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Building OpenJDK Version 11 with OpenJ9

Our website describes a simple build process that uses Docker and Dockerfiles to create a build environment that contains everything you need to easily build a Linux binary of OpenJDK V11 with the Eclipse OpenJ9 virtual machine. A more complete set of build instructions are included here for multiple platforms:

User documentation for the latest release of Eclipse OpenJ9 is available at the Eclipse Foundation. If you build a binary from the current OpenJ9 source, new features and changes might be in place for the next release of OpenJ9. Draft user documentation for the next release of OpenJ9 can be found here.


Linux

🐧 This build process provides detailed instructions for building a Linux x86-64 binary of OpenJDK V11 with OpenJ9 on Ubuntu 16.04. The binary can be built directly on your system, in a virtual machine, or in a Docker container 🐳.

If you are using a different Linux distribution, you might have to review the list of libraries that are bundled with your distribution and/or modify the instructions to use equivalent commands to the Advanced Packaging Tool (APT). For example, for Centos, substitute the apt-get command with yum.

If you want to build a binary for Linux on a different architecture, such as Power Systems™ or z Systems™, the process is very similar and any additional information for those architectures are included as Notes 📝 as we go along. See AArch64 section for building for AArch64 Linux.

1. Prepare your system

🐧 Instructions are provided for preparing your system with and without the use of Docker technology.

Skip to Setting up your build environment without Docker.

Setting up your build environment with Docker 🐳

If you want to build a binary by using a Docker container, follow these steps to prepare your system:

  1. The first thing you need to do is install Docker. You can download the free Community edition from here, which also contains instructions for installing Docker on your system. You should also read the Getting started guide to familiarise yourself with the basic Docker concepts and terminology.

  2. Obtain the Linux on 64-bit x86 systems Dockerfile to build and run a container that has all the correct software pre-requisites.

    📝 Dockerfiles are also available for the following Linux architectures: Linux on 64-bit Power systems™ and Linux on 64-bit z Systems™

    Either download one of these Dockerfiles to your local system or copy and paste one of the following commands:

  • For Linux on 64-bit x86 systems, run:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/eclipse/openj9/master/buildenv/docker/jdk11/x86_64/ubuntu16/Dockerfile
  • For Linux on 64-bit Power systems, run:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/eclipse/openj9/master/buildenv/docker/jdk11/ppc64le/ubuntu16/Dockerfile
  • For Linux on 64-bit z Systems, run:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/eclipse/openj9/master/buildenv/docker/jdk11/s390x/ubuntu16/Dockerfile
  1. Next, run the following command to build a Docker image, called openj9:
docker build -t openj9 -f Dockerfile .
  1. Start a Docker container from the openj9 image with the following command, where -v maps any directory, <host_directory>, on your local system to the containers /root/hostdir directory so that you can store the binaries, once they are built:
docker run -v <host_directory>:/root/hostdir -it openj9

📝 Depending on your Docker system configuration, you might need to prefix the docker commands with sudo.

Now that you have the Docker image running, you are ready to move to the next step, Get the source.

Setting up your build environment without Docker

If you don't want to user Docker, you can still build an OpenJDK V11 with OpenJ9 directly on your Ubuntu system or in a Ubuntu virtual machine. Use the Linux on x86 Dockerfile like a recipe card to determine the software dependencies that must be installed on the system, plus a few configuration steps.

📝 Not on x86? We also have Dockerfiles for the following Linux architectures: Linux on Power systems and Linux on z Systems.

