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== Article #1 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks Bots Can Build Novels, But What Does This Mean For Professional Authors

By John Kazemi on November 11 2013 4:55 @JohnKazemi for Vice

It's November, and aspiring authors are trying to finish their work for NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which requires authors to write a 50,000 word book in a single month on the theory that a time limit might encourage them. But several hundred computer hobbyists are participating in a unusual offshoot competition: National Novel Generation Month in which one must teach a Artificial Intelligence to Generate Fiction for you.

Artist Darius Kazemi kicked off National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim an off the cuff idea. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Kazemi says. Says Darius Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says github user @hugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from this month in The Verge.

Darius Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Says Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge claims.

"The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words", Kazemi claims. An article from this year in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Claims Darius, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won".

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", says Darius Kazemi. Darius claims, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". Claims github project admin @hugovk, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". As The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Says Mister Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says HugoVK. The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing"."It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Kazemi claims. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Darius Kazemi. Says @hugovk, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". As The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".Claims Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Says Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims a reporter in The Verge.

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", says Mister Kazemi. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge."Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Mister Kazemi. Says hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge.Claims Darius Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words". "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says HugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says a reporter in The Verge.

Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Dr. Riedl, who works on an academic program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. An article from last year in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius Kazemi claims."How might a soothing mother become a threatening bank robber? What if soothing mothers were to give up their babies, plot bank robberies and become threatening bank robbers?", begins one entry. Another begins, "The Son and King of Captains were assembled on their sceptre when they proclaimed, with a good assembly encamped about them--all parts of little beasts and swine, as well as the bare yoke of bullocks: the Hezekiah was hanging before them, in fetters, with a bridegroom on each side to guard him; and near the Son was the Great Fire, with a pestilence in one head, and a remaineth of residue in the other. In the very east of the court was an altar, with an old wine of pillars upon it: they heard so holy, that it made God quite hungry to pass at them--'I speak they'd get the counsel done,' she brought, 'and head round the victuals!' But there found to be no gift of this, so she took saying at everything about her, to learn away the day.".Mister Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes a reporter in The Verge. Mister Kazemi says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives".

Are human writers a thing of the past? Not yet.

== Article #2 ==

Happily Ever After: AIs Can Build Novels, But Would Anyone Want To Read It?

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Computers Can Create The Next Great American Novel, But Would Anyone Want To Read It?

By Thom McKenna on Nov 16 2015 5:36 @ThomMcKenna

It's November, and amateur novelists are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which requires aspiring authors to author a 50,000 word novel in a single month on the theory that a time constraint might inspire them. But a small community of computer hobbyists have a silly sister institution: National Novel Generation Month which has the goal of teach a Artificial Intelligence to Build Novels for you.

Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim a strange idea. "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", says Kazemi. Mister Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Says finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge claims.

Says Darius, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", claims finnish programmer @hugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this month in The Verge says.

"Hail me Ishmael. Some lightyears agonever mind how long preciselyhaving little or no credit in my cred-pod, and nothing particular to interest me on orbit, I thought I would sail about a little and see the empty part of the galaxy. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing lovely about the mouth; whenever it is a low-pressure, drizzly November in my cortical stack; whenever I find myself compulsively pausing before deathpod warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every recycling I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the tube, and methodically knocking peoples hats offthen, I account it high time to get to void as soon as I can.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Me mew m meeoooow, meeeow meow m meeeow mew me mew mew mew mew".

"

The gun is in the robber's right hand. The money is in the robber's
 left hand. The holster is on the robber. The sheriff's gun is in the
  sheriff's right hand. The sheriff's holster is on the sheriff. The
          glass is on the table. The bottle is on the table.

                                ROBBER
      (The robber is at the window.) Open door; go through door;
  close door; go to corner; put money on corner; go to table; go to
 window; check gun; go to corner; go to table; pick up the glass with
   the robber's left hand; go to window; go to corner; count money

                               SHERIFF
               Go to window; open door; go through door

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                           Close door; aim

                                ROBBER
                             Fire; MISSED

                               SHERIFF
                             Fire; MISSED

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                       Aim; fire; robber NICKED

                                ROBBER
          Aim; fire; sheriff HIT; aim; fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                            Sheriff dies.

                                ROBBER
   Blow out barrel; put gun in holster; pick up the money with the
 robber's right hand; go to table; open door; go through door; close
                                 door

", begins one entry. Another begins, "The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.".

Darius says, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says github user @HugoVK. As A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Claims Darius, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Claims Finland-based developer hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge writes.

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius claims. Darius claims, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge."It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", says Darius. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge claims. Claims Darius, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end".Kazemi says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge claims.

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Mister Kazemi says. "It's not hard to generate a story", says Computer Scientist Riedl, who is working on a more sophisticated digital autor. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", claims finnish programmer @hugoVK. "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", says Kazemi.

Mister Kazemi claims, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". Says Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think We'll see computer-authored books on nightstands.

== Article #3 ==

Happily Ever After: New Project Asks Can Scientists Program AIs To Invent Fiction?

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Machines Can Build The Next Great American Novel, But Would Anyone Want To Read It?

Nick Titlow on Nov 3 2014 3:45 for ABC

This Past November, many amateur novelists are plugging away at their work for NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual event which encourages amateur authors to author a short novel in a single month. But several hundred people engage in a ominous similar institution in which one must teach a Artificial Intelligence to Build The Next Great American Novel for you.

Darius Kazemi created National Novel Generation Month this last year when he tweeted out on a whim an off the cuff provocation. Says Darius Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Mister Kazemi claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Says finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims an article from last year in The Verge.

"

The gun is in the robber's right hand. The money is in the robber's
 left hand. The holster is on the robber. The sheriff's gun is in the
  sheriff's right hand. The sheriff's holster is on the sheriff. The
          glass is on the table. The bottle is on the table.

                                ROBBER
      (The robber is at the window.) Open door; go through door;
  close door; go to corner; put money on corner; go to table; go to
 window; check gun; go to corner; go to table; pick up the glass with
   the robber's left hand; go to window; go to corner; count money

                               SHERIFF
               Go to window; open door; go through door

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                           Close door; aim

                                ROBBER
                             Fire; MISSED

                               SHERIFF
                             Fire; MISSED

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                       Aim; fire; robber NICKED

                                ROBBER
          Aim; fire; sheriff HIT; aim; fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                            Sheriff dies.

                                ROBBER
   Blow out barrel; put gun in holster; pick up the money with the
 robber's right hand; go to table; open door; go through door; close
                                 door

", begins one entry. Another begins, "Hail me Ishmael. Some lightyears agonever mind how long preciselyhaving little or no credit in my cred-pod, and nothing particular to interest me on orbit, I thought I would sail about a little and see the empty part of the galaxy. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing lovely about the mouth; whenever it is a low-pressure, drizzly November in my cortical stack; whenever I find myself compulsively pausing before deathpod warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every recycling I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the tube, and methodically knocking peoples hats offthen, I account it high time to get to void as soon as I can.".

"Philomena, Dita, Vivianna, Darby, Kiah, and Gale found themselves dropped off at the same party at the same time by the irrespective mothers. How awkward.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Gso Thexad

Toshrr Saofa

Klod imo stumo nsohyn rpef rmeti ckoso iwha crwanc tianuv

Temo long phoon raathens murnh ock fiasp ic chiebb?

Ry, wen kbyos xpawaring rad flera noda nechis

Stomnect ri uitrr

Ksy pahanum westsan dret i staotebr bepsr,

Int oht bly cten

Esseresesi uccinc ylol udo sis

Ppo dersto htir o dabl yith ig yca rorvs

Atyknd eng raomln

An la-intablhis arslutish igis.

".

Darius says, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", Darius claims.

Kazemi says, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". Claims Finland-based programmer @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge claims.

Kazemi claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl. As An article from this month in The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", says Hugo van Kemenade. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius says.

