global) flag is treated specially: it means that any
+ resulting parameter will not be restricted to local scope. Note
+ that this does not necessarily mean that the parameter will be
+ global, as the flag will apply to any existing parameter (even
+ if unset) from an enclosing function. This flag does not affect
+ the parameter after creation, hence it has no effect when list-
+ ing existing parameters, nor does the flag +g have any effect
+ except in combination with -m (see below).
+
+ If no name is present, the names and values of all parameters
+ are printed. In this case the attribute flags restrict the dis-
+ play to only those parameters that have the specified
+ attributes, and using `+' rather than `-' to introduce the flag
+ suppresses printing of the values of parameters when there is no
+ parameter name. Also, if the last option is the word `+', then
+ names are printed but values are not.
+
+ If the -m flag is given the name arguments are taken as patterns
+ (which should be quoted). With no attribute flags, all parame-
+ ters (or functions with the -f flag) with matching names are
+ printed (the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not used in this
+ case). Note that -m is ignored if no patterns are given. If
+ the +g flag is combined with -m, a new local parameter is cre-
+ ated for every matching parameter that is not already local.
+ Otherwise -m applies all other flags or assignments to the
+ existing parameters. Except when assignments are made with
+ name=value, using +m forces the matching parameters to be
+ printed, even inside a function.
+
+ If no attribute flags are given and either no -m flag is present
+ or the +m form was used, each parameter name printed is preceded
+ by a list of the attributes of that parameter (array, associa-
+ tion, exported, integer, readonly). If +m is used with
+ attribute flags, and all those flags are introduced with +, the
+ matching parameter names are printed but their values are not.
+
+ Attribute flags that transform the final value (-L, -R, -Z, -l,
+ u) are only applied to the expanded value at the point of a
+ parameter expansion expression using `$'. They are not applied
+ when a parameter is retrieved internally by the shell for any
+ purpose.
+
+ The following attribute flags may be specified:
+
+ -A The names refer to associative array parameters; see
+ `Array Parameters' in zshparam(1).
+
+ -L Left justify and remove leading blanks from value. If n
+ is nonzero, it defines the width of the field. If n is
+ zero, the width is determined by the width of the value
+ of the first assignment. In the case of numeric parame-
+ ters, the length of the complete value assigned to the
+ parameter is used to determine the width, not the value
+ that would be output.
+
+ The width is the count of characters, which may be multi-
+ byte characters if the MULTIBYTE option is in effect.
+ Note that the screen width of the character is not taken
+ into account; if this is required, use padding with
+ parameter expansion flags ${(ml...)...} as described in
+ `Parameter Expansion Flags' in zshexpn(1).
+
+ When the parameter is expanded, it is filled on the right
+ with blanks or truncated if necessary to fit the field.
+ Note truncation can lead to unexpected results with
+ numeric parameters. Leading zeros are removed if the -Z
+ flag is also set.
+
+ -R Similar to -L, except that right justification is used;
+ when the parameter is expanded, the field is left filled
+ with blanks or truncated from the end. May not be com-
+ bined with the -Z flag.
+
+ -U For arrays (but not for associative arrays), keep only
+ the first occurrence of each duplicated value. This may
+ also be set for colon-separated special parameters like
+ PATH or FIGNORE, etc. This flag has a different meaning
+ when used with -f; see below.
+
+ -Z Specially handled if set along with the -L flag. Other-
+ wise, similar to -R, except that leading zeros are used
+ for padding instead of blanks if the first non-blank
+ character is a digit. Numeric parameters are specially
+ handled: they are always eligible for padding with
+ zeroes, and the zeroes are inserted at an appropriate
+ place in the output.
+
+ -a The names refer to array parameters. An array parameter
+ may be created this way, but it may not be assigned to in
+ the typeset statement. When displaying, both normal and
+ associative arrays are shown.
+
+ -f The names refer to functions rather than parameters. No
+ assignments can be made, and the only other valid flags
+ are -t, -k, -u, -U and -z. The flag -t turns on execu-
+ tion tracing for this function. The -u and -U flags
+ cause the function to be marked for autoloading; -U also
+ causes alias expansion to be suppressed when the function
+ is loaded. The fpath parameter will be searched to find
+ the function definition when the function is first refer-
+ enced; see the section `Functions'. The -k and -z flags
+ make the function be loaded using ksh-style or zsh-style
+ autoloading respectively. If neither is given, the set-
+ ting of the KSH AUTOLOAD option determines how the func-
+ tion is loaded.
+
+ -h Hide: only useful for special parameters (those marked
+ `<S>' in the table in zshparam(1)), and for local parame-
+ ters with the same name as a special parameter, though
+ harmless for others. A special parameter with this
+ attribute will not retain its special effect when made
+ local. Thus after `typeset -h PATH', a function contain-
+ ing `typeset PATH' will create an ordinary local parame-
+ ter without the usual behaviour of PATH. Alternatively,
+ the local parameter may itself be given this attribute;
+ hence inside a function `typeset -h PATH' creates an
+ ordinary local parameter and the special PATH parameter
+ is not altered in any way. It is also possible to create
+ a local parameter using `typeset +h special', where the
+ local copy of special will retain its special properties
+ regardless of having the -h attribute. Global special
+ parameters loaded from shell modules (currently those in
+ zsh/mapfile and zsh/parameter) are automatically given
+ the -h attribute to avoid name clashes.
+
+ -H Hide value: specifies that typeset will not display the
+ value of the parameter when listing parameters; the dis-
+ play for such parameters is always as if the `+' flag had
+ been given. Use of the parameter is in other respects
+ normal, and the option does not apply if the parameter is
+ specified by name, or by pattern with the -m option.
+ This is on by default for the parameters in the
+ zsh/parameter and zsh/mapfile modules. Note, however,
+ that unlike the -h flag this is also useful for non-spe-
+ cial parameters.
+
+ -i Use an internal integer representation. If n is nonzero
+ it defines the output arithmetic base, otherwise it is
+ determined by the first assignment. Bases from 2 to 36
+ inclusive are allowed.
+
+ -E Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to sci-
+ entific notation. If n is nonzero it defines the number
+ of significant figures to display; the default is ten.
+
+ -F Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to
+ fixed-point decimal notation. If n is nonzero it defines
+ the number of digits to display after the decimal point;
+ the default is ten.
+
+ -l Convert the result to lower case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+
+ -r The given names are marked readonly. Note that if name
+ is a special parameter, the readonly attribute can be
+ turned on, but cannot then be turned off.
+
+ -t Tags the named parameters. Tags have no special meaning
+ to the shell. This flag has a different meaning when
+ used with -f; see above.