  1. Install the list of dependencies that can be obtained with the apt-get command from the following section of the Dockerfile:
apt-get update \
  && apt-get install -qq -y --no-install-recommends \
    gcc-7 \
    g++-7 \
    autoconf \
    ca-certificates \
    ...
  1. This build uses the same gcc and g++ compiler levels as OpenJDK, which might be backlevel compared with the versions you use on your system. Create links for the compilers with the following commands:
ln -s g++ /usr/bin/c++
ln -s g++-7 /usr/bin/g++
ln -s gcc /usr/bin/cc
ln -s gcc-7 /usr/bin/gcc
  1. Download and setup freemarker.jar into a directory.
cd /<my_home_dir>
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/freemarker/files/freemarker/2.3.8/freemarker-2.3.8.tar.gz/download -O freemarker.tgz
tar -xzf freemarker.tgz freemarker-2.3.8/lib/freemarker.jar --strip=2
rm -f freemarker.tgz
  1. Download and setup the boot JDK using the latest AdoptOpenJDK v11 build.
cd /<my_home_dir>
wget -O bootjdk11.tar.gz "https://api.adoptopenjdk.net/v2/binary/releases/openjdk11?openjdk_impl=openj9&os=linux&arch=x64&release=latest&type=jdk&heap_size=normal"
tar -xzf bootjdk11.tar.gz
rm -f bootjdk11.tar.gz
mv $(ls | grep -i jdk) bootjdk11

export JAVA_HOME="/<my_home_dir>/bootjdk11"
export PATH="${JAVA_HOME}/bin:${PATH}"

2. Get the source

🐧 First you need to clone the Extensions for OpenJDK for OpenJ9 project. This repository is a git mirror of OpenJDK without the HotSpot JVM, but with an openj9 branch that contains a few necessary patches. Run the following command:

git clone https://github.com/ibmruntimes/openj9-openjdk-jdk11.git

Cloning this repository can take a while because OpenJDK is a large project! When the process is complete, change directory into the cloned repository:

cd openj9-openjdk-jdk11

Now fetch additional sources from the Eclipse OpenJ9 project and its clone of Eclipse OMR:

bash get_source.sh

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 binary with OpenSSL support and you do not have a built version of OpenSSL v1.1.x available locally, you must specify --openssl-version=<version> where <version> is an OpenSSL level like 1.1.0 or 1.1.1. If the specified version of OpenSSL is already available in the standard location (SRC_DIR/openssl), get_source.sh uses it. Otherwise, the script deletes the content and downloads the specified version of OpenSSL source to the standard location and builds it. If you already have the version of OpenSSL in the standard location but you want a fresh copy, you must delete your current copy.

3. Configure

🐧 When you have all the source files that you need, run the configure script, which detects how to build in the current build environment.

bash configure --with-freemarker-jar=/<my_home_dir>/freemarker.jar

⚠️ You must give an absolute path to freemarker.jar

📝 Non-compressed references support: If you require a heap size greater than 57GB, enable a noncompressedrefs build with the --with-noncompressedrefs option during this step.

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK that includes OpenSSL, you must specify --with-openssl={fetched|system|path_to_library}

where:

  • fetched uses the OpenSSL source downloaded by get-source.sh in step 2. Get the source.
  • system uses the package installed OpenSSL library in the system.
  • path_to_library uses a custom OpenSSL library that's already built.

If you want to include the OpenSSL cryptographic library in the OpenJDK binary, you must include --enable-openssl-bundling.

4. Build

🐧 Now you're ready to build OpenJDK V11 with OpenJ9:

make all

⚠️ If you just type make, rather than make all your build will fail, because the default make target is exploded-image. If you want to specify make instead of make all, you must add --default-make-target=images when you run the configure script. For more information, read this issue.

A binary for the full developer kit (jdk) is built and stored in the following directory:

  • build/linux-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

    🐳 If you built your binaries in a Docker container, copy the binaries to the containers /root/hostdir directory so that you can access them on your local system. You'll find them in the directory you set for <host_directory> when you started your Docker container. See Setting up your build environment with Docker.

    📝 On other architectures the /jdk directory is in build/linux-ppc64le-normal-server-release/images (Linux on 64-bit Power systems) and build/linux-s390x-normal-server-release/images (Linux on 64-bit z Systems).

    📝 If you want a binary for the runtime environment (jre), you must run make legacy-jre-image, which produces a jre build in the build/linux-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jre directory.