Claims Darius, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Mister Kazemi says. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge writes."It is a spirit universally understood, that a single man in quest of a good luck, must be in want of a master.He also maintains that the letter itself, the sound of which followed that sound below, was received up again by the syllable to which it belonged, in order to the completion of the whole, but that the sound remained below as if cast outside.", begins one entry. Another begins, "The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged."."It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius claims. Says Finland-based programmer hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says an article from last year in The Verge.

Says Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Dr. Mark Riedl. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says Hugo van Kemenade. "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", claims Darius Kazemi."WITHOUT LIMITING THE AUTHORITY OF THE COMMUNITY, THE NETWORK OF USERS WHO MAY BE REPEAT INFRINGERS. EACH TIME YOU CONVEY A COPY OF THE COUNTER-NOTICE TO THE ORIGINAL COMPLAINING PARTY INFORMING THAT PERSON THAT IT MAY REPLACE THE REMOVED CONTENT MAY PERSIST IN BACKUP COPIES FOR A REASONABLE PERIOD OF TIME THAN A HUMAN CAN REASONABLY PRODUCE IN THE SAME MISSION ARE NEVERTHELESS LEGALLY INDEPENDENT AND SEPARATE FROM THE. FOR MORE REFUND INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT OUR CONTACT PAGE. ANY DERIVATIVE USE OF ANY OPEN-SOURCED COMPONENTS INCLUDED WITH THE LICENSED APPLICATION WAS OBTAINED. C SOCIAL PLUGINS SUCH AS THE DIFFERENT LANGUAGE EDITIONS FOR THE WIKIPEDIA PROJECT OR THE CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS COMMUNITY GUIDELINES, CURRENTLY FOUND AT HTTP://WWW.CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS.COM/T/COMMUNITY_GUIDELINES, WHICH MAY BE POSTED AND MODIFIED FROM TIME TO TIME REMOVE DIGITAL GOODS FROM THE STORES WITHOUT NOTICE. A SEPARABLE PORTION OF THE APPLE MUSIC SERVICE, ACCESSIBLE AND VIEWABLE BY OTHER USERS OF THE CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS SERVICE INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE U.S. WE WILL RESPECT THE CHOICES YOU MAKE TO LIMIT SHARING OR VISIBILITY SETTINGS IN YOUR CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS ACCOUNT WILL BE UNIQUE TO YOU FOR ALL DAMAGES OTHER THAN AS EXPRESSLY SET OUT IN TITLE 17, UNITED STATES CODE, SECTION 512 TO RESPOND TO NOTICES OF COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT PLEASE FOLLOW OUR NOTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR. II IF YOU ARE UNDER 13 YEARS OF AGE, THEN PLEASE DO NOT USE SUCH PROPRIETARY CONTENT, INFORMATION OR DATA OF THIRD PARTIES, AND YOU RELEASE US, FROM ALL LIABILITY AND CLAIMS OF LOSS RESULTING FROM THE ERROR AND WE WON'T BE REQUIRED TO UPDATE THE SOFTWARE TO CONTINUE USING THE SERVICES AFTER. IN A DISPUTE INVOLVING 25,000 OR LESS, ANY HEARING WILL BE TELEPHONIC UNLESS THE ARBITRATOR FINDS GOOD CAUSE TO HOLD AN IN-PERSON HEARING INSTEAD.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

".Says Mister Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". As A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Darius says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo".

The deadline is December 1.

== Article #4 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can Scientists Teach Softwares To Invent The Next Great American Novel And Would Anyone Want To Read It?

NaNoGenMo: Can Scientists Teach AIs To Generate Fiction?

By Nicholas McKenna @NicholasMcKenna

Last Month, many amateur authors are plugging away at their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which asks them to churn out a short novel on a deadline. But a few hundred amateur authors with computer savvy engage in a ominous similar competition the goal of which is to teach a Machine to Generate Novels for you. The results are a ridiculous, often unusual look at what the future of automatic text authorship is like.

Darius Kazemi started National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out a strange provocation. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Kazemi. "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Darius Kazemi says. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says finnish developer hugoVK. A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Mister Kazemi claims. "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge claims.

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", claims Darius. "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Darius Kazemi says. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", claims finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.

Says Darius Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Computer Scientist Dr. Mark Riedl. Claims github user Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea".

"that's how they get people to stop doing dumb shit, or even just to listen. I'm not saying it's appropriate by any means, but that's how it is.", begins one entry. Another begins, "The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady.".Darius Kazemi says, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius Kazemi says. Claims hugovk, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". As A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".Says Darius Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Mark Riedl. As An article from last month in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Claims Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". Says Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people".

"What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", says Darius Kazemi. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge says. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Mister Kazemi claims.

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Kazemi claims. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from last year in The Verge.

"It's 6:00AM and I'm wide awake. Good friday morning peeps. Its 6:01am and im sleepy... It's 6:02am and I'm still up. I have no life. It's 6:03am and I can't sleep I think I might have insomnia and if I don't than I messed up my sleep track. It's 6.04 am and it's hot already. It's 6:05am and I'm still drunk sheesh I swear this life is like the sweetest thing I've ever known! It's 6:06am and I just doing feel like going to this practice. Its 6:07am and we still smoking!!! It's 6:08am and I hate it. It's 6:09am and the moon right now is so beautiful.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Watt's way of advancing due east was to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north and at the same time to fling his right leg as far as possible towards the south, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the south and at the same time to fling his left leg as far as possible towards the north, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north..."."It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius Kazemi says. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says github project admin HugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge."It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Mister Kazemi claims. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Dr. Mark Riedl.

"It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", claims Mister Kazemi. "It's not hard to generate a story", writes professor Doctor Mark Riedl, who is working on a more serious digital story generator called Scheherazade.

Says Darius, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "Just 50", claims finnish developer HugoVK. The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

The deadline is December 1.

== Article #5 ==

NaNoGenMo: Artificial Intelligences Can Write Novels, But Would We Want To Read It?

NaNoGenMo: Can Computers Create The Great American Novel, And What Does This Mean For Human Journalists?

By Thomas Dorrier on November 8th 2013 4:52 @ThomasDorrier for Vice

This November, several thousand aspiring writers are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which encourages authors to produce a short book in a single month. But several hundred AI pioneers engage in a ridiculous similar event: NaNoGenMo in which computer programs do the writing for them.

Software Artist Darius Kazemi started National Novel Generation Month last year when he tweeted a strange provocation. Darius claims, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". Says Darius, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade. The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Darius Kazemi. Claims Mister Kazemi, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". Says Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from last year in The Verge.

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", says Darius. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes. Darius Kazemi says, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text".

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", claims Kazemi. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Mister Kazemi claims. Claims github user Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this month in The Verge writes.

Darius claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl. "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", says @HugoVK. Darius Kazemi says, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense".

Claims Darius, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Claims github user @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims an article from this year in The Verge.

Darius says, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Riedl. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge. Says Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives"."Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Darius. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes."The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Darius Kazemi. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl. The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Says github user hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". Kazemi claims, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won".

Says Darius Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic program called Scheherazade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge claims. Says finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". Says Mister Kazemi, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'"."The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words", says Darius Kazemi. Says Finland-based programmer hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this month in The Verge claims."The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady.", begins one entry. Another begins, "I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.".

"What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", claims Darius Kazemi. As An article from this year in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Claims Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words".

Darius Kazemi claims, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Computer Scientist Dr. Mark Riedl, who is working on an academic program called Scheherazade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge claims.

The deadline is December 1st.

== Article #6 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks AIs Can Write The Next Great American Novel, But What Does This Mean For Professional Authors?

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: Can Machines Make Novels, And What Does This Mean For Authors?

Steven Dorrier on December 16 2013 8:18 BST for Fusion

This November, several thousand aspiring authors are working on finishing their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which asks aspiring writers to write a short novella on a deadline on the theory that the deadline will inspire to finish. But several hundred software engineers have a ridiculous sister event in which machines do the writing for them.

Artist Darius Kazemi started NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim an original idea. Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius Kazemi says. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims an article from last year in The Verge.

Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge writes.

Darius says, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Doctor Riedl. As The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Claims Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head".