+
+ -u Convert the result to upper case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+ This flag has a different meaning when used with -f; see
+ above.
+
+ -x Mark for automatic export to the environment of subse-
+ quently executed commands. If the option GLOBAL EXPORT
+ is set, this implies the option -g, unless +g is also
+ explicitly given; in other words the parameter is not
+ made local to the enclosing function. This is for com-
+ patibility with previous versions of zsh.
+
+declare
+ Same as typeset.
+
+float [ {+|-}EFHghlprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -E, except that options irrelevant to
+ floating point numbers are not permitted.
+
+integer [ {+|-}Hghilprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -i, except that options irrelevant to
+ integers are not permitted.
+
+local [ {+|-}AEFHUahlprtux ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ] ...
+ Same as typeset, except that the options -g, and -f are not per-
+ mitted. In this case the -x option does not force the use of
+ -g, i.e. exported variables will be local to functions.
+
+readonly
+ Same as typeset -r.
View
76 .zsh/help/functions
@@ -0,0 +1,76 @@
+functions [ {+|-}UXkmtuz ] [ name ... ]
+functions -M mathfn [ min [ max [ shellfn ] ] ]
+functions -M [ -m pattern ... ]
+functions +M [ -m ] mathfn
+ Equivalent to typeset -f, with the exception of the -M option.
+ Use of the -M option may not be combined with any of the options
+ handled by typeset -f.
+
+ functions -M mathfn defines mathfn as the name of a mathematical
+ function recognised in all forms of arithmetical expressions;
+ see the section `Arithmetic Evaluation' in zshmisc(1). By
+ default mathfn may take any number of comma-separated arguments.
+ If min is given, it must have exactly min args; if min and max
+ are both given, it must have at least min and and at most max
+ args. max may be -1 to indicate that there is no upper limit.
+
+ By default the function is implemented by a shell function of
+ the same name; if shellfn is specified it gives the name of the
+ corresponding shell function while mathfn remains the name used
+ in arithmetical expressions. The name of the function in $0 is
+ mathfn (not shellfn as would usually be the case), provided the
+ option FUNCTION ARGZERO is in effect. The positional parameters
+ in the shell function correspond to the arguments of the mathe-
+ matical function call. The result of the last arithmetical
+ expression evaluated inside the shell function (even if it is a
+ form that normally only returns a status) gives the result of
+ the mathematical function.
+
+ functions -M with no arguments lists all such user-defined func-
+ tions in the same form as a definition. With the additional
+ option -m and a list of arguments, all functions whose mathfn
+ matches one of the pattern arguments are listed.
+
+ function +M removes the list of mathematical functions; with the
+ additional option -m the arguments are treated as patterns and
+ all functions whose mathfn matches the pattern are removed.
+ Note that the shell function implementing the behaviour is not
+ removed (regardless of whether its name coincides with mathfn).
+
+ For example, the following prints the cube of 3:
+
+ zmath cube() { (( $1 * $1 * $1 )) }
+ functions -M cube 1 1 zmath cube
+ print $(( cube(3) ))
+
+autoload [ {+|-}UXktz ] [ -w ] [ name ... ]
+ Equivalent to functions -u, with the exception of -X/+X and -w.
+
+ The flag -X may be used only inside a shell function, and may
+ not be followed by a name. It causes the calling function to be
+ marked for autoloading and then immediately loaded and executed,
+ with the current array of positional parameters as arguments.
+ This replaces the previous definition of the function. If no
+ function definition is found, an error is printed and the func-
+ tion remains undefined and marked for autoloading.
+
+ The flag +X attempts to load each name as an autoloaded func-
+ tion, but does not execute it. The exit status is zero (suc-
+ cess) if the function was not previously defined and a defini-
+ tion for it was found. This does not replace any existing defi-
+ nition of the function. The exit status is nonzero (failure) if
+ the function was already defined or when no definition was
+ found. In the latter case the function remains undefined and
+ marked for autoloading. If ksh-style autoloading is enabled,
+ the function created will contain the contents of the file plus
+ a call to the function itself appended to it, thus giving normal
+ ksh autoloading behaviour on the first call to the function.
+
+ With the -w flag, the names are taken as names of files compiled
+ with the zcompile builtin, and all functions defined in them are
+ marked for autoloading.
+
+ The flags -z and -k mark the function to be autoloaded in native
+ or ksh emulation, as if the option KSH AUTOLOAD were unset or
+ were set, respectively. The flags override the setting of the
+ option at the time the function is loaded.
View
1  .zsh/help/getcap
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+getcap See the section `The zsh/cap Module' in zshmodules(1).
View
3  .zsh/help/getln
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+getln [ -AclneE ] name ...
+ Read the top value from the buffer stack and put it in the shell
+ parameter name. Equivalent to read -zr.
View
29 .zsh/help/getopts
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+getopts optstring name [ arg ... ]
+ Checks the args for legal options. If the args are omitted, use
+ the positional parameters. A valid option argument begins with
+ a `+' or a `-'. An argument not beginning with a `+' or a `-',
+ or the argument `--', ends the options. Note that a single `-'
+ is not considered a valid option argument. optstring contains
+ the letters that getopts recognizes. If a letter is followed by
+ a `:', that option requires an argument. The options can be
+ separated from the argument by blanks.
+
+ Each time it is invoked, getopts places the option letter it
+ finds in the shell parameter name, prepended with a `+' when arg
+ begins with a `+'. The index of the next arg is stored in
+ OPTIND. The option argument, if any, is stored in OPTARG.
+
+ The first option to be examined may be changed by explicitly
+ assigning to OPTIND. OPTIND has an initial value of 1, and is
+ normally reset to 1 upon exit from a shell function. OPTARG is
+ not reset and retains its value from the most recent call to
+ getopts. If either of OPTIND or OPTARG is explicitly unset, it
+ remains unset, and the index or option argument is not stored.
+ The option itself is still stored in name in this case.
+
+ A leading `:' in optstring causes getopts to store the letter of
+ any invalid option in OPTARG, and to set name to `?' for an
+ unknown option and to `:' when a required argument is missing.
+ Otherwise, getopts sets name to `?' and prints an error message
+ when an option is invalid. The exit status is nonzero when
+ there are no more options.
View
46 .zsh/help/hash
@@ -0,0 +1,46 @@
+hash [ -Ldfmrv ] [ name[=value] ] ...