5. Test

🐧 For a simple test, try running the java -version command. Change to the /jdk directory:

cd build/linux-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

Run:

./bin/java -version

Here is some sample output:

openjdk version "11-internal" 2018-09-25
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 11-internal+0-adhoc..jdk11)
Eclipse OpenJ9 VM (build master-ee517c1, JRE 11 Linux amd64-64-Bit Compressed References 20180910_000000 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
OpenJ9   - ee517c1
OMR      - f29d158
JCL      - 98f2038 based on jdk-11+28)

📝 OpenSSL support: If you built an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 that includes OpenSSL v1.1.x support, the following acknowledgements apply in accordance with the license terms:

  • This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/).
  • This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).

🐧 Congratulations! 🎉


AIX

📘

🚧 This section is still under construction. Further contributions expected.

The following instructions guide you through the process of building an OpenJDK V11 binary that contains Eclipse OpenJ9 on AIX 7.2.

1. Prepare your system

📘 You must install the following AIX Licensed Program Products (LPPs):

You must also install the boot JDK: Java10_AIX_PPC64.

A number of RPM packages are also required. The easiest method for installing these packages is to use yum, because yum takes care of any additional dependent packages for you.

Download the following file: yum_install_aix-ppc64.txt

This file contains a list of required RPM packages that you can install by specifying the following command:

yum shell yum_install_aix-ppc64.txt

It is important to take the list of package dependencies from this file because it is kept right up to date by our developers.

Download and setup freemarker.jar into your home directory by running the following commands:

cd /<my_home_dir>
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/freemarker/files/freemarker/2.3.8/freemarker-2.3.8.tar.gz/download -O freemarker.tgz
tar -xzf freemarker.tgz freemarker-2.3.8/lib/freemarker.jar --strip=2
rm -f freemarker.tgz

2. Get the source

📘 First you need to clone the Extensions for OpenJDK for OpenJ9 project. This repository is a git mirror of OpenJDK without the HotSpot JVM, but with an openj9 branch that contains a few necessary patches. Run the following command:

git clone https://github.com/ibmruntimes/openj9-openjdk-jdk11.git

Cloning this repository can take a while because OpenJDK is a large project! When the process is complete, change directory into the cloned repository:

cd openj9-openjdk-jdk11

Now fetch additional sources from the Eclipse OpenJ9 project and its clone of Eclipse OMR:

bash get_source.sh

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 binary with OpenSSL support and you do not have a built version of OpenSSL v1.1.x available locally, you must specify --openssl-version=<version> where <version> is an OpenSSL level like 1.1.0 or 1.1.1. If the specified version of OpenSSL is already available in the standard location (SRC_DIR/openssl), get_source.sh uses it. Otherwise, the script deletes the content and downloads the specified version of OpenSSL source to the standard location and builds it. If you already have the version of OpenSSL in the standard location but you want a fresh copy, you must delete your current copy.

3. Configure

📘 When you have all the source files that you need, run the configure script, which detects how to build in the current build environment.

bash configure --with-freemarker-jar=/<my_home_dir>/freemarker.jar \
               --with-cups-include=<cups_include_path> \
               --disable-warnings-as-errors

where <my_home_dir> is the location where you stored freemarker.jar and <cups_include_path> is the absolute path to CUPS. For example /opt/freeware/include.

📝 Non-compressed references support: If you require a heap size greater than 57GB, enable a noncompressedrefs build with the --with-noncompressedrefs option during this step.

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK that includes OpenSSL, you must specify --with-openssl={fetched|system|path_to_library}

where:

  • fetched uses the OpenSSL source downloaded by get-source.sh in step 2. Get the source.

  • system uses the package installed OpenSSL library in the system.

  • path_to_library uses a custom OpenSSL library that's already built.

    If you want to include the OpenSSL cryptographic library in the OpenJDK binary, you must include --enable-openssl-bundling.

4. build

📘 Now you're ready to build OpenJDK with OpenJ9:

make all

⚠️ If you just type make, rather than make all your build will fail, because the default make target is exploded-image. If you want to specify make instead of make all, you must add --default-make-target=images when you run the configure script. For more information, read this issue.

A binary for the full developer kit (jdk) is built and stored in the following directory:

  • build/aix-ppc64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

    📝 If you want a binary for the runtime environment (jre), you must run make legacy-jre-image, which produces a jre build in the build/aix-ppc64-normal-server-release/images/jre directory.

