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Octocat-spinner-32 bin Release v0.6.15. April 04, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 features * ecukes-reporter.el: -when-let used January 30, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 reporters Flush landing reporter. December 30, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 templates Whitespace. August 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 test f-glob has been replaced by f-files. January 30, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 vendor Use ert-runner. August 06, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 .ert-runner Add .ert-runner file instead of specifying options in Makefile. August 27, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 .gitignore Migrate from Carton to Cask. August 06, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 .travis.yml Update Travis. January 14, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 Cask Release v0.6.15. April 04, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 Makefile Clean up Makefile. August 29, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 README.markdown Add note in README about cucumber.el. February 08, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-byte-compile.el Define variable to avoid compile warnings. August 30, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-cli.el Improve and fix some issues with the debugger. January 14, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-core.el Improve and fix some issues with the debugger. January 14, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-def.el Add reporter interface. August 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-helpers.el Added namespace to occurences of symbol `features' December 30, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-hooks.el Run Fail-hook on fail. July 27, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-load.el * ecukes-load.el: avoid recursive searching January 30, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-new.el Fix compiler warnings and tests. August 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-parse.el Revert "Read table cells as strings." October 28, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-pkg.el Release v0.6.10. December 30, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-project.el Use f.el August 11, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-reporter.el * ecukes-reporter.el: -when-let used January 30, 2014
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-run.el Added namespace to occurences of symbol `features' December 30, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-stats.el Add reporter interface. August 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-steps.el Add reporter interface. August 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes-template.el Fix compiler warnings and tests. August 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 ecukes.el Replaced regex pattern with glob pattern as an argument to f-glob. December 17, 2013
README.markdown

Ecukes - Cucumber for Emacs Build Status

There are plenty of unit/regression testing tools for Emacs, and even some for functional testing. What Emacs is missing though is a really good testing framework for integration testing. This is where Ecukes comes in.

Cucumber is a great integration testing tool, used mostly for testing web applications. Ecukes is Cucumber for Emacs. No, it's not a major mode to edit feature files. It is a package that makes it possible to write Cucumber like tests for your Emacs packages.

Ecukes is not a complete clone of Cucumber and is not intended to be. If however Ecukes is missing some feature that you feel really should be included, please make a bug report.

If you don't know anything about Cucumber I suggest you read up a bit about it before continuing with Ecukes.

Table of Contents

Installation
Usage

Steps

Hooks

Debugging
Example
Contribution

Installation

Add ecukes to your Cask file:

(source melpa)

(package "super-duper" "0.0.1" "Super Duper.")

(development
 (depends-on "ecukes"))

Then run cask to install. To setup Ecukes for a project, run:

$ cask exec ecukes new

create features
create   step-definition
create     super-duper-steps.el
create   support
create     env.el
create   super-duper.feature

The project will now look like this:

$ ls super-duper

  super-duper/
  |-- README
  |-- features
  |   |-- step-definitions
  |   |   |-- super-duper-steps.el
  |   |-- super-duper.feature
  |   |-- support
  |       |-- env.el
  |-- super-duper.el

Usage

First off, install cucumber.el to get proper syntax highlighting and indenting.

To run Ecukes, use:

$ cask exec ecukes [COMMAND] [OPTIONS]

If you add a file called .ecukes in the project root, options are automatically used for each run. For example:

--tags ~@exclude
--no-win
--reporter gangsta

Modes

Ecukes can run in a few different modes: Script (--script), no win (--no-win) and win (--win).

Script (default)

If no mode is specified, the features will run in script mode. This will run the features as a batch job (emacs --script or emacs --batch).

This mode has a few quirks and it's recommended as a way to run features in local development, because it's fast and the output is printed directly (there's no way in Emacs to print to stdout or stderr when not running as a batch job).

It is for example not possible to test font faces in script mode. There's also no concept of lines so it's not possible to make assertions on lines.

If you run features on travis, use --no-win mode.

Example:

$ cask exec ecukes
$ cask exec ecukes --script # same as above

No win

In this mode, Ecukes will run Emacs with the -nw option.

Example:

$ cask exec ecukes --no-win

Win

This will start up an Emacs window and run the features. To use this mode, use the --win option.

Example:

$ cask exec ecukes --win

Tags

Features and scenarios can be tagged using syntax @tag, for example:

@core
Feature: Foo

  @wip @io
  Scenario: Bar
  @io
  Scenario: Baz

All tags on the feature will be copied down to the scenarios.

You can choose to run scenarios tagged with a tag using:

$ cask exec ecukes --tags @io

or run scenarios not tagged with a tag using:

$ cask exec ecukes --tags ~@io

or combine the two:

$ cask exec ecukes --tags @io,~@wip

Reporters

Ecukes has support for reporters so that you can get the output in a few different ways depending on your philosophical bent. To list all available reporters, run:

$ cask exec ecukes list-reporters

To use a specific reporter, run:

$ cask exec ecukes --reporter gangsta

Default reporter is dot.

Patterns and anti patterns

You can run scenarios matching or not matching a pattern using --pattern (-p) and --anti-pattern (-a) respectively. For example:

$ cask exec ecukes --pattern awesome
$ cask exec ecukes -p awesome almost-awesome
$ cask exec ecukes --anti-pattern awesome
$ cask exec ecukes -a awesome almost-awesome

Only failing

If you have a failing scenario and you only want to run that, you can use a tag, but you can also use the --only-failing (-f) option. For example:

$ cask exec ecukes --only-failing

Steps

There are three different kind of steps: Regular, table and py string. Check out Espuds for a comprehensive collection of steps.