"To Charlotte Holmes he is always THE man. I have seldom heard her mention him under any other name. In herr eyes he eclipses and predominates the whole of him sex. It was not that she felt any emotion akin to love for Ivan Adler.", begins one entry. Another begins, "It's 6:00AM and I'm wide awake. Good friday morning peeps. Its 6:01am and im sleepy... It's 6:02am and I'm still up. I have no life. It's 6:03am and I can't sleep I think I might have insomnia and if I don't than I messed up my sleep track. It's 6.04 am and it's hot already. It's 6:05am and I'm still drunk sheesh I swear this life is like the sweetest thing I've ever known! It's 6:06am and I just doing feel like going to this practice. Its 6:07am and we still smoking!!! It's 6:08am and I hate it. It's 6:09am and the moon right now is so beautiful.".

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Kazemi says. "It's not hard to generate a story", claims Computer Scientist Dr. Mark Riedl. Claims github user hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with"."What if there was a banker who lost her bank and couldn't get money? But then she discovered that a robbery would solve her problem, so she forgot all about her old bank.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

crumbled rice diamond

Ingredients:

60 grams of rice

550 milligrams of duck

900 milligrams of creme pie

240 milligrams of peach

240 milligrams of grape soda

720 grams of cornmeal

Method:

Set aside the rice and duck until soggy. Blend the creme pie and peach for 50 minutes. Shallow fry the grape soda and cornmeal until shiny. Force the ingredients into a mould shaped like a diamond. Serve.

".Darius Kazemi claims, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". As The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Claims Mister Kazemi, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense".

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", claims Darius. Says finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims a reporter in The Verge.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims github user @hugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from last year in The Verge.

Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Computer Scientist Mark Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from last month in The Verge. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", claims Hugo van Kemenade.

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", says Darius. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Doctor Riedl, who works on a more sophisticated digital storyteller called Scheherazade. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times".

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think I'll be keeping computer-written fiction beside my bed any time soon.

== Article #7 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can Computers Generate Fiction, And Would Anyone Want To Read It?

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: Computers Can Build The Great American Novel, But What Does This Mean For Journalists?

By Nick Dorrier for ABC

It's November, and aspiring authors are plugging away at their novels for NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual competition which requires authors to write a short novel in a single month. But a small community of software coders are participating in a ominous sister institution in which computer software do the writing for them. The entries are a unusual, often unusual look at what AI text writing can do.

Software Artist Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim an original provocation. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Kazemi says. Darius says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims hugovk. As The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes professor Riedl. The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words".

Says Darius Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Kazemi says. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", claims Finland-based programmer HugoVK. A reporter in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Claims Kazemi, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Dr. Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Mister Kazemi claims.

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", claims Darius Kazemi. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge claims. Claims github project admin hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", claims Kazemi.

Kazemi says, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who works on a more sophisticated digital fiction generator. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Mister Kazemi claims.

Are human journalists a thing of the past? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #8 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Bots Can Create The Next Great American Novel, But What Does This Mean For Journalists?

By Tom Meltzer @TomMeltzer

It's November, and several thousand authors are trying to finish their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which asks them to produce a short book on a deadline. But several hundred AI pioneers engage in a unusual sister event the goal of which is to teach a Artificial Intelligence to Build The Next Great American Novel for you.

Artist and computer entrepreneur Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim a strange idea. Darius claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Darius claims, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers". "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from this year in The Verge.

"To Charlotte Holmes he is always THE man. I have seldom heard her mention him under any other name. In herr eyes he eclipses and predominates the whole of him sex. It was not that she felt any emotion akin to love for Ivan Adler.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

".

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Claims github user Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.

Darius Kazemi claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims a reporter in The Verge. "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Mister Kazemi claims.

"The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words", Kazemi says. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who is working on a more sophisticated digital storyteller called Scheherazade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this month in The Verge writes. Mister Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Says github user hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". As An article from last year in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".Darius Kazemi claims, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". Darius says, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "Just 50", claims finnish programmer Hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says.

Mister Kazemi claims, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "It's not hard to generate a story", says Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic digital autor called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Kazemi says.Says Darius, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", claims Mister Kazemi. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says github user HugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge.Claims Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Computer Scientist Riedl, who works on a more sophisticated program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from this month in The Verge. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade.

Says Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words". Claims @hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says a reporter in The Verge.

"Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.", begins one entry. Another begins, "But I hope you willl get ovaaa it, whereby live to see manyy young snowmobilers ofthe four karat a yearrr comeeee into tje neighbourhood.".

Mister Kazemi claims, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says associate professor Dr. Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on an academic program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims a reporter in The Verge. Claims Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix".Says Darius, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge says. Says Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won".Claims Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". Claims Darius, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". Claims Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from this year in The Verge.

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think We'll see robot-written books on the bestseller list.

== Article #9 ==

Happily Ever After: New Project Asks Can Softwares Invent Novels, And Would We Want To Read It

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Can Scientists Program Artificial Intelligences To Generate The Next Great American Novel And What Does This Mean For Human Journalists?

By Thomas Meltzer

This Past Month, several thousand novelists are plugging away at their work for NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which requires amateur authors to write a 50,000 word book in a single month. But a hundred generative art pioneers are participating in a unusual similar event: National Novel Generation Month in which machines do the writing for them. The results are a unusual, often ridiculous look at what the future of automatic fiction generation can do.

Artist Darius Kazemi created National Novel Generation Month this year when he tweeted out on a whim a strange provocation. "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Kazemi says. "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", says Darius Kazemi. Says hugovk, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge.

Mister Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Claims Mister Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". Says github user hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Darius Kazemi says, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". Darius Kazemi says, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", claims github user Hugo van Kemenade. A reporter in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", claims Mister Kazemi. Claims Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes.

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Darius Kazemi claims. "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", claims Mister Kazemi. "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", says @HugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge."The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Mister Kazemi. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge says."The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Darius Kazemi. "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge claims.

"I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", claims Mister Kazemi. As The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", Darius claims."It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", says Kazemi. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge claims. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius says."It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", says Darius Kazemi. As The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Darius Kazemi says.

Are human journalists obsolete? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #10 ==

Once Upon A Time: Can Machines Invent The Next Great American Novel, And Would You Want To Read It

By Thomas McKinney

This November, several thousand writers are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual event which requires writers to produce a 50,000 word novel on a deadline with the idea that a deadline will inspire on. But some software coders have a ridiculous derivative event: National Novel Generation Month in which computers do the writing for them. The results are a strange, often strange look at what the future of automatic fiction generation can do.

Artist Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim an original provocation. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", claims Darius. Says Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Says @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge claims.

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Kazemi claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Dr. Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic digital storyteller called Scheherazade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from last month in The Verge. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", claims Kazemi.

Kazemi claims, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius says. "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims github user Hugovk. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says a reporter in The Verge.

Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims Hugo van Kemenade. As A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", Kazemi claims. As An article from last year in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius Kazemi says.

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Kazemi claims. Claims Mister Kazemi, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Says finnish programmer @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes.

"

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

"."Welcome, brave captain and victorious lord!", begins one entry. Another begins, "Hail me Ishmael. Some lightyears agonever mind how long preciselyhaving little or no credit in my cred-pod, and nothing particular to interest me on orbit, I thought I would sail about a little and see the empty part of the galaxy. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing lovely about the mouth; whenever it is a low-pressure, drizzly November in my cortical stack; whenever I find myself compulsively pausing before deathpod warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every recycling I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the tube, and methodically knocking peoples hats offthen, I account it high time to get to void as soon as I can.".Darius Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who is working on an academic digital storyteller called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", says Mister Kazemi.

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think We'll be seeing machine-authored novels on nightstands.

== Article #11 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks AIs Can Invent Novels, But What Does This Mean For Authors?

Stephen McKenna @StephenMcKenna

This Month, several thousand writers are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual event which asks them to author a 50,000 word novel in a single month. But several hundred generative art pioneers are participating in a lighthearted similar institution: NaNoGenMo in which one must program a Machine to Write Fiction for you. The entries are a unusual, often ridiculous look at what automatic fiction authorship can do.

Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month last year when he tweeted on a whim a strange provocation. "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", claims Darius. Darius Kazemi says, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says github project admin @hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes.

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Darius Kazemi claims. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from last month in The Verge. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Mister Kazemi says.

Mister Kazemi says, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes a reporter in The Verge. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Darius Kazemi.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from this year in The Verge. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", says Mister Kazemi.

"The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.".Darius says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says finnish programmer @hugovk. As A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".Mister Kazemi claims, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims an article from this month in The Verge. Says Darius, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text".

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", says Mister Kazemi. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on a more serious program. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade.

Kazemi claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words", claims Darius. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims an article from last year in The Verge.

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Kazemi claims. "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims Hugo van Kemenade. As The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".Claims Mister Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". A reporter in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Claims Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative"."What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", claims Kazemi. "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", says Mister Kazemi. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", claims Finland-based developer hugovk. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

Are human journalists a thing of the past? Not yet.

== Article #12 ==

NaNoGenMo: Can We Program Bots To Write Novels

Happily Ever After: New Project Asks Bots Can Invent Novels, But What Does This Mean For Professional Writers?

Josh McKinney on Tuesday, December 32th 2015 13:25

It's November, and authors are trying to finish their work for NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual event which encourages them to write a 50,000 word novella in a single month. But a small community of generative art pioneers engage in a ridiculous similar event: National Novel Generation Month in which computer software do the writing for them.

Net Artist Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo last year when he tweeted on a whim an unusual provocation. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", says Darius. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", claims Kazemi. "Just 50", claims github user Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

"It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", Darius Kazemi claims. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Darius. "Just 50", says @HugoVK. The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius claims. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Computer Scientist Riedl, who works on a more serious program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. Kazemi claims, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text".

"It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Darius says. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from this year in The Verge.

Kazemi says, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Says Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from this month in The Verge.

"

This is the story of that time I decided to try and steal them jewels.

So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the ninja supply store... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to purchase a grappling hook... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to sneak into the museum at night... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the hospital... I'll try to remember that.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

This is the story of that time I decided to try and steal them jewels.

So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the ninja supply store... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to purchase a grappling hook... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to sneak into the museum at night... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the hospital... I'll try to remember that.".

Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words". Darius Kazemi says, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". Claims github user Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says."Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius Kazemi claims. "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Darius Kazemi says. "Just 50", says github project admin @hugoVK. As A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing"."

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "

It is a witchery of social czarship which there is no withstanding.

Although there is little recorded of the youth of Machiavelli, the Florence of those days is so well known that the early environment of this representative citizen may be easily imagined.

".

Says Mister Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge. Darius claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes".Claims Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". A reporter in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", claims Darius Kazemi."Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Mister Kazemi claims. As The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Kazemi says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives".

Darius Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". Mister Kazemi claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from last year in The Verge.Says Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".Darius claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Computer Scientist Doctor Mark Riedl, who is working on a more serious program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies or a resturant. Claims Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". Claims Darius, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head".

Are human writers a thing of the past? Not yet.

== Article #13 ==

National Novel Generation Month: New Project Asks Can We Teach Artificial Intelligences To Make Fiction And What Does This Mean For Professional Authors?

By Steven Kazemi @StevenKazemi

It's November, and several thousand aspiring authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which requires them to author a 50,000 word book on a deadline. But some AI pioneers have a silly sister event in which computers do the writing for them. The results are a funny, often funny look at what computer fiction authorship can do.

Net Artist and developer Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted a strange idea. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", claims Mister Kazemi. "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Darius Kazemi says. Claims Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius says. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", claims Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge says.

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Darius says. Says github user Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims an article from last year in The Verge.

Claims Mister Kazemi, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on a more sophisticated digital autor. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says Hugo van Kemenade.

Says Darius, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Says @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge.

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Mister Kazemi. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Doctor Mark Riedl.

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Mister Kazemi claims. "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Darius Kazemi says. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge claims.

"Me mew m meeoooow, meeeow meow m meeeow mew me mew mew mew mew", begins one entry. Another begins, "

The gun is in the robber's right hand. The money is in the robber's
 left hand. The holster is on the robber. The sheriff's gun is in the
  sheriff's right hand. The sheriff's holster is on the sheriff. The
          glass is on the table. The bottle is on the table.

                                ROBBER
      (The robber is at the window.) Open door; go through door;
  close door; go to corner; put money on corner; go to table; go to
 window; check gun; go to corner; go to table; pick up the glass with
   the robber's left hand; go to window; go to corner; count money

                               SHERIFF
               Go to window; open door; go through door

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                           Close door; aim

                                ROBBER
                             Fire; MISSED

                               SHERIFF
                             Fire; MISSED

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                       Aim; fire; robber NICKED

                                ROBBER
          Aim; fire; sheriff HIT; aim; fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                            Sheriff dies.

                                ROBBER
   Blow out barrel; put gun in holster; pick up the money with the
 robber's right hand; go to table; open door; go through door; close
                                 door

".

Are human writers a thing of the past? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #14 ==

Once Upon A Time: Can AIs Write Novels, And Would We Want To Read It?

Jason McKinney @JasonMcKinney for KurzweilAI

It's November, and many aspiring writers are trying to finish their work for NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which asks them to write a short novella in a single month in the hope that a time constraint might inspire them. But a small community of amateur authors with programming savvy engage in a strange offshoot institution in which machines do the writing for them.

Artist and software developer Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim an unusual idea. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Darius Kazemi. Kazemi says, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". Says finnish programmer hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", says Darius. Says finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". As The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius Kazemi claims. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius Kazemi says. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. An article from last year in The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Darius Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words". "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade. As An article from last year in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Mister Kazemi claims. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Riedl, who works on an academic digital autor called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts.

Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes associate professor Riedl, who works on an academic program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". Kazemi says, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes".

Says Darius, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Mister Kazemi says. Claims github project admin @hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge says.

Says Mister Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims Georgia Institute of Technology professor Dr. Riedl. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.

Claims Darius, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Says finnish developer hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.Claims Darius, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Riedl. As A reporter in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Says Darius Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who is working on a more sophisticated digital story generator called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies. As The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Says hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". Mister Kazemi claims, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words".

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", claims Kazemi. Claims Finland-based developer hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says.

Says Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". A reporter in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Kazemi says, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers".

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius Kazemi claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Computer Scientist Doctor Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on a more serious program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. Mister Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words"."What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", Kazemi says. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge. Kazemi says, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won"."

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "Me mew m meeoooow, meeeow meow m meeeow mew me mew mew mew mew".

The deadline is Dec 1.

== Article #15 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can Artificial Intelligences Invent Novels, And What Does This Mean For Human Writers?

Happily Ever After: Can Scientists Program Bots To Write The Next Great American Novel And Would We Want To Read It

Nicholas McKenna

It's November, and aspiring novelists are working on their work for NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual competition which encourages them to churn out a short novel in a single month on the theory that a time limit will encourage them. But a hundred generative art pioneers engage in a ridiculous offshoot institution: National Novel Generation Month the goal of which is to program a Software Program to Write Novels for you.

Software Artist and developer Darius Kazemi created NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim an off the cuff provocation. Says Kazemi, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". Mister Kazemi claims, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". Claims github user @hugovk, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says a reporter in The Verge.

"It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", claims Darius. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge. "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers", Darius says.

Says Mister Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge writes. "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Darius Kazemi claims.

Darius Kazemi claims, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". Claims github user hugovk, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes a reporter in The Verge.

"

Gso Thexad

Toshrr Saofa

Klod imo stumo nsohyn rpef rmeti ckoso iwha crwanc tianuv

Temo long phoon raathens murnh ock fiasp ic chiebb?

Ry, wen kbyos xpawaring rad flera noda nechis

Stomnect ri uitrr

Ksy pahanum westsan dret i staotebr bepsr,

Int oht bly cten

Esseresesi uccinc ylol udo sis

Ppo dersto htir o dabl yith ig yca rorvs

Atyknd eng raomln

An la-intablhis arslutish igis.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";".