+ hash can be used to directly modify the contents of the command
+ hash table, and the named directory hash table. Normally one
+ would modify these tables by modifying one's PATH (for the com-
+ mand hash table) or by creating appropriate shell parameters
+ (for the named directory hash table). The choice of hash table
+ to work on is determined by the -d option; without the option
+ the command hash table is used, and with the option the named
+ directory hash table is used.
+
+ Given no arguments, and neither the -r or -f options, the
+ selected hash table will be listed in full.
+
+ The -r option causes the selected hash table to be emptied. It
+ will be subsequently rebuilt in the normal fashion. The -f
+ option causes the selected hash table to be fully rebuilt imme-
+ diately. For the command hash table this hashes all the abso-
+ lute directories in the PATH, and for the named directory hash
+ table this adds all users' home directories. These two options
+ cannot be used with any arguments.
+
+ The -m option causes the arguments to be taken as patterns
+ (which should be quoted) and the elements of the hash table
+ matching those patterns are printed. This is the only way to
+ display a limited selection of hash table elements.
+
+ For each name with a corresponding value, put `name' in the
+ selected hash table, associating it with the pathname `value'.
+ In the command hash table, this means that whenever `name' is
+ used as a command argument, the shell will try to execute the
+ file given by `value'. In the named directory hash table, this
+ means that `value' may be referred to as `~name'.
+
+ For each name with no corresponding value, attempt to add name
+ to the hash table, checking what the appropriate value is in the
+ normal manner for that hash table. If an appropriate value
+ can't be found, then the hash table will be unchanged.
+
+ The -v option causes hash table entries to be listed as they are
+ added by explicit specification. If has no effect if used with
+ -f.
+
+ If the -L flag is present, then each hash table entry is printed
+ in the form of a call to hash.
+
+rehash Same as hash -r.
View
94 .zsh/help/history
@@ -0,0 +1,94 @@
+fc [ -e ename ] [ -m match ] [ old=new ... ] [ first [ last ] ]
+fc -l [ -nrdfEiD ] [ -t timefmt ] [ -m match ]
+ [ old=new ... ] [ first [ last ] ]
+fc -p [ -a ] [ filename [ histsize [ savehistsize ] ] ]
+fc -P
+fc -ARWI [ filename ]
+ Select a range of commands from first to last from the history
+ list. The arguments first and last may be specified as a number
+ or as a string. A negative number is used as an offset to the
+ current history event number. A string specifies the most
+ recent event beginning with the given string. All substitutions
+ old=new, if any, are then performed on the commands.
+
+ If the -l flag is given, the resulting commands are listed on
+ standard output. If the -m flag is also given the first argu-
+ ment is taken as a pattern (should be quoted) and only the his-
+ tory events matching this pattern will be shown. Otherwise the
+ editor program ename is invoked on a file containing these his-
+ tory events. If ename is not given, the value of the parameter
+ FCEDIT is used; if that is not set the value of the parameter
+ EDITOR is used; if that is not set a builtin default, usually
+ `vi' is used. If ename is `-', no editor is invoked. When
+ editing is complete, the edited command is executed.
+
+ If first is not specified, it will be set to -1 (the most recent
+ event), or to -16 if the -l flag is given. If last is not spec-
+ ified, it will be set to first, or to -1 if the -l flag is
+ given.
+
+ The flag -r reverses the order of the commands and the flag -n
+ suppresses command numbers when listing.
+
+ Also when listing,
+ -d prints timestamps for each command
+ -f prints full time-date stamps in the US `MM/DD/YY hh:mm'
+ format
+ -E prints full time-date stamps in the European `dd.mm.yyyy
+ hh:mm' format
+ -i prints full time-date stamps in ISO8601 `yyyy-mm-dd
+ hh:mm' format
+ -t fmt prints time and date stamps in the given format; fmt is
+ formatted with the strftime function with the zsh exten-
+ sions described for the %D{string} prompt format in the
+ section EXPANSION OF PROMPT SEQUENCES in zshmisc(1). The
+ resulting formatted string must be no more than 256 char-
+ acters or will not be printed.
+ -D prints elapsed times; may be combined with one of the
+ options above.
+
+ `fc -p' pushes the current history list onto a stack and
+ switches to a new history list. If the -a option is also speci-
+ fied, this history list will be automatically popped when the
+ current function scope is exited, which is a much better solu-
+ tion than creating a trap function to call `fc -P' manually. If
+ no arguments are specified, the history list is left empty,
+ $HISTFILE is unset, and $HISTSIZE & $SAVEHIST are set to their
+ default values. If one argument is given, $HISTFILE is set to
+ that filename, $HISTSIZE & $SAVEHIST are left unchanged, and the
+ history file is read in (if it exists) to initialize the new
+ list. If a second argument is specified, $HISTSIZE & $SAVEHIST
+ are instead set to the single specified numeric value. Finally,
+ if a third argument is specified, $SAVEHIST is set to a separate
+ value from $HISTSIZE. You are free to change these environment
+ values for the new history list however you desire in order to
+ manipulate the new history list.
+
+ `fc -P' pops the history list back to an older list saved by `fc
+ -p'. The current list is saved to its $HISTFILE before it is
+ destroyed (assuming that $HISTFILE and $SAVEHIST are set appro-
+ priately, of course). The values of $HISTFILE, $HISTSIZE, and
+ $SAVEHIST are restored to the values they had when `fc -p' was
+ called. Note that this restoration can conflict with making
+ these variables "local", so your best bet is to avoid local dec-
+ larations for these variables in functions that use `fc -p'.
+ The one other guaranteed-safe combination is declaring these
+ variables to be local at the top of your function and using the
+ automatic option (-a) with `fc -p'. Finally, note that it is
+ legal to manually pop a push marked for automatic popping if you
+ need to do so before the function exits.
+
+ `fc -R' reads the history from the given file, `fc -W' writes
+ the history out to the given file, and `fc -A' appends the his-
+ tory out to the given file. If no filename is specified, the
+ $HISTFILE is assumed. If the -I option is added to -R, only
+ those events that are not already contained within the internal
+ history list are added. If the -I option is added to -A or -W,
+ only those events that are new since last incremental
+ append/write to the history file are appended/written. In any
+ case, the created file will have no more than $SAVEHIST entries.
+
+history
+ Same as fc -l.
+
+r Same as fc -e -.
View
252 .zsh/help/integer
@@ -0,0 +1,252 @@
+typeset [ {+|-}AEFHUafghklprtuxmz ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+typeset -T [ {+|-}Urux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] SCALAR[=value] array [ sep ]
+ Set or display attributes and values for shell parameters.