5. Test

📘 For a simple test, try running the java -version command. Change to the /jdk directory:

cd build/aix-ppc64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

Run:

./bin/java -version

Here is some sample output:

openjdk version "11-internal" 2018-09-25
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 11-internal+0-adhoc..openj9-openjdk-jdk11)
Eclipse OpenJ9 VM (build master-06905e2, JRE 11 AIX ppc64-64 Compressed References 20180726_000000 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
OpenJ9   - 06905e2
OMR      - 28139f2
JCL      - e5c64f5 based on jdk-11+21)

📝 OpenSSL support: If you built an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 that includes OpenSSL v1.1.x support, the following acknowledgements apply in accordance with the license terms:

  • This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/).
  • This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).

📘 Congratulations! 🎉


Windows

📒

The following instructions guide you through the process of building a Windows OpenJDK V11 binary that contains Eclipse OpenJ9. This process can be used to build binaries for Windows 7, 8, and 10.

1. Prepare your system

📒 You must install a number of software dependencies to create a suitable build environment on your system:

  • Cygwin, which provides a Unix-style command line interface. Install all packages in the Devel category. Included in this package is mingw, a minimalist subset of GNU tools for Microsoft Windows. OpenJ9 uses the mingw/GCC compiler and is tested with version 6.4.0 of same. Other versions are expected to work also. In the Archive category, install the packages zip and unzip. In the Utils category, install the cpio package. Install any further package dependencies that are identified by the installer. More information about using Cygwin can be found here.
  • Windows JDK 10, which is used as the boot JDK.
  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2017, which is the default compiler level used by OpenJDK11; or Microsoft Visual Studio 2013, which is chosen to compile if VS2017 isn't installed.
  • Freemarker V2.3.8
  • LLVM/Clang
  • NASM Assembler v2.13.03 or newer

Add the binary path of Clang to the PATH environment variable to override the older version of clang integrated in Cygwin. e.g.

export PATH="/cygdrive/c/LLVM/bin:$PATH" (in Cygwin)

Add the path to nasm.exe to the PATH environment variable to override the older version of NASM installed in Cygwin. e.g.

export PATH="/cygdrive/c/NASM:$PATH" (in Cygwin)

Update your LIB and INCLUDE environment variables to provide a path to the Windows debugging tools with the following commands:

set INCLUDE=C:\Program Files\Debugging Tools for Windows (x64)\sdk\inc;%INCLUDE%
set LIB=C:\Program Files\Debugging Tools for Windows (x64)\sdk\lib;%LIB%

You can download Visual Studio, Freemarker manually or obtain them using the wget utility. If you choose to use wget, follow these steps:

  • Open a cygwin terminal and change to the /temp directory:
cd /cygdrive/c/temp
  • Run the following commands:
wget https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=532495 -O vs2013.exe
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/freemarker/files/freemarker/2.3.8/freemarker-2.3.8.tar.gz/download -O freemarker.tgz
  • Before installing Visual Studio, change the permissions on the installation file by running chmod u+x vs2013.exe.
  • Install Visual Studio by running the file vs2013.exe (There is no special step required for downloading/installing VS2017. Please follow the guide of the downloaded installer to install all required components, especially for VC compiler).

Not all of the shared libraries that are included with Visual Studio are registered during installation. In particular, the msdia120.dll(VS2013) or msdia140.dll(VS2017) libraries must be registered manually. To do so, execute the following from a command prompt:

VS2013

regsvr32 "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\DIA SDK\bin\msdia120.dll"
regsvr32 "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\DIA SDK\bin\amd64\msdia120.dll"

VS2017

regsvr32 "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\Community\DIA SDK\bin\msdia140.dll"
regsvr32 "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2017\Community\DIA SDK\bin\amd64\msdia140.dll"
  • To unpack the Freemarker and Freetype compressed files, run:
tar -xzf freemarker.tgz freemarker-2.3.8/lib/freemarker.jar --strip=2

2. Get the source

📒 First you need to clone the Extensions for OpenJDK for OpenJ9 project. This repository is a git mirror of OpenJDK without the HotSpot JVM, but with an openj9 branch that contains a few necessary patches.