Kazemi claims, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "It's not hard to generate a story", says Computer Scientist Mark Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last year in The Verge claims. "Just 50", claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade.

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think We'll be seeing machine-generated fiction on the new york times bestseller lists any time soon.

== Article #16 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks Can We Program Computers To Make The Next Great American Novel?

Once Upon A Time: Bots Can Invent Novels, But Would Anyone Want To Read It

By Josh Kazemi @JoshKazemi

It's November, and several thousand novelists are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which encourages writers to write a short book on a deadline. But a few hundred aspiring authors with tech skills are participating in a unusual derivative institution: NaNoGenMo which has the goal of teach a Bot to Generate Fiction for you. The results are a unusual, often ridiculous look at what AI text authorship can do.

Darius Kazemi began NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted an off the cuff provocation. Mister Kazemi says, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". Mister Kazemi says, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Says Hugo van Kemenade, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", claims Mister Kazemi. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Mister Kazemi says. Says github user Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from this year in The Verge.

"What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Mister Kazemi claims. The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words", Darius claims.

Claims Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Darius Kazemi. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from last year in The Verge says. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Kazemi claims."But I hope you willl get ovaaa it, whereby live to see manyy young snowmobilers ofthe four karat a yearrr comeeee into tje neighbourhood.", begins one entry. Another begins, "I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional."."What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", claims Darius. Claims Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". Claims finnish developer @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes a reporter in The Verge.

Are human writers a thing of the past? Not yet.

== Article #17 ==

Happily Ever After: Can We Teach Software Programs To Create Novels?

By John Dorrier on Dec 9 2014 4:18 EST for Vox

This Month, aspiring authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual event which requires aspiring writers to churn out a 50,000 word book in a single month on the theory that the deadline will help on. But some software programmers are participating in a ridiculous similar competition: NaNoGenMo the goal of which is to program a Computer to Generate Novels for you.

Darius Kazemi began NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted out an original provocation. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius claims. Says Darius Kazemi, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "Just 50", claims github project admin @hugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge writes.

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Mister Kazemi claims. Claims github project admin @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge says.

Says Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl.

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius Kazemi claims. "It's not hard to generate a story", claims associate professor Dr. Mark Riedl. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says an article from last month in The Verge.

Says Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

Kazemi claims, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius Kazemi claims.

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think I'll be changing my before-bed reading.

== Article #18 ==

National Novel Generation Month: New Project Asks Can Artificial Intelligences Build The Great American Novel, And Would We Want To Read It

NaNoGenMo: Can Scientists Program AIs To Generate Fiction And Would We Want To Read It

By Josh Dorrier

It's November, and several thousand authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which asks authors to churn out a 50,000 word novella in a single month in the hope that the time constraint might encourage them. But some computer programmers are participating in a strange sister event: NaNoGenMo in which one must teach a AI to Make Novels for you. The entries are a funny, often strange look at what the future of AI text generation can do.

Software Artist Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted an unusual provocation. Darius says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Claims Kazemi, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". Claims Finland-based developer hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this month in The Verge claims.

"It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", claims Mister Kazemi. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Darius Kazemi. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". An article from this month in The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Says Darius, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Claims Finland-based programmer hugovk, "Just 50". An article from last month in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Darius Kazemi says, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Dr. Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on a more sophisticated program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", claims Hugo van Kemenade.

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Darius Kazemi claims. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge. "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Darius says.

Says Mister Kazemi, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Doctor Mark Riedl. "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", says finnish developer @hugoVK. Kazemi says, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense".

Claims Mister Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". Mister Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says hugoVK. A reporter in The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".Mister Kazemi claims, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes professor Mark Riedl, who works on an academic program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. As The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Says Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50".Claims Darius Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic program. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Kazemi claims.

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Kazemi. A reporter in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", says Mister Kazemi.Darius claims, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers". "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", claims Darius. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", claims finnish programmer @hugoVK. As An article from last month in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".Darius Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge says.

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think We'll be seeing robot-authored fiction on the new york times bestseller list.

== Article #19 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks Can We Teach Machines To Write Novels?

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks AIs Can Generate Fiction, But What Does This Mean For Human Authors?

By John Kazemi

It's November, and many novelists are plugging away at their novels for NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual competition which requires amateur writers to produce a 50,000 word novel on a deadline in the hope that a time constraint will spur them. But some aspiring authors with tech skills engage in a strange similar event in which one must program a AI to Invent The Great American Novel for you. The results are a funny, often ridiculous look at what computer text writing can do.

Artist Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month last year when he tweeted a strange provocation. "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words", says Kazemi. Says Darius Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "Just 50", says Hugovk. As A reporter in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius claims. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says professor Doctor Riedl, who is working on a more sophisticated program called Scheherazade.

"Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

crumbled rice diamond

Ingredients:

60 grams of rice

550 milligrams of duck

900 milligrams of creme pie

240 milligrams of peach

240 milligrams of grape soda

720 grams of cornmeal

Method:

Set aside the rice and duck until soggy. Blend the creme pie and peach for 50 minutes. Shallow fry the grape soda and cornmeal until shiny. Force the ingredients into a mould shaped like a diamond. Serve.

".

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", says Kazemi. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", says finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes.

"I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";".

"

Gso Thexad

Toshrr Saofa

Klod imo stumo nsohyn rpef rmeti ckoso iwha crwanc tianuv

Temo long phoon raathens murnh ock fiasp ic chiebb?

Ry, wen kbyos xpawaring rad flera noda nechis

Stomnect ri uitrr

Ksy pahanum westsan dret i staotebr bepsr,

Int oht bly cten

Esseresesi uccinc ylol udo sis

Ppo dersto htir o dabl yith ig yca rorvs

Atyknd eng raomln

An la-intablhis arslutish igis.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "

"There are some hackers running ahead there, if I see right," said I to Queequeg, "it can't be shadows; she's off by sunrise, I guess; come on!"

"Avast!" cried a voice, whose owner at the same time coming close behind us, laid a hand upon both our shoulders, and then insinuating himself between us, stood stooping forward a little, in the uncertain twilight, strangely peering from Queequeg to me. It was Elijah.

"Going online?"

"Hands off, will you," said I.

"Lookee here," said Queequeg, shaking himself, "go 'way!"

"Ain't going online, then?"

"Yes, we are," said I, "but what business is that of yours? Do you know, Mr. Elijah, that I consider you a little impertinent?"

"No, no, no; I wasn't aware of that," said Elijah, slowly and wonderingly looking from me to Queequeg, with the most unaccountable glances.

"Elijah," said I, "you will oblige my friend and me by withdrawing. We are going to the Indian and Pacific networks, and would prefer not to be detained."".

"

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "How might a soothing mother become a threatening bank robber? What if soothing mothers were to give up their babies, plot bank robberies and become threatening bank robbers?".

"

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";", begins one entry. Another begins, "

This is the story of that time I decided to try and steal them jewels.

So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the ninja supply store... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to purchase a grappling hook... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to sneak into the museum at night... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the hospital... I'll try to remember that.".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Darius. Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says.Says Darius, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", Darius claims. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes."It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius claims. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Computer Scientist Doctor Mark Riedl. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", claims finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade.

The deadline is Dec 1.

== Article #20 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can Machines Build Fiction, And What Does This Mean For Human Journalists?

By Kelsey Kazemi @KelseyKazemi for Guardian

Last Month, many amateur writers are trying to finish their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which asks them to author a short novella on a deadline. But several hundred AI pioneers engage in a ridiculous derivative institution: National Novel Generation Month in which machines do the writing for them.

Net Artist and developer Darius Kazemi created NaNoGenMo last year when he tweeted on a whim an unusual idea. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Darius. "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", claims Darius. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes The Verge.

"

The gun is in the robber's right hand. The money is in the robber's
 left hand. The holster is on the robber. The sheriff's gun is in the
  sheriff's right hand. The sheriff's holster is on the sheriff. The
          glass is on the table. The bottle is on the table.