+
+ A parameter is created for each name that does not already refer
+ to one. When inside a function, a new parameter is created for
+ every name (even those that already exist), and is unset again
+ when the function completes. See `Local Parameters' in zsh-
+ param(1). The same rules apply to special shell parameters,
+ which retain their special attributes when made local.
+
+ For each name=value assignment, the parameter name is set to
+ value. Note that arrays currently cannot be assigned in typeset
+ expressions, only scalars and integers. Unless the option
+ KSH TYPESET is set, normal expansion rules apply to assignment
+ arguments, so value may be split into separate words; if the
+ option is set, assignments which can be recognised when expan-
+ sion is performed are treated as single words. For example the
+ command typeset vbl=$(echo one two) is treated as having one
+ argument if KSH TYPESET is set, but otherwise is treated as hav-
+ ing the two arguments vbl=one and two.
+
+ If the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not set, for each remain-
+ ing name that refers to a parameter that is set, the name and
+ value of the parameter are printed in the form of an assignment.
+ Nothing is printed for newly-created parameters, or when any
+ attribute flags listed below are given along with the name.
+ Using `+' instead of minus to introduce an attribute turns it
+ off.
+
+ If the -p option is given, parameters and values are printed in
+ the form of a typeset command and an assignment (which will be
+ printed separately for arrays and associative arrays), regard-
+ less of other flags and options. Note that the -h flag on
+ parameters is respected; no value will be shown for these param-
+ eters.
+
+ If the -T option is given, two or three arguments must be
+ present (an exception is that zero arguments are allowed to show
+ the list of parameters created in this fashion). The first two
+ are the name of a scalar and an array parameter (in that order)
+ that will be tied together in the manner of $PATH and $path.
+ The optional third argument is a single-character separator
+ which will be used to join the elements of the array to form the
+ scalar; if absent, a colon is used, as with $PATH. Only the
+ first character of the separator is significant; any remaining
+ characters are ignored. Only the scalar parameter may be
+ assigned an initial value. Both the scalar and the array may
+ otherwise be manipulated as normal. If one is unset, the other
+ will automatically be unset too. There is no way of untying the
+ variables without unsetting them, or converting the type of one
+ of them with another typeset command; +T does not work, assign-
+ ing an array to SCALAR is an error, and assigning a scalar to
+ array sets it to be a single-element array. Note that both
+ `typeset -xT ...' and `export -T ...' work, but only the scalar
+ will be marked for export. Setting the value using the scalar
+ version causes a split on all separators (which cannot be
+ quoted).
+
+ The -g (global) flag is treated specially: it means that any
+ resulting parameter will not be restricted to local scope. Note
+ that this does not necessarily mean that the parameter will be
+ global, as the flag will apply to any existing parameter (even
+ if unset) from an enclosing function. This flag does not affect
+ the parameter after creation, hence it has no effect when list-
+ ing existing parameters, nor does the flag +g have any effect
+ except in combination with -m (see below).
+
+ If no name is present, the names and values of all parameters
+ are printed. In this case the attribute flags restrict the dis-
+ play to only those parameters that have the specified
+ attributes, and using `+' rather than `-' to introduce the flag
+ suppresses printing of the values of parameters when there is no
+ parameter name. Also, if the last option is the word `+', then
+ names are printed but values are not.
+
+ If the -m flag is given the name arguments are taken as patterns
+ (which should be quoted). With no attribute flags, all parame-
+ ters (or functions with the -f flag) with matching names are
+ printed (the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not used in this
+ case). Note that -m is ignored if no patterns are given. If
+ the +g flag is combined with -m, a new local parameter is cre-
+ ated for every matching parameter that is not already local.
+ Otherwise -m applies all other flags or assignments to the
+ existing parameters. Except when assignments are made with
+ name=value, using +m forces the matching parameters to be
+ printed, even inside a function.
+
+ If no attribute flags are given and either no -m flag is present
+ or the +m form was used, each parameter name printed is preceded
+ by a list of the attributes of that parameter (array, associa-
+ tion, exported, integer, readonly). If +m is used with
+ attribute flags, and all those flags are introduced with +, the
+ matching parameter names are printed but their values are not.
+
+ Attribute flags that transform the final value (-L, -R, -Z, -l,
+ u) are only applied to the expanded value at the point of a
+ parameter expansion expression using `$'. They are not applied
+ when a parameter is retrieved internally by the shell for any
+ purpose.
+
+ The following attribute flags may be specified:
+
+ -A The names refer to associative array parameters; see
+ `Array Parameters' in zshparam(1).
+
+ -L Left justify and remove leading blanks from value. If n
+ is nonzero, it defines the width of the field. If n is
+ zero, the width is determined by the width of the value
+ of the first assignment. In the case of numeric parame-
+ ters, the length of the complete value assigned to the
+ parameter is used to determine the width, not the value
+ that would be output.
+
+ The width is the count of characters, which may be multi-
+ byte characters if the MULTIBYTE option is in effect.
+ Note that the screen width of the character is not taken
+ into account; if this is required, use padding with
+ parameter expansion flags ${(ml...)...} as described in
+ `Parameter Expansion Flags' in zshexpn(1).
+
+ When the parameter is expanded, it is filled on the right
+ with blanks or truncated if necessary to fit the field.
+ Note truncation can lead to unexpected results with
+ numeric parameters. Leading zeros are removed if the -Z
+ flag is also set.
+
+ -R Similar to -L, except that right justification is used;
+ when the parameter is expanded, the field is left filled
+ with blanks or truncated from the end. May not be com-
+ bined with the -Z flag.
+
+ -U For arrays (but not for associative arrays), keep only
+ the first occurrence of each duplicated value. This may
+ also be set for colon-separated special parameters like
+ PATH or FIGNORE, etc. This flag has a different meaning
+ when used with -f; see below.
+
+ -Z Specially handled if set along with the -L flag. Other-
+ wise, similar to -R, except that leading zeros are used
+ for padding instead of blanks if the first non-blank
+ character is a digit. Numeric parameters are specially
+ handled: they are always eligible for padding with
+ zeroes, and the zeroes are inserted at an appropriate
+ place in the output.
+
+ -a The names refer to array parameters. An array parameter
+ may be created this way, but it may not be assigned to in
+ the typeset statement. When displaying, both normal and
+ associative arrays are shown.
+
+ -f The names refer to functions rather than parameters. No
+ assignments can be made, and the only other valid flags
+ are -t, -k, -u, -U and -z. The flag -t turns on execu-
+ tion tracing for this function. The -u and -U flags
+ cause the function to be marked for autoloading; -U also
+ causes alias expansion to be suppressed when the function
+ is loaded. The fpath parameter will be searched to find
+ the function definition when the function is first refer-
+ enced; see the section `Functions'. The -k and -z flags
+ make the function be loaded using ksh-style or zsh-style
+ autoloading respectively. If neither is given, the set-
+ ting of the KSH AUTOLOAD option determines how the func-
+ tion is loaded.