Run the following command in the Cygwin terminal:

git clone https://github.com/ibmruntimes/openj9-openjdk-jdk11.git

Cloning this repository can take a while because OpenJDK is a large project! When the process is complete, change directory into the cloned repository:

cd openj9-openjdk-jdk11

Now fetch additional sources from the Eclipse OpenJ9 project and its clone of Eclipse OMR:

bash get_source.sh

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 binary with OpenSSL support and you do not have a built version of OpenSSL v1.1.x available locally, you must obtain a prebuilt OpenSSL v1.1.x binary.

3. Configure

📒 When you have all the source files that you need, run the configure script, which detects how to build in the current build environment.

bash configure --disable-warnings-as-errors \
               --with-toolchain-version=2013 or 2017 \
               --with-freemarker-jar=/cygdrive/c/temp/freemarker.jar

Note: there is no need to specify --with-toolchain-version for 2017 as it will be located automatically

📝 Modify the paths for freemarker if you manually downloaded and unpacked these dependencies into different directories. If Java 10 is not available on the path, add the --with-boot-jdk=<path_to_jdk10> configuration option.

📝 Non-compressed references support: If you require a heap size greater than 57GB, enable a noncompressedrefs build with the --with-noncompressedrefs option during this step.

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK that includes OpenSSL, you must specify --with-openssl=path_to_library, where path_to_library specifies the path to the prebuilt OpenSSL library that you obtained in 2. Get the source. If you want to include the OpenSSL cryptographic library in the OpenJDK binary, you must also include --enable-openssl-bundling.

4. build

📒 Now you're ready to build OpenJDK with OpenJ9:

make all

A binary for the full developer kit (jdk) is built and stored in the following directory:

  • build/windows-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

    📝 If you want a binary for the runtime environment (jre), you must run make legacy-jre-image, which produces a jre build in the build/windows-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jre directory.

5. Test

📒 For a simple test, try running the java -version command. Change to the /jdk directory:

cd build/windows-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

Run:

./bin/java -version

Here is some sample output:

openjdk version "11-internal" 2018-09-25
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 11-internal+0-adhoc.Administrator.openj9-openjdk-jdk11)
Eclipse OpenJ9 VM (build master-11410ac2, JRE 11 Windows 7 amd64-64-Bit Compressed References 20180724_000000 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
OpenJ9   - 11410ac2
OMR      - e2e4b67c
JCL      - a786f96b13 based on jdk-11+21)

📝 OpenSSL support: If you built an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 that includes OpenSSL v1.1.x support, the following acknowledgements apply in accordance with the license terms:

  • This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/).
  • This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).

📒 Congratulations! 🎉


macOS

🍎 The following instructions guide you through the process of building a macOS OpenJDK V11 binary that contains Eclipse OpenJ9. This process can be used to build binaries for macOS 10.

1. Prepare your system

🍎 You must install a number of software dependencies to create a suitable build environment on your system:

The following dependencies can be installed by using Homebrew:

Freemarker V2.3.8 is also required, which can be obtained and installed with the following commands:

cd /<my_home_dir>
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/freemarker/files/freemarker/2.3.8/freemarker-2.3.8.tar.gz/download -O freemarker.tgz
tar -xzf freemarker.tgz freemarker-2.3.8/lib/freemarker.jar --strip-components=2
rm -f freemarker.tgz

Bash version 4 is required by the ./get_source.sh script that you will use in step 2, which is installed to /usr/local/bin/bash. To prevent problems during the build process, make Bash v4 your default shell by typing the following commands:

# Find the <CURRENT_SHELL> for <USERNAME>
dscl . -read <USERNAME> UserShell

# Change the shell to Bash version 4 for <USERNAME>
dscl . -change <USERNAME> UserShell <CURRENT_SHELL> /usr/local/bin/bash

# Verify that the shell has been changed
dscl . -read <USERNAME> UserShell

Set the following environment variables:

export SED=/usr/local/bin/gsed
export TAR=/usr/local/bin/gtar

2. Get the source

🍎 First you need to clone the Extensions for OpenJDK for OpenJ9 project. This repository is a git mirror of OpenJDK without the HotSpot JVM, but with an openj9 branch that contains a few necessary patches.