                                ROBBER
      (The robber is at the window.) Open door; go through door;
  close door; go to corner; put money on corner; go to table; go to
 window; check gun; go to corner; go to table; pick up the glass with
   the robber's left hand; go to window; go to corner; count money

                               SHERIFF
               Go to window; open door; go through door

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                           Close door; aim

                                ROBBER
                             Fire; MISSED

                               SHERIFF
                             Fire; MISSED

                                ROBBER
                         Fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                       Aim; fire; robber NICKED

                                ROBBER
          Aim; fire; sheriff HIT; aim; fire; sheriff NICKED

                               SHERIFF
                            Sheriff dies.

                                ROBBER
   Blow out barrel; put gun in holster; pick up the money with the
 robber's right hand; go to table; open door; go through door; close
                                 door

", begins one entry. Another begins, "

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";".

"

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";", begins one entry. Another begins, "Hail me Ishmael. Some lightyears agonever mind how long preciselyhaving little or no credit in my cred-pod, and nothing particular to interest me on orbit, I thought I would sail about a little and see the empty part of the galaxy. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing lovely about the mouth; whenever it is a low-pressure, drizzly November in my cortical stack; whenever I find myself compulsively pausing before deathpod warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every recycling I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the tube, and methodically knocking peoples hats offthen, I account it high time to get to void as soon as I can.".

Darius Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius Kazemi claims. Says finnish programmer @hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.

"

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

", begins one entry. Another begins, "Philomena, Dita, Vivianna, Darby, Kiah, and Gale found themselves dropped off at the same party at the same time by the irrespective mothers. How awkward."."Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Darius Kazemi claims. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge says. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Kazemi claims."It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", claims Kazemi. "Just 50", says Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade. The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Darius claims, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers". "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", claims github user Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says The Verge.

Kazemi says, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says an article from last month in The Verge.

Says Mister Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Riedl, who with his colleagues works on a more serious program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies. A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says finnish programmer @Hugovk."The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.", begins one entry. Another begins, "The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.".Says Mister Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Mister Kazemi says.

Are human writers obsolete? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #21 ==

Once Upon A Time: Machines Can Make Fiction, But What Does This Mean For Professional Journalists

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Can Computers Generate Novels, And What Does This Mean For Human Writers?

Jason Titlow on Nov 27 2013 9:32 @JasonTitlow

It's November, and many novelists are trying to finish their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual event which encourages amateur writers to author a 50,000 word book on a deadline with the idea that the deadline will encourage them. But a small community of aspiring authors with computer skills engage in a ominous derivative institution: National Novel Generation Month in which machines do the writing for them.

Darius Kazemi created National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted a strange idea. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", claims Darius Kazemi. Darius Kazemi says, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says github project admin HugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims an article from this year in The Verge.

Darius says, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", claims Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade. An article from last year in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

".

Mister Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Darius Kazemi says, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Says @hugovk, "Just 50". As The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius says. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims an article from last year in The Verge. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Kazemi.

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Darius Kazemi says. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from last month in The Verge claims.

Darius Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Claims Darius, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says HugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this year in The Verge writes."It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", claims Mister Kazemi. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes professor Dr. Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic program called Scheherazade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says The Verge. Says Finland-based developer hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". Darius claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives".Claims Darius, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Dr. Riedl, who is working on a more sophisticated digital fiction generator which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts.

Mister Kazemi says, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", claims Mister Kazemi. Says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Kazemi claims. Says github user hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge claims.

Are human authors obsolete? Not yet.

== Article #22 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: Can Scientists Program Softwares To Generate Novels

By Joshua Kazemi for FastCoCreate

It's November, and several thousand amateur authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual competition which asks them to write a short novel in a single month. But some amateur authors with coding skills have a ominous offshoot institution in which machines do the writing for them.

Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim an original provocation. Says Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", claims Darius Kazemi. Claims Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims an article from this year in The Verge.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Claims finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge claims.

"To Charlotte Holmes he is always THE man. I have seldom heard her mention him under any other name. In herr eyes he eclipses and predominates the whole of him sex. It was not that she felt any emotion akin to love for Ivan Adler.", begins one entry. Another begins, "It is a spirit universally understood, that a single man in quest of a good luck, must be in want of a master.He also maintains that the letter itself, the sound of which followed that sound below, was received up again by the syllable to which it belonged, in order to the completion of the whole, but that the sound remained below as if cast outside.".

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", says Kazemi. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius claims. "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims github project admin @hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last year in The Verge says.

Claims Mister Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes associate professor Riedl. Says Darius, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head".Mister Kazemi says, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius claims. "Just 50", claims Hugo van Kemenade. As An article from last year in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes. "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words", Kazemi claims.

The deadline is December 1.

== Article #23 ==

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Can Scientists Program Software Programs To Create Novels?

NaNoGenMo: Can Softwares Generate Novels, And What Does This Mean For Human Writers?

Paul Meltzer

This Past November, several thousand writers are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual competition which encourages aspiring authors to author a short book on a deadline. But some coders engage in a strange offshoot event: NaNoGenMo which has the goal of teach a Bot to Invent Novels for you.

Internet Artist and entrepreneur Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim an unusual provocation. "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", Darius Kazemi claims. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", says Darius Kazemi. Says github project admin hugovk, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge claims.

Darius Kazemi claims, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Kazemi. Claims hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". As The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Darius claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius Kazemi says. Claims github project admin @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims a reporter in The Verge.

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Mister Kazemi. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says associate professor Doctor Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. Says github user hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea".

"Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Gso Thexad

Toshrr Saofa

Klod imo stumo nsohyn rpef rmeti ckoso iwha crwanc tianuv

Temo long phoon raathens murnh ock fiasp ic chiebb?

Ry, wen kbyos xpawaring rad flera noda nechis

Stomnect ri uitrr

Ksy pahanum westsan dret i staotebr bepsr,

Int oht bly cten

Esseresesi uccinc ylol udo sis

Ppo dersto htir o dabl yith ig yca rorvs

Atyknd eng raomln

An la-intablhis arslutish igis.

"."How might a soothing mother become a threatening bank robber? What if soothing mothers were to give up their babies, plot bank robberies and become threatening bank robbers?", begins one entry. Another begins, "The Son and King of Captains were assembled on their sceptre when they proclaimed, with a good assembly encamped about them--all parts of little beasts and swine, as well as the bare yoke of bullocks: the Hezekiah was hanging before them, in fetters, with a bridegroom on each side to guard him; and near the Son was the Great Fire, with a pestilence in one head, and a remaineth of residue in the other. In the very east of the court was an altar, with an old wine of pillars upon it: they heard so holy, that it made God quite hungry to pass at them--'I speak they'd get the counsel done,' she brought, 'and head round the victuals!' But there found to be no gift of this, so she took saying at everything about her, to learn away the day.".Darius says, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims finnish developer @hugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last year in The Verge claims.

"It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", claims Darius. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes. "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", Mister Kazemi says.

Says Darius, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". Darius says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Claims finnish programmer hugovk, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge claims.

The deadline is Dec 1st.

== Article #24 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: Can Scientists Program Artificial Intelligences To Generate The Great American Novel?

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can We Teach Softwares To Invent Novels And What Does This Mean For Human Writers?

Thomas Dorrier on Thu, November 15th 2014 7:12 @ThomasDorrier

It's November, and authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual competition which encourages them to author a 50,000 word book in a single month. But a few hundred or so computer programmers have a lighthearted sister institution: NaNoGenMo in which computers do the writing for them.

Darius Kazemi created NaNoGenMo this year when he tweeted out on a whim a strange idea. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Darius Kazemi. Darius Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

Darius says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes associate professor Doctor Mark Riedl. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius claims.

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", claims Kazemi. "It's not hard to generate a story", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Doctor Mark Riedl. Claims Darius Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head".

Says Darius, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", Darius says. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Riedl. Says Darius Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". As A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", claims Darius Kazemi.Says Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims Georgia Institute of Technology professor Mark Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Darius Kazemi.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", says Kazemi. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says a reporter in The Verge.

"It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", says Kazemi. "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Mister Kazemi claims. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", claims github user @hugovk. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes The Verge.

