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Merge branch 'wds-review-may6' and 'grammar-edits'

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	karulf-thesis/thesis-hri.tex
	karulf-thesis/thesis-introduction.tex
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2 parents 7bf4764 + 7db8b1e commit 001ddee1f42cee40c3bbb8a292f023d68abf8eca @ekarulf committed May 8, 2011
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ \section{Future User Studies}
In order to evaluate the sliding autonomy approach, we will run a randomized three-condition within subject experiment. Instead of using notifications we will use the control modes as our independent variable. This gives us three conditions to test: only direct control, only supervisory control, and blended control. This would allow us to directly compare the given modes and record metrics on the blended control interfaces such as time spent in each mode and the number of mode switches.
-As mentioned above while we can correlate successful task completion with improved usability, we would like to utilize a more direct metric. Researchers at the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed a metric for describing a human's workload while accomplishing a task. The metric, known as the ``Task Load Index'', is computed from a user's perceived workload on six sub-scales: mental demand, physical demand, temporal demand, performance, effort, and frustration. \cite{NASA_TLX} Our revised user study would ask subjects to rate their workload on each of the Task Load Index's six sub-scales after each experiment. At the conclusion of the user study, we would ask users to answer the fifteen questions to determine the weighting of the sub-scales when computing the task load index. \cite{NASA_TLX20}
+As mentioned above while we can correlate successful task completion with improved usability, we would like to utilize a more direct metric. Researchers at the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed a metric for describing a human's workload while accomplishing a task. The metric, known as the ``Task Load Index'', is computed from a user's perceived workload on six sub-scales: mental demand, physical demand, temporal demand, performance, effort, and frustration. \cite{NASA_TLX} Our revised user study would ask subjects to rate their workload on each of the Task Load Index's six sub-scales after each experiment. At the conclusion of the user study, we would ask users to answer the fifteen questions to determine the weighting of the sub-scales when computing the task load index \cite{NASA_TLX20}.
Given the context of testing the control modes using the NASA Task Load Index, we decided to modify the subjects' tasks to more accurately represent our use cases. These new - more challenging - tasks would require a larger simulated world, more robots, and a different scenario. A weakness in the preliminary user study's scenario, is that the robots were able to complete their task immediately. This model does not match a use case in the real world, where most actions will require a non-zero amount of time to complete. Such a study, we believe, will show the benefits of mixed-mode interfaces across the whole population when even experienced users cannot realistically monitor all robots at once.
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