+
+ -h Hide: only useful for special parameters (those marked
+ `<S>' in the table in zshparam(1)), and for local parame-
+ ters with the same name as a special parameter, though
+ harmless for others. A special parameter with this
+ attribute will not retain its special effect when made
+ local. Thus after `typeset -h PATH', a function contain-
+ ing `typeset PATH' will create an ordinary local parame-
+ ter without the usual behaviour of PATH. Alternatively,
+ the local parameter may itself be given this attribute;
+ hence inside a function `typeset -h PATH' creates an
+ ordinary local parameter and the special PATH parameter
+ is not altered in any way. It is also possible to create
+ a local parameter using `typeset +h special', where the
+ local copy of special will retain its special properties
+ regardless of having the -h attribute. Global special
+ parameters loaded from shell modules (currently those in
+ zsh/mapfile and zsh/parameter) are automatically given
+ the -h attribute to avoid name clashes.
+
+ -H Hide value: specifies that typeset will not display the
+ value of the parameter when listing parameters; the dis-
+ play for such parameters is always as if the `+' flag had
+ been given. Use of the parameter is in other respects
+ normal, and the option does not apply if the parameter is
+ specified by name, or by pattern with the -m option.
+ This is on by default for the parameters in the
+ zsh/parameter and zsh/mapfile modules. Note, however,
+ that unlike the -h flag this is also useful for non-spe-
+ cial parameters.
+
+ -i Use an internal integer representation. If n is nonzero
+ it defines the output arithmetic base, otherwise it is
+ determined by the first assignment. Bases from 2 to 36
+ inclusive are allowed.
+
+ -E Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to sci-
+ entific notation. If n is nonzero it defines the number
+ of significant figures to display; the default is ten.
+
+ -F Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to
+ fixed-point decimal notation. If n is nonzero it defines
+ the number of digits to display after the decimal point;
+ the default is ten.
+
+ -l Convert the result to lower case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+
+ -r The given names are marked readonly. Note that if name
+ is a special parameter, the readonly attribute can be
+ turned on, but cannot then be turned off.
+
+ -t Tags the named parameters. Tags have no special meaning
+ to the shell. This flag has a different meaning when
+ used with -f; see above.
+
+ -u Convert the result to upper case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+ This flag has a different meaning when used with -f; see
+ above.
+
+ -x Mark for automatic export to the environment of subse-
+ quently executed commands. If the option GLOBAL EXPORT
+ is set, this implies the option -g, unless +g is also
+ explicitly given; in other words the parameter is not
+ made local to the enclosing function. This is for com-
+ patibility with previous versions of zsh.
+
+declare
+ Same as typeset.
+
+float [ {+|-}EFHghlprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -E, except that options irrelevant to
+ floating point numbers are not permitted.
+
+integer [ {+|-}Hghilprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -i, except that options irrelevant to
+ integers are not permitted.
+
+local [ {+|-}AEFHUahlprtux ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ] ...
+ Same as typeset, except that the options -g, and -f are not per-
+ mitted. In this case the -x option does not force the use of
+ -g, i.e. exported variables will be local to functions.
+
+readonly
+ Same as typeset -r.
View
14 .zsh/help/jobs
@@ -0,0 +1,14 @@
+jobs [ -dlprs ] [ job ... ]
+jobs -Z string
+ Lists information about each given job, or all jobs if job is
+ omitted. The -l flag lists process IDs, and the -p flag lists
+ process groups. If the -r flag is specified only running jobs
+ will be listed and if the -s flag is given only stopped jobs are
+ shown. If the -d flag is given, the directory from which the
+ job was started (which may not be the current directory of the
+ job) will also be shown.
+
+ The -Z option replaces the shell's argument and environment
+ space with the given string, truncated if necessary to fit.
+ This will normally be visible in ps (ps(1)) listings. This fea-
+ ture is typically used by daemons, to indicate their state.
View
24 .zsh/help/kill
@@ -0,0 +1,24 @@
+kill [ -s signal name | -n signal number | -sig ] job ...
+kill -l [ sig ... ]
+ Sends either SIGTERM or the specified signal to the given jobs
+ or processes. Signals are given by number or by names, with or
+ without the `SIG' prefix. If the signal being sent is not
+ `KILL' or `CONT', then the job will be sent a `CONT' signal if
+ it is stopped. The argument job can be the process ID of a job
+ not in the job list. In the second form, kill -l, if sig is not
+ specified the signal names are listed. Otherwise, for each sig
+ that is a name, the corresponding signal number is listed. For
+ each sig that is a signal number or a number representing the
+ exit status of a process which was terminated or stopped by a
+ signal the name of the signal is printed.
+
+ On some systems, alternative signal names are allowed for a few
+ signals. Typical examples are SIGCHLD and SIGCLD or SIGPOLL and
+ SIGIO, assuming they correspond to the same signal number. kill
+ -l will only list the preferred form, however kill -l alt will
+ show if the alternative form corresponds to a signal number.
+ For example, under Linux kill -l IO and kill -l POLL both output
+ 29, hence kill -IO and kill -POLL have the same effect.
+
+ Many systems will allow process IDs to be negative to kill a
+ process group or zero to kill the current process group.
View
6 .zsh/help/let
@@ -0,0 +1,6 @@
+let arg ...
+ Evaluate each arg as an arithmetic expression. See the section
+ `Arithmetic Evaluation' in zshmisc(1) for a description of
+ arithmetic expressions. The exit status is 0 if the value of
+ the last expression is nonzero, 1 if it is zero, and 2 if an
+ error occurred.
View
82 .zsh/help/limit
@@ -0,0 +1,82 @@
+limit [ -hs ] [ resource [ limit ] ] ...
+ Set or display resource limits. Unless the -s flag is given,
+ the limit applies only the children of the shell. If -s is
+ given without other arguments, the resource limits of the cur-
+ rent shell is set to the previously set resource limits of the
+ children.
+
+ If limit is not specified, print the current limit placed on
+ resource, otherwise set the limit to the specified value. If
+ the -h flag is given, use hard limits instead of soft limits.
+ If no resource is given, print all limits.
+
+ When looping over multiple resources, the shell will abort imme-
+ diately if it detects a badly formed argument. However, if it
+ fails to set a limit for some other reason it will continue try-
+ ing to set the remaining limits.