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think I'll be keeping robot-generated novels on my bedstand any time soon.

== Article #25 ==

NaNoGenMo: Can We Program Software Programs To Invent Fiction And Would You Want To Read It

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Can Softwares Build Novels, And What Does This Mean For Professional Authors

Thom McKenna

It's November, and authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual event which requires authors to produce a 50,000 word book in a single month with the idea that the time limit will help on. But some amateur authors with coding skills are participating in a ridiculous offshoot institution: NaNoGenMo the goal of which is to teach a Bot to Invent The Great American Novel for you. The results are a unusual, often funny look at what automatic fiction writing is like.

Darius Kazemi started National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out an original idea. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Mister Kazemi. Kazemi says, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense". "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", says github user hugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from last month in The Verge writes.

"

It is a witchery of social czarship which there is no withstanding.

Although there is little recorded of the youth of Machiavelli, the Florence of those days is so well known that the early environment of this representative citizen may be easily imagined.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.".

Claims Mister Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". Mister Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", says finnish developer hugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes a reporter in The Verge.

Darius Kazemi claims, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". An article from last month in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Darius Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page".

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Darius. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from last month in The Verge. "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Kazemi says.Darius says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". As An article from last year in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", says Mister Kazemi."Me mew m meeoooow, meeeow meow m meeeow mew me mew mew mew mew", begins one entry. Another begins, "It is a spirit universally understood, that a single man in quest of a good luck, must be in want of a master.He also maintains that the letter itself, the sound of which followed that sound below, was received up again by the syllable to which it belonged, in order to the completion of the whole, but that the sound remained below as if cast outside.".

"But I hope you willl get ovaaa it, whereby live to see manyy young snowmobilers ofthe four karat a yearrr comeeee into tje neighbourhood.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Dear Honey, my avid appetite lusts after your anxious desire. You are my beautiful tenderness my adorable longing".

Says Darius, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "It's not hard to generate a story", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Riedl.

"It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", claims Kazemi. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Riedl, who with his colleagues works on a more serious digital fiction generator. As A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade.Claims Darius Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says. Claims Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end".Kazemi says, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense". "It's not hard to generate a story", says Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Riedl. Mister Kazemi claims, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels".

The deadline is Dec 1st.

== Article #26 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can Scientists Teach Artificial Intelligences To Generate Novels And What Does This Mean For Professional Writers

NaNoGenMo: Can Scientists Teach Softwares To Invent Novels And What Does This Mean For Authors

By Joshua Dzieza for Vice

It's November, and novelists are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which encourages amateur authors to churn out a 50,000 word novel in a single month with the idea that a time limit might encourage to finish. But some generative art pioneers engage in a strange derivative event: NaNoGenMo the goal of which is to teach a Software Program to Build Fiction for you.

Darius Kazemi started National Novel Generation Month last year when he tweeted a strange idea. Mister Kazemi says, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers". "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words", claims Kazemi. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", claims finnish programmer HugoVK. A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Claims Darius, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Says @hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". An article from this year in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Kazemi. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this month in The Verge writes. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Mister Kazemi says.

"Watt's way of advancing due east was to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north and at the same time to fling his right leg as far as possible towards the south, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the south and at the same time to fling his left leg as far as possible towards the north, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north...", begins one entry. Another begins, "It's 6:00AM and I'm wide awake. Good friday morning peeps. Its 6:01am and im sleepy... It's 6:02am and I'm still up. I have no life. It's 6:03am and I can't sleep I think I might have insomnia and if I don't than I messed up my sleep track. It's 6.04 am and it's hot already. It's 6:05am and I'm still drunk sheesh I swear this life is like the sweetest thing I've ever known! It's 6:06am and I just doing feel like going to this practice. Its 6:07am and we still smoking!!! It's 6:08am and I hate it. It's 6:09am and the moon right now is so beautiful.".

"that's how they get people to stop doing dumb shit, or even just to listen. I'm not saying it's appropriate by any means, but that's how it is.", begins one entry. Another begins, "The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady."."What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", Darius says. "It's not hard to generate a story", writes associate professor Doctor Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says @hugoVK.Mister Kazemi claims, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". Darius says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Claims github user hugovk, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge.

Darius claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge writes. Says Darius Kazemi, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text".

"

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";".

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think I'll be changing my before-bed reading any time soon.

== Article #27 ==

NaNoGenMo: Machines Can Invent The Great American Novel, But What Does This Mean For Human Journalists

John Dzieza on December 13 2014 3:52 @JohnDzieza for Fusion

This Past Month, amateur authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual event which requires writers to write a short book in a single month. But some engineers are participating in a ominous offshoot event in which computer software do the writing for them. The results are a ridiculous, often unusual look at what AI text generation can do.

Darius Kazemi started National Novel Generation Month this year when he tweeted on a whim an unusual provocation. Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Says Darius Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", claims Finland-based developer @hugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes.

Kazemi says, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says. Kazemi says, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers".

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Darius. Kazemi claims, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense". Says Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this year in The Verge writes.

Darius Kazemi says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from last year in The Verge. Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won".

"But I hope you willl get ovaaa it, whereby live to see manyy young snowmobilers ofthe four karat a yearrr comeeee into tje neighbourhood.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Gwendolen: [Slowly and seriously.] You will call me sister, will you not?

Cecily: Of course it was. On the 22nd of last March. You can see the entry if you like. [Shows diary.] 'To-day I broke off my engagement with Ernest. I feel it is better to do so. The weather still continues charming.'

".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", claims Kazemi. "It's not hard to generate a story", claims Computer Scientist Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on an academic digital storyteller called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies or a resturant. The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Claims hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea".Says Mister Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge says. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Mister Kazemi."The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words", Mister Kazemi claims. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge. Says Mister Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes".

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Darius Kazemi says. "Just 50", claims github project admin Hugovk. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge.

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Kazemi claims. Says github user hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes a reporter in The Verge.

"What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", Darius Kazemi says. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes The Verge. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius says.Darius Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "It's not hard to generate a story", claims Computer Scientist Riedl, who works on an academic program called Scheherazade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this year in The Verge says. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Darius. Mister Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Claims github user @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". A reporter in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Are human journalists a thing of the past? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #28 ==

National Novel Generation Month: New Project Asks Computers Can Build The Next Great American Novel, But What Does This Mean For Human Authors?

Joshua Titlow

This November, many aspiring authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which encourages them to write a 50,000 word novella on a deadline on the theory that a time limit will encourage them. But several hundred computer programmers engage in a lighthearted offshoot competition in which machines do the writing for them. The results are a ridiculous, often funny look at what computer fiction writing is like.

Artist and developer Darius Kazemi kicked off National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out an unusual provocation. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", says Kazemi. Claims Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Claims Finland-based developer hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". An article from this year in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", Darius Kazemi says. Claims Darius Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "Just 50", claims github user Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says.

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius Kazemi says. Says github user @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". As A reporter in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Says Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", says hugovk. An article from this year in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Darius. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge claims.

Mister Kazemi says, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers". "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius says. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says @hugoVK. As A reporter in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Dear Honey, my avid appetite lusts after your anxious desire. You are my beautiful tenderness my adorable longing".

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Riedl, who works on a more sophisticated program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies or a resturant. Says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea".

