A JavaScript AMF Client library
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README.md

amfjs

AMFJS is an AMF Client JavaScript library

Limited AMF 0

The library does enough AMF 0 to be able to send and receive packet headers.

Basic Example

Here is a AMFJS Ping Pong example:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>AMFJS</title>
    <script src="amf.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
</head>
<body>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var amfClient = new amf.Client("amfphp", "http://127.0.0.1/server/gateway.php");
        var p = amfClient.invoke("test", "ping", []);
        
        p.then(
            function(res) {
                console.log(res.data);
            },
            function(err) {
                console.log("ping error");
            }
        );
    </script>
</body>
</html>

This example loads amf.js, which makes the amf global object available.

var amfClient = amf.Client("amfphp", "http://127.0.0.1/server/gateway.php");

A new AMF Client instance is created, and initialized with the desired destination and endpoint.

var p = amfClient.invoke("test", "ping", []);

p.then(
    function(res) {
        console.log(res.data);
    },
    function(err) {
        console.log("res.message");
    }
);

Sends and AMF request to the test service, invoking the ping method with no parameters. The invoke method returns a Promise, which is used to handle the response or error.

The PHP service is very simple and looks like this.

<?php
class test
{
    public function ping()
    {
        return 'pong';
    }
}
?>

If the AMF Client has not been assigned a clientId by the server, a flex.messaging.messages.CommandMessage with a CLIENT_PING_OPERATION will be sent to the server first, in order to test connectivity over the current channel to the remote endpoint, and get a clientId assigned.

TypeScript

Typings cover the main usage of the library.

let amfc = new amf.Client("app", "http://127.0.0.1/server/amf.php");
let p = amfClient.invoke("test", "ping", []);

p.then((res: amf.Response) => {
    console.log(res.data);
}).catch((res: amf.Response) => {
    console.log(res.message);
});

Block Request Queue

The AMF Client operates a request queue. When multiple requests are sent close together, they are batched in the same AMF packet. During startup of an application one may need to do some initialisation before subsequent requests are sent. When the queue is blocked it is the responsibility of the user to release it.

let p1 = amfc.invoke<amf.Response>("SessionService", "establishSession", [], true);

p1.then((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on success, and release the queue
    amfc.releaseQueue();
}).catch((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on failure
});

let p2 = amfc.invoke<amf.Response>("DataService", "getSomeData", []);

p2.then((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on success
}).catch((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on failure
});

In the example above two requests are invoked, but as the first one blocks the request queue, the second one is not sent, unless the first one succeeds and the queue is released. Releasing the queue with amfc.releaseQueue() sends the queued requests. This may be useful to avoid structuring user code in an incovenient way in order to achieve the same.

Request Batching

Requests are sent close together are batched in the same AMF packet automatically. There is nothing the end user needs to do to achieve this. However, on occasion (for example testing) one may need to prevent a particular request be batched. This can be achieved with the fifth paramenter of the AMF Client invoke() method.

let p1 = amfc.invoke<amf.Response>("DataService1", "getSomeData");

p1.then((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on success
}).catch((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on failure
});

let p2 = amfc.invoke<amf.Response>("DataService2", "getSomeData", [], false, true);

p2.then((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on success
}).catch((res: amf.Response) => {
    //do something on failure
});

In the example above, the second request is sent immediately after the first one in a separate AMF packet.

History

Originally based on Surrey's R-AMF (AMF 99) implementation https://code.google.com/p/r-amf/

I found R-AMF while looking for a JavaScript AMF implementation. Unfortunately my server (at the time) was based on AMFPHP, and that meant I could not use the R-AMF Java server. Implementing AMF 99 in PHP was not too hard, but after spending some time working on the C implementaition for the AMFEXT PHP extension I realised it would take longer than the time I had available for the project. Using AMF 99 also meant that the HTTP debugging proxy was not fully functional.

While Surrey's AMF 99 provides an interesting variation of AMF, as http://www.reignite.com.au/binary-communication-using-ajax-and-amf/, it also requires an AMF 99 server.

Ultimately I decided to implement AMF 3 with limited AMF 0 support. Then write my own server library EFXPHP (https://github.com/emilkm/efxphp), and update the AMFEXT C extension for PHP (https://github.com/emilkm/amfext) to work with PHP 7 and greater.

As the effort on the AMFEXT C extension for PHP swallowed enormous amounts of time, writing documentation and tests for this library got delayed.

TODO

  • Documentation
  • More tests