+
+ resource can be one of:
+
+ addressspace
+ Maximum amount of address space used.
+ aiomemorylocked
+ Maximum amount of memory locked in RAM for AIO opera-
+ tions.
+ aiooperations
+ Maximum number of AIO operations.
+ cachedthreads
+ Maximum number of cached threads.
+ coredumpsize
+ Maximum size of a core dump.
+ cputime
+ Maximum CPU seconds per process.
+ datasize
+ Maximum data size (including stack) for each process.
+ descriptors
+ Maximum value for a file descriptor.
+ filesize
+ Largest single file allowed.
+ maxproc
+ Maximum number of processes.
+ maxpthreads
+ Maximum number of threads per process.
+ memorylocked
+ Maximum amount of memory locked in RAM.
+ memoryuse
+ Maximum resident set size.
+ msgqueue
+ Maximum number of bytes in POSIX message queues.
+ resident
+ Maximum resident set size.
+ sigpending
+ Maximum number of pending signals.
+ sockbufsize
+ Maximum size of all socket buffers.
+ stacksize
+ Maximum stack size for each process.
+ vmemorysize
+ Maximum amount of virtual memory.
+
+ Which of these resource limits are available depends on the sys-
+ tem. resource can be abbreviated to any unambiguous prefix. It
+ can also be an integer, which corresponds to the integer defined
+ for the resource by the operating system.
+
+ If argument corresponds to a number which is out of the range of
+ the resources configured into the shell, the shell will try to
+ read or write the limit anyway, and will report an error if this
+ fails. As the shell does not store such resources internally,
+ an attempt to set the limit will fail unless the -s option is
+ present.
+
+ limit is a number, with an optional scaling factor, as follows:
+
+ nh hours
+ nk kilobytes (default)
+ nm megabytes or minutes
+ [mm:]ss
+ minutes and seconds
+
+ The limit command is not made available by default when the
+ shell starts in a mode emulating another shell. It can be made
+ available with the command `zmodload -F zsh/rlimits b:limit'.
View
252 .zsh/help/local
@@ -0,0 +1,252 @@
+typeset [ {+|-}AEFHUafghklprtuxmz ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+typeset -T [ {+|-}Urux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] SCALAR[=value] array [ sep ]
+ Set or display attributes and values for shell parameters.
+
+ A parameter is created for each name that does not already refer
+ to one. When inside a function, a new parameter is created for
+ every name (even those that already exist), and is unset again
+ when the function completes. See `Local Parameters' in zsh-
+ param(1). The same rules apply to special shell parameters,
+ which retain their special attributes when made local.
+
+ For each name=value assignment, the parameter name is set to
+ value. Note that arrays currently cannot be assigned in typeset
+ expressions, only scalars and integers. Unless the option
+ KSH TYPESET is set, normal expansion rules apply to assignment
+ arguments, so value may be split into separate words; if the
+ option is set, assignments which can be recognised when expan-
+ sion is performed are treated as single words. For example the
+ command typeset vbl=$(echo one two) is treated as having one
+ argument if KSH TYPESET is set, but otherwise is treated as hav-
+ ing the two arguments vbl=one and two.
+
+ If the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not set, for each remain-
+ ing name that refers to a parameter that is set, the name and
+ value of the parameter are printed in the form of an assignment.
+ Nothing is printed for newly-created parameters, or when any
+ attribute flags listed below are given along with the name.
+ Using `+' instead of minus to introduce an attribute turns it
+ off.
+
+ If the -p option is given, parameters and values are printed in
+ the form of a typeset command and an assignment (which will be
+ printed separately for arrays and associative arrays), regard-
+ less of other flags and options. Note that the -h flag on
+ parameters is respected; no value will be shown for these param-
+ eters.
+
+ If the -T option is given, two or three arguments must be
+ present (an exception is that zero arguments are allowed to show
+ the list of parameters created in this fashion). The first two
+ are the name of a scalar and an array parameter (in that order)
+ that will be tied together in the manner of $PATH and $path.
+ The optional third argument is a single-character separator
+ which will be used to join the elements of the array to form the
+ scalar; if absent, a colon is used, as with $PATH. Only the
+ first character of the separator is significant; any remaining
+ characters are ignored. Only the scalar parameter may be
+ assigned an initial value. Both the scalar and the array may
+ otherwise be manipulated as normal. If one is unset, the other
+ will automatically be unset too. There is no way of untying the
+ variables without unsetting them, or converting the type of one
+ of them with another typeset command; +T does not work, assign-
+ ing an array to SCALAR is an error, and assigning a scalar to
+ array sets it to be a single-element array. Note that both
+ `typeset -xT ...' and `export -T ...' work, but only the scalar
+ will be marked for export. Setting the value using the scalar
+ version causes a split on all separators (which cannot be
+ quoted).
+
+ The -g (global) flag is treated specially: it means that any
+ resulting parameter will not be restricted to local scope. Note
+ that this does not necessarily mean that the parameter will be
+ global, as the flag will apply to any existing parameter (even
+ if unset) from an enclosing function. This flag does not affect
+ the parameter after creation, hence it has no effect when list-
+ ing existing parameters, nor does the flag +g have any effect
+ except in combination with -m (see below).
+
+ If no name is present, the names and values of all parameters
+ are printed. In this case the attribute flags restrict the dis-
+ play to only those parameters that have the specified
+ attributes, and using `+' rather than `-' to introduce the flag
+ suppresses printing of the values of parameters when there is no
+ parameter name. Also, if the last option is the word `+', then
+ names are printed but values are not.
+
+ If the -m flag is given the name arguments are taken as patterns
+ (which should be quoted). With no attribute flags, all parame-
+ ters (or functions with the -f flag) with matching names are
+ printed (the shell option TYPESET SILENT is not used in this
+ case). Note that -m is ignored if no patterns are given. If
+ the +g flag is combined with -m, a new local parameter is cre-
+ ated for every matching parameter that is not already local.
+ Otherwise -m applies all other flags or assignments to the
+ existing parameters. Except when assignments are made with
+ name=value, using +m forces the matching parameters to be
+ printed, even inside a function.
+
+ If no attribute flags are given and either no -m flag is present
+ or the +m form was used, each parameter name printed is preceded
+ by a list of the attributes of that parameter (array, associa-
+ tion, exported, integer, readonly). If +m is used with
+ attribute flags, and all those flags are introduced with +, the
+ matching parameter names are printed but their values are not.
+
+ Attribute flags that transform the final value (-L, -R, -Z, -l,
+ u) are only applied to the expanded value at the point of a
+ parameter expansion expression using `$'. They are not applied
+ when a parameter is retrieved internally by the shell for any
+ purpose.