Run the following command:

git clone https://github.com/ibmruntimes/openj9-openjdk-jdk11.git

Cloning this repository can take a while because OpenJDK is a large project! When the process is complete, change directory into the cloned repository:

cd openj9-openjdk-jdk11

Now fetch additional sources from the Eclipse OpenJ9 project and its clone of Eclipse OMR:

bash ./get_source.sh

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 binary with OpenSSL support and you do not have a built version of OpenSSL v1.1.x available locally, you must obtain a prebuilt OpenSSL v1.1.x binary.

3. Configure

🍎 When you have all the source files that you need, run the configure script, which detects how to build in the current build environment.

bash configure --with-freemarker-jar=/<my_home_dir>/freemarker.jar \
               --with-boot-jdk=<path_to_macOS_JDK10> \
               --disable-warnings-as-errors

📝 Modify the paths for freemarker and the macOS boot JDK that you installed in step 1. If configure is unable to detect Freetype, add the option --with-freetype=<path to freetype>, where <path to freetype> is typically /usr/local/Cellar/freetype/2.9.1/.

📝 Non-compressed references support: If you require a heap size greater than 57GB, enable a noncompressedrefs build with the --with-noncompressedrefs option during this step.

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK that includes OpenSSL, you must specify --with-openssl=path_to_library, where path_to_library specifies the path to the prebuilt OpenSSL library that you obtained in 2. Get the source. If you want to include the OpenSSL cryptographic library in the OpenJDK binary, you must also include --enable-openssl-bundling.

4. build

🍎 Now you're ready to build OpenJDK with OpenJ9:

make all

Two builds of OpenJDK with Eclipse OpenJ9 are built and stored in the following directories:

  • build/macos-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

  • build/macos-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk-bundle

    📝 For running applications such as Eclipse, use the -bundle version.

    📝 If you want a binary for the runtime environment (jre), you must run make legacy-jre-image, which produces a jre build in the build/macos-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jre directory.

5. Test

🍎 For a simple test, try running the java -version command. Change to the /jdk directory:

cd build/macos-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

Run:

./bin/java -version

Here is some sample output:

openjdk version "11-internal" 2018-09-25
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 11-internal+0-adhoc.heidinga.openj9-openjdk-jdk11)
Eclipse OpenJ9 VM (build djh/libjava-72338d7a1, JRE 11 Mac OS X amd64-64-Bit Compressed References 20181104_000000 (JIT enabled, AOT enabled)
OpenJ9   - 72338d7a1
OMR      - d4cd7c31
JCL      - 9da99f8b97 based on jdk-11+28)

📝 OpenSSL support: If you built an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 that includes OpenSSL v1.1.x support, the following acknowledgements apply in accordance with the license terms:

  • This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/).
  • This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).

📒 Congratulations! 🎉


ARM

📱

🚧 We haven't created a full build process for ARM yet? Watch this space!


AArch64

🚧 This section is still under construction.

🐧 The following instructions guide you through the process of building an OpenJDK V11 binary that contains Eclipse OpenJ9 for AArch64 (ARMv8 64-bit) Linux.

1. Prepare your system

The binary can be built on your AArch64 Linux system, or in a Docker container 🐳 on x86-64 Linux.

Note: Building on x86-64 without Docker is not tested.

2. Get the source

🐧 First you need to clone the Extensions for OpenJDK for OpenJ9 project. This repository is a git mirror of OpenJDK without the HotSpot JVM, but with an openj9 branch that contains a few necessary patches. Run the following command:

git clone https://github.com/ibmruntimes/openj9-openjdk-jdk11.git

Cloning this repository can take a while because OpenJDK is a large project! When the process is complete, change directory into the cloned repository:

cd openj9-openjdk-jdk11

Now fetch additional sources from the Eclipse OpenJ9 project and its clone of Eclipse OMR:

bash get_source.sh

3. Prepare for build on AArch64 Linux

You must install a number of software dependencies to create a suitable build environment on your AArch64 Linux system:

See Setting up your build environment without Docker in Linux section for other dependencies to be installed.