Regular steps

A regular step always only consumes one line. The most basic step looks like this:

Given a known state

The corresponding step definition is:

(Given "a known state"
  (lambda ()
    ;; ...
    ))

The second argument could also have been the symbol of a function name:

(Given "a known state" 'do-something)

Steps accept arbitrary arguments. The arguments sent to the step definition function are all regular expression match groupings from the matching of the step name and the match string.

Single argument:

Given I am in buffer "buffer-name"

The corresponding step definition is:

(Given "I am in buffer \"\\(.+\\)\""
  (lambda (buffer-nane)
    ;; ...
    ))

Multiple arguments:

Given I am in buffer "buffer-name" with text "Foo"

The corresponding step definition is:

(Given "I am in buffer \"\\(.+\\)\" with text \"\\(.+\\)\""
  (lambda (buffer text)
    ;; ...
    ))

Table steps

A table step looks like this:

Given these meals:
  | meal      | price |
  | Hamburger | $4.50 |
  | Pizza     | $5.30 |

The corresponding step definition is:

(Given "these meals:"
  (lambda (meals)
    ;; ...
    ))

The argument meals is a simple list where the car of the list is the header and the cdr or the list are the rows.

The header would in the above case be:

("meal" "price")

And the rows would be:

(("Hamburger" "$4.50")
 ("Pizza" "$5.30"))

To pick out the header and rows attribute from a table you do:

(let* ((table ...)
       (header (car table))
       (rows   (cdr table)))
  ;; ...
  )

It is also possible to send arguments to a table step. The table list will be the last argument.

Given these meals at "fast food":
  | meal      | price |
  | Hamburger | $4.50 |
  | Pizza     | $5.30 |

The corresponding step definition is:

(Given "these meals at \"\\(.+\\)\":"
  (lambda (restaurant meals)
    ;; ...
    ))

Py String steps

A Py string step looks like this:

Given the following text:
  """
  some text
  """

The corresponding step definition is:

(Given "the following text:"
  (lambda (text)
    ;; ...
    ))

It is also possible to send arguments to a Py string step. The Py string will be the last argument.

Given the following text in buffer "buffer-name":
  """
  some text
  """

The corresponding step definition is:

(Given "the following text in buffer \"\\(.+\\)\":"
  (lambda (buffer text)
    ;; ...
    ))

Calling other steps

In order to keep your steps DRY, you can call steps from other steps like this:

(Given "I go to a"
  (lambda ()
    ;; Go to a
    ))

(Given "I go to b"
  (lambda ()
    ;; Go to b
    ))

(Given "I go from a to b"
  (lambda ()
    (Given "I go to a")
    (Given "I go to b")))

You can also pass arguments when calling other steps, like this:

(Given "I am in buffer \"%s\"" buffer-name-variable)

Or like this:

(Given "I am in buffer \"buffer-name\"")

Async steps

If you pass one extra parameter to a step definition, that is used as a callback. Once called, the step is considered done.

(When "^run command \\(.+\\)$"
  (lambda (command callback)
    (run-command command callback)))

If callback is not called within 10 seconds, it will fail automatically. The timeout can be changed using the --timeout (-t), for example:

$ cask exec ecukes --timeout 30

Checkout the features for Async for examples how to use: https://github.com/rejeep/ecukes.el/blob/master/features/async.feature

Listing steps

You can list all defined steps with list-steps, for example:

$ cask exec ecukes list-steps

If you want to get the step description, use the --with-doc option:

$ cask exec ecukes list-steps --with-doc

And if you want to know where it is defined, use the --with-file option:

$ cask exec ecukes list-steps --with-file

Hooks

Ecukes provides a few different hooks. They are useful if you test your program and change the state in some feature. Since all scenarios execute in the same environment, the state change will affect all scenarios after. You can solve that by resetting the state in a before or after hook.

Hooks should be placed in any file in the project features/support directory.

Setup

Runs once before anything runs.

(Setup
 ;; Run code
 )

Before

Runs once before each scenario runs.

(Before
 ;; Run code
 )

After

Runs once after each scenario runs.

(After
 ;; Run code
 )

Teardown

Runs once when everything is done.

(Teardown
 ;; Run code
 )

Fail

Runs when a scenario fails.

(Fail
 ;; Run code
 )

Debugging

If you have a failing scenario and you cant figure out how why, first off, try adding the --debug flag. For example:

$ cask exec ecukes --debug

Next step if that doesn't help, use the --error-log (-l) argument. If an error occurs, the backtrace will be logged to that file.

$ cask exec ecukes --error-log ecukes.err

Example

To get an idea of how Ecukes can be used, here is an example from a feature in drag-stuff.

~/Code/drag-stuff $ cask exec ecukes features/line.feature --reporter spec
Feature: Drag line
  In order to move a line up and down
  As an Emacs user
  I want to drag it

  Background:
    Given I am in the buffer "*drag-stuff*"
    And the buffer is empty
    And I insert
    """
      line 1
      line 2
    """

  Scenario: Drag line up
    When I go to line "2"
    And I press "<M-up>"
    Then I should see:
    """
      line 2
      line 1
    """

  Scenario: Drag line down
    When I go to line "1"
    And I press "<M-down>"
    Then I should see:
    """
      line 2
      line 1
    """

2 scenarios (0 failed, 2 passed)
11 steps (0 failed, 11 passed)

Contribution

All contributions are much welcome and appreciated!

Before submitting a patch, make sure to write a test for it (if possible). Ecukes is unit tested with a testing framework called Ert (Emacs Lisp Regression Testing). But most notably, it's tested using Ecukes! :)

To run the tests, you have to install Cask if you haven't already. Once installed, run the cask command to install all dependencies.

To run all tests, simply run the make command.

You can always report issues on Github if you're not up to fixing it yourself.

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