+
+ The following attribute flags may be specified:
+
+ -A The names refer to associative array parameters; see
+ `Array Parameters' in zshparam(1).
+
+ -L Left justify and remove leading blanks from value. If n
+ is nonzero, it defines the width of the field. If n is
+ zero, the width is determined by the width of the value
+ of the first assignment. In the case of numeric parame-
+ ters, the length of the complete value assigned to the
+ parameter is used to determine the width, not the value
+ that would be output.
+
+ The width is the count of characters, which may be multi-
+ byte characters if the MULTIBYTE option is in effect.
+ Note that the screen width of the character is not taken
+ into account; if this is required, use padding with
+ parameter expansion flags ${(ml...)...} as described in
+ `Parameter Expansion Flags' in zshexpn(1).
+
+ When the parameter is expanded, it is filled on the right
+ with blanks or truncated if necessary to fit the field.
+ Note truncation can lead to unexpected results with
+ numeric parameters. Leading zeros are removed if the -Z
+ flag is also set.
+
+ -R Similar to -L, except that right justification is used;
+ when the parameter is expanded, the field is left filled
+ with blanks or truncated from the end. May not be com-
+ bined with the -Z flag.
+
+ -U For arrays (but not for associative arrays), keep only
+ the first occurrence of each duplicated value. This may
+ also be set for colon-separated special parameters like
+ PATH or FIGNORE, etc. This flag has a different meaning
+ when used with -f; see below.
+
+ -Z Specially handled if set along with the -L flag. Other-
+ wise, similar to -R, except that leading zeros are used
+ for padding instead of blanks if the first non-blank
+ character is a digit. Numeric parameters are specially
+ handled: they are always eligible for padding with
+ zeroes, and the zeroes are inserted at an appropriate
+ place in the output.
+
+ -a The names refer to array parameters. An array parameter
+ may be created this way, but it may not be assigned to in
+ the typeset statement. When displaying, both normal and
+ associative arrays are shown.
+
+ -f The names refer to functions rather than parameters. No
+ assignments can be made, and the only other valid flags
+ are -t, -k, -u, -U and -z. The flag -t turns on execu-
+ tion tracing for this function. The -u and -U flags
+ cause the function to be marked for autoloading; -U also
+ causes alias expansion to be suppressed when the function
+ is loaded. The fpath parameter will be searched to find
+ the function definition when the function is first refer-
+ enced; see the section `Functions'. The -k and -z flags
+ make the function be loaded using ksh-style or zsh-style
+ autoloading respectively. If neither is given, the set-
+ ting of the KSH AUTOLOAD option determines how the func-
+ tion is loaded.
+
+ -h Hide: only useful for special parameters (those marked
+ `<S>' in the table in zshparam(1)), and for local parame-
+ ters with the same name as a special parameter, though
+ harmless for others. A special parameter with this
+ attribute will not retain its special effect when made
+ local. Thus after `typeset -h PATH', a function contain-
+ ing `typeset PATH' will create an ordinary local parame-
+ ter without the usual behaviour of PATH. Alternatively,
+ the local parameter may itself be given this attribute;
+ hence inside a function `typeset -h PATH' creates an
+ ordinary local parameter and the special PATH parameter
+ is not altered in any way. It is also possible to create
+ a local parameter using `typeset +h special', where the
+ local copy of special will retain its special properties
+ regardless of having the -h attribute. Global special
+ parameters loaded from shell modules (currently those in
+ zsh/mapfile and zsh/parameter) are automatically given
+ the -h attribute to avoid name clashes.
+
+ -H Hide value: specifies that typeset will not display the
+ value of the parameter when listing parameters; the dis-
+ play for such parameters is always as if the `+' flag had
+ been given. Use of the parameter is in other respects
+ normal, and the option does not apply if the parameter is
+ specified by name, or by pattern with the -m option.
+ This is on by default for the parameters in the
+ zsh/parameter and zsh/mapfile modules. Note, however,
+ that unlike the -h flag this is also useful for non-spe-
+ cial parameters.
+
+ -i Use an internal integer representation. If n is nonzero
+ it defines the output arithmetic base, otherwise it is
+ determined by the first assignment. Bases from 2 to 36
+ inclusive are allowed.
+
+ -E Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to sci-
+ entific notation. If n is nonzero it defines the number
+ of significant figures to display; the default is ten.
+
+ -F Use an internal double-precision floating point represen-
+ tation. On output the variable will be converted to
+ fixed-point decimal notation. If n is nonzero it defines
+ the number of digits to display after the decimal point;
+ the default is ten.
+
+ -l Convert the result to lower case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+
+ -r The given names are marked readonly. Note that if name
+ is a special parameter, the readonly attribute can be
+ turned on, but cannot then be turned off.
+
+ -t Tags the named parameters. Tags have no special meaning
+ to the shell. This flag has a different meaning when
+ used with -f; see above.
+
+ -u Convert the result to upper case whenever the parameter
+ is expanded. The value is not converted when assigned.
+ This flag has a different meaning when used with -f; see
+ above.
+
+ -x Mark for automatic export to the environment of subse-
+ quently executed commands. If the option GLOBAL EXPORT
+ is set, this implies the option -g, unless +g is also
+ explicitly given; in other words the parameter is not
+ made local to the enclosing function. This is for com-
+ patibility with previous versions of zsh.
+
+declare
+ Same as typeset.
+
+float [ {+|-}EFHghlprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -E, except that options irrelevant to
+ floating point numbers are not permitted.
+
+integer [ {+|-}Hghilprtux ] [ -LRZ [ n ]] [ name[=value] ... ]
+ Equivalent to typeset -i, except that options irrelevant to
+ integers are not permitted.
+
+local [ {+|-}AEFHUahlprtux ] [ -LRZi [ n ]] [ name[=value] ] ...
+ Same as typeset, except that the options -g, and -f are not per-
+ mitted. In this case the -x option does not force the use of
+ -g, i.e. exported variables will be local to functions.
+
+readonly
+ Same as typeset -r.
View
2  .zsh/help/log
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+log List all users currently logged in who are affected by the cur-
+ rent setting of the watch parameter.
View
10 .zsh/help/logout
@@ -0,0 +1,10 @@
+exit [ n ]
+ Exit the shell with the exit status specified by n; if none is
+ specified, use the exit status from the last command executed.
+ An EOF condition will also cause the shell to exit, unless the
+ IGNORE EOF option is set.
+
+bye Same as exit.