4. Create the Docker image

If you build the binary on x86-64 Linux, run the following commands to build a Docker image for AArch64 cross-compilation, called openj9aarch64:

cd openj9/buildenv/docker/jdk11/aarch64_CC/arm-linux-aarch64
docker build -t openj9aarch64 -f Dockerfile .

Start a Docker container from the openj9aarch64 image with the following command, where <host_directory> is the directory that contains openj9-openjdk-jdk11 in your local system:

docker run -v /<host_directory>/openj9-openjdk-jdk11:/root/openj9-openjdk-jdk11 -it openj9aarch64

Then go to the openj9-openjdk-jdk11 directory:

cd /root/openj9-openjdk-jdk11

5. Configure

🐧 When you have all the source files that you need, run the configure script, which detects how to build in the current build environment.

For building on AArch64 Linux:

bash configure --with-freemarker-jar=/<path_to>/freemarker.jar \
               --with-boot-jdk=/<path_to_boot_JDK> \
               --disable-warnings-as-errors

For building in the Docker container:

bash configure --openjdk-target=${OPENJ9_CC_PREFIX} \
               --with-x=${OPENJ9_CC_DIR}/${OPENJ9_CC_PREFIX}/ \
               --with-freetype-include=${OPENJ9_CC_DIR}/${OPENJ9_CC_PREFIX}/libc/usr/include/freetype2 \
               --with-freetype-lib=${OPENJ9_CC_DIR}/${OPENJ9_CC_PREFIX}/libc/usr/lib \
               --with-freemarker-jar=/root/freemarker.jar \
               --with-boot-jdk=/root/bootjdk11 \
               --with-build-jdk=/root/bootjdk11 \
               --disable-warnings-as-errors

📝 Non-compressed references support: If you require a heap size greater than 57GB, enable a noncompressedrefs build with the --with-noncompressedrefs option during this step.

📝 OpenSSL support: If you want to build an OpenJDK that uses OpenSSL, you must specify --with-openssl={system|path_to_library}

where:

  • system uses the package installed OpenSSL library in the system. Use this option when you build on your AArch64 Linux system.
  • path_to_library uses an OpenSSL v1.1.x library that's already built. You can use ${OPENJ9_CC_DIR}/${OPENJ9_CC_PREFIX}/libc/usr as path_to_library when you are configuring in the Docker container.
  • Using --with-openssl=fetched will fail during the build in the Docker environment.

6. Build

🐧 Now you're ready to build OpenJDK with OpenJ9:

make all

A binary for the full developer kit (jdk) is built and stored in the following directory:

  • build/linux-aarch64-normal-server-release/images/jdk

Copy its contents to your AArch64 Linux device.

📝 If you want a binary for the runtime environment (jre), you must run make legacy-jre-image, which produces a jre build in the build/linux-aarch64-normal-server-release/images/jre directory.

6. Test

🐧 For a simple test, try running the java -version command. Change to your jdk directory on AArch64 Linux:

cd jdk

Run:

bin/java -Xint -version

Here is some sample output:

openjdk version "11.0.2-internal" 2019-01-15
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 11.0.2-internal+0-adhoc..openj9-openjdk-jdk11)
Eclipse OpenJ9 VM (build master-03a061a, JRE 11 Linux aarch64-64-Bit 20190208_000000 (JIT disabled, AOT disabled)
OpenJ9   - 03a061a
OMR      - a8ca0e6
JCL      - fd5cc89 based on jdk-11.0.2+7)

📝 The JIT compiler for AArch64 is not supported at the time of writing this. If you don't disable the JIT compiler with the -Xint option, you will see a warning for libj9jit29.so.

📝 OpenSSL support: If you built an OpenJDK with OpenJ9 that includes OpenSSL v1.1.x support, the following acknowledgements apply in accordance with the license terms:

  • This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/).
  • This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).

🐧 Congratulations! 🎉

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