+
+logout [ n ]
+ Same as exit, except that it only works in a login shell.
View
2  .zsh/help/noglob
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+noglob simple command
+ See the section `Precommand Modifiers'.
View
14 .zsh/help/popd
@@ -0,0 +1,14 @@
+popd [ [-q] {+|-}n ]
+ Remove an entry from the directory stack, and perform a cd to
+ the new top directory. With no argument, the current top entry
+ is removed. An argument of the form `+n' identifies a stack
+ entry by counting from the left of the list shown by the dirs
+ command, starting with zero. An argument of the form -n counts
+ from the right. If the PUSHD MINUS option is set, the meanings
+ of `+' and `-' in this context are swapped.
+
+ If the -q (quiet) option is specified, the hook function chpwd
+ and the functions in the array $chpwd functions are not called,
+ and the new directory stack is not printed. This is useful for
+ calls to popd that do not change the environment seen by an
+ interactive user.
View
74 .zsh/help/print
@@ -0,0 +1,74 @@
+print [ -abcDilmnNoOpPrsz ] [ -u n ] [ -f format ] [ -C cols ]
+ [ -R [ -en ]] [ arg ... ]
+ With the `-f' option the arguments are printed as described by
+ printf. With no flags or with the flag `-', the arguments are
+ printed on the standard output as described by echo, with the
+ following differences: the escape sequence `\M-x' metafies the
+ character x (sets the highest bit), `\C-x' produces a control
+ character (`\C-@' and `\C-?' give the characters NUL and
+ delete), and `\E' is a synonym for `\e'. Finally, if not in an
+ escape sequence, `\' escapes the following character and is not
+ printed.
+
+ -a Print arguments with the column incrementing first. Only
+ useful with the -c and -C options.
+
+ -b Recognize all the escape sequences defined for the bind-
+ key command, see zshzle(1).
+
+ -c Print the arguments in columns. Unless -a is also given,
+ arguments are printed with the row incrementing first.
+
+ -C cols
+ Print the arguments in cols columns. Unless -a is also
+ given, arguments are printed with the row incrementing
+ first.
+
+ -D Treat the arguments as directory names, replacing pre-
+ fixes with ~ expressions, as appropriate.
+
+ -i If given together with -o or -O, sorting is performed
+ case-independently.
+
+ -l Print the arguments separated by newlines instead of spa-
+ ces.
+
+ -m Take the first argument as a pattern (should be quoted),
+ and remove it from the argument list together with subse-
+ quent arguments that do not match this pattern.
+
+ -n Do not add a newline to the output.
+
+ -N Print the arguments separated and terminated by nulls.
+
+ -o Print the arguments sorted in ascending order.
+
+ -O Print the arguments sorted in descending order.
+
+ -p Print the arguments to the input of the coprocess.
+
+ -P Perform prompt expansion (see EXPANSION OF PROMPT
+ SEQUENCES in zshmisc(1)).
+
+ -r Ignore the escape conventions of echo.
+
+ -R Emulate the BSD echo command, which does not process
+ escape sequences unless the -e flag is given. The -n
+ flag suppresses the trailing newline. Only the -e and -n
+ flags are recognized after -R; all other arguments and
+ options are printed.
+
+ -s Place the results in the history list instead of on the
+ standard output.
+
+ -u n Print the arguments to file descriptor n.
+
+ -z Push the arguments onto the editing buffer stack, sepa-
+ rated by spaces.
+
+ If any of `-m', `-o' or `-O' are used in combination with `-f'
+ and there are no arguments (after the removal process in the
+ case of `-m') then nothing is printed.
+
+pushln [ arg ... ]
+ Equivalent to print -nz.
View
30 .zsh/help/printf
@@ -0,0 +1,30 @@
+printf format [ arg ... ]
+ Print the arguments according to the format specification. For-
+ matting rules are the same as used in C. The same escape
+ sequences as for echo are recognised in the format. All C con-
+ version specifications ending in one of csdiouxXeEfgGn are han-
+ dled. In addition to this, `%b' can be used instead of `%s' to
+ cause escape sequences in the argument to be recognised and `%q'
+ can be used to quote the argument in such a way that allows it
+ to be reused as shell input. With the numeric format specifiers,
+ if the corresponding argument starts with a quote character, the
+ numeric value of the following character is used as the number
+ to print otherwise the argument is evaluated as an arithmetic
+ expression. See the section `Arithmetic Evaluation' in zsh-
+ misc(1) for a description of arithmetic expressions. With `%n',
+ the corresponding argument is taken as an identifier which is
+ created as an integer parameter.
+
+ Normally, conversion specifications are applied to each argument
+ in order but they can explicitly specify the nth argument is to
+ be used by replacing `%' by `%n$' and `*' by `*n$'. It is rec-
+ ommended that you do not mix references of this explicit style
+ with the normal style and the handling of such mixed styles may
+ be subject to future change.
+
+ If arguments remain unused after formatting, the format string
+ is reused until all arguments have been consumed. With the print
+ builtin, this can be suppressed by using the -r option. If more
+ arguments are required by the format than have been specified,
+ the behaviour is as if zero or an empty string had been speci-
+ fied as the argument.
View
31 .zsh/help/pushd
@@ -0,0 +1,31 @@
+pushd [ -qsLP ] [ arg ]
+pushd [ -qsLP ] old new
+pushd [ -qsLP ] {+|-}n
+ Change the current directory, and push the old current directory
+ onto the directory stack. In the first form, change the current
+ directory to arg. If arg is not specified, change to the second
+ directory on the stack (that is, exchange the top two entries),
+ or change to $HOME if the PUSHD TO HOME option is set or if
+ there is only one entry on the stack. Otherwise, arg is inter-
+ preted as it would be by cd. The meaning of old and new in the
+ second form is also the same as for cd.
+
+ The third form of pushd changes directory by rotating the direc-
+ tory list. An argument of the form `+n' identifies a stack
+ entry by counting from the left of the list shown by the dirs
+ command, starting with zero. An argument of the form `-n'
+ counts from the right. If the PUSHD MINUS option is set, the
+ meanings of `+' and `-' in this context are swapped.
+
+ If the -q (quiet) option is specified, the hook function chpwd
+ and the functions in the array $chpwd functions are not called,
+ and the new directory stack is not printed. This is useful for
+ calls to pushd that do not change the environment seen by an
+ interactive user.
+
+ If the option -q is not specified and the shell option
+ PUSHD SILENT is not set, the directory stack will be printed
+ after a pushd is performed.
+
+ The options -s, -L and -P have the same meanings as for the cd
+ builtin.