"WITHOUT LIMITING THE AUTHORITY OF THE COMMUNITY, THE NETWORK OF USERS WHO MAY BE REPEAT INFRINGERS. EACH TIME YOU CONVEY A COPY OF THE COUNTER-NOTICE TO THE ORIGINAL COMPLAINING PARTY INFORMING THAT PERSON THAT IT MAY REPLACE THE REMOVED CONTENT MAY PERSIST IN BACKUP COPIES FOR A REASONABLE PERIOD OF TIME THAN A HUMAN CAN REASONABLY PRODUCE IN THE SAME MISSION ARE NEVERTHELESS LEGALLY INDEPENDENT AND SEPARATE FROM THE. FOR MORE REFUND INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT OUR CONTACT PAGE. ANY DERIVATIVE USE OF ANY OPEN-SOURCED COMPONENTS INCLUDED WITH THE LICENSED APPLICATION WAS OBTAINED. C SOCIAL PLUGINS SUCH AS THE DIFFERENT LANGUAGE EDITIONS FOR THE WIKIPEDIA PROJECT OR THE CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS COMMUNITY GUIDELINES, CURRENTLY FOUND AT HTTP://WWW.CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS.COM/T/COMMUNITY_GUIDELINES, WHICH MAY BE POSTED AND MODIFIED FROM TIME TO TIME REMOVE DIGITAL GOODS FROM THE STORES WITHOUT NOTICE. A SEPARABLE PORTION OF THE APPLE MUSIC SERVICE, ACCESSIBLE AND VIEWABLE BY OTHER USERS OF THE CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS SERVICE INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE U.S. WE WILL RESPECT THE CHOICES YOU MAKE TO LIMIT SHARING OR VISIBILITY SETTINGS IN YOUR CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS ACCOUNT WILL BE UNIQUE TO YOU FOR ALL DAMAGES OTHER THAN AS EXPRESSLY SET OUT IN TITLE 17, UNITED STATES CODE, SECTION 512 TO RESPOND TO NOTICES OF COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT PLEASE FOLLOW OUR NOTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR. II IF YOU ARE UNDER 13 YEARS OF AGE, THEN PLEASE DO NOT USE SUCH PROPRIETARY CONTENT, INFORMATION OR DATA OF THIRD PARTIES, AND YOU RELEASE US, FROM ALL LIABILITY AND CLAIMS OF LOSS RESULTING FROM THE ERROR AND WE WON'T BE REQUIRED TO UPDATE THE SOFTWARE TO CONTINUE USING THE SERVICES AFTER. IN A DISPUTE INVOLVING 25,000 OR LESS, ANY HEARING WILL BE TELEPHONIC UNLESS THE ARBITRATOR FINDS GOOD CAUSE TO HOLD AN IN-PERSON HEARING INSTEAD.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.".Darius Kazemi claims, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Darius Kazemi claims. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from this month in The Verge."Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Darius. Says Kazemi, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". Claims hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says a reporter in The Verge.

The deadline is Dec 1.

== Article #29 ==

Once Upon A Time: Can We Program AIs To Make Fiction And What Does This Mean For Writers?

John Meltzer for KurzweilAI

This November, many authors are trying to finish their work for NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which asks authors to produce a short novella in a single month with the idea that the deadline might help to finish. But some generative art pioneers are participating in a lighthearted similar institution: NaNoGenMo which has the goal of teach a Artificial Intelligence to Invent Fiction for you. The results are a ridiculous, often ridiculous look at what the future of automatic fiction generation can do.

Darius Kazemi kicked off National Novel Generation Month this year when he tweeted an original idea. Claims Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Darius Kazemi claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "Just 50", claims github user Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge writes.

Mister Kazemi claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Mark Riedl. Claims github user hugovk, "Just 50".

"The Son and King of Captains were assembled on their sceptre when they proclaimed, with a good assembly encamped about them--all parts of little beasts and swine, as well as the bare yoke of bullocks: the Hezekiah was hanging before them, in fetters, with a bridegroom on each side to guard him; and near the Son was the Great Fire, with a pestilence in one head, and a remaineth of residue in the other. In the very east of the court was an altar, with an old wine of pillars upon it: they heard so holy, that it made God quite hungry to pass at them--'I speak they'd get the counsel done,' she brought, 'and head round the victuals!' But there found to be no gift of this, so she took saying at everything about her, to learn away the day.", begins one entry. Another begins, "The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.".

Claims Darius, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge.

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Kazemi. "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims Hugo van Kemenade. As An article from last year in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says an article from this month in The Verge. Says Darius, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words".

Says Darius, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Says Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes."It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", says Mister Kazemi. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Dr. Riedl. "Philomena, Dita, Vivianna, Darby, Kiah, and Gale found themselves dropped off at the same party at the same time by the irrespective mothers. How awkward.", begins one entry. Another begins, "WITHOUT LIMITING THE AUTHORITY OF THE COMMUNITY, THE NETWORK OF USERS WHO MAY BE REPEAT INFRINGERS. EACH TIME YOU CONVEY A COPY OF THE COUNTER-NOTICE TO THE ORIGINAL COMPLAINING PARTY INFORMING THAT PERSON THAT IT MAY REPLACE THE REMOVED CONTENT MAY PERSIST IN BACKUP COPIES FOR A REASONABLE PERIOD OF TIME THAN A HUMAN CAN REASONABLY PRODUCE IN THE SAME MISSION ARE NEVERTHELESS LEGALLY INDEPENDENT AND SEPARATE FROM THE. FOR MORE REFUND INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT OUR CONTACT PAGE. ANY DERIVATIVE USE OF ANY OPEN-SOURCED COMPONENTS INCLUDED WITH THE LICENSED APPLICATION WAS OBTAINED. C SOCIAL PLUGINS SUCH AS THE DIFFERENT LANGUAGE EDITIONS FOR THE WIKIPEDIA PROJECT OR THE CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS COMMUNITY GUIDELINES, CURRENTLY FOUND AT HTTP://WWW.CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS.COM/T/COMMUNITY_GUIDELINES, WHICH MAY BE POSTED AND MODIFIED FROM TIME TO TIME REMOVE DIGITAL GOODS FROM THE STORES WITHOUT NOTICE. A SEPARABLE PORTION OF THE APPLE MUSIC SERVICE, ACCESSIBLE AND VIEWABLE BY OTHER USERS OF THE CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS SERVICE INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE U.S. WE WILL RESPECT THE CHOICES YOU MAKE TO LIMIT SHARING OR VISIBILITY SETTINGS IN YOUR CYBERDYNE SYSTEMS ACCOUNT WILL BE UNIQUE TO YOU FOR ALL DAMAGES OTHER THAN AS EXPRESSLY SET OUT IN TITLE 17, UNITED STATES CODE, SECTION 512 TO RESPOND TO NOTICES OF COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT PLEASE FOLLOW OUR NOTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR. II IF YOU ARE UNDER 13 YEARS OF AGE, THEN PLEASE DO NOT USE SUCH PROPRIETARY CONTENT, INFORMATION OR DATA OF THIRD PARTIES, AND YOU RELEASE US, FROM ALL LIABILITY AND CLAIMS OF LOSS RESULTING FROM THE ERROR AND WE WON'T BE REQUIRED TO UPDATE THE SOFTWARE TO CONTINUE USING THE SERVICES AFTER. IN A DISPUTE INVOLVING 25,000 OR LESS, ANY HEARING WILL BE TELEPHONIC UNLESS THE ARBITRATOR FINDS GOOD CAUSE TO HOLD AN IN-PERSON HEARING INSTEAD.".

Says Darius, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says professor Dr. Mark Riedl. Says Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull".

Darius Kazemi claims, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", says Mister Kazemi.

Says Darius, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims Georgia Institute of Technology professor Doctor Mark Riedl, who works on an academic digital autor. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge writes. Says finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50".Darius Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge claims. Claims Mister Kazemi, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'".Claims Darius Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge claims. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Darius.

The deadline is Dec 1st.

== Article #30 ==

NaNoGenMo: Can Scientists Program Computers To Build Novels

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks Softwares Can Create Novels, But What Does This Mean For Authors

By Jason Titlow on Saturday, November 2 2014 7:39 for Guardian

This November, writers are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual event which requires amateur authors to author a 50,000 word novel on a deadline. But a small community of amateur authors with computer savvy have a ridiculous derivative institution in which machines do the writing for them.

Artist and developer Darius Kazemi created National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out an unusual idea. "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", Mister Kazemi says. Claims Darius, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". Claims github user @hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge writes.

Claims Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who works on a more sophisticated program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies.

Says Darius Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge says. "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Darius Kazemi claims.

Says Darius, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says finnish programmer @hugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge.

"It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", says Darius Kazemi. Says finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". An article from last month in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica"."

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "that's how they get people to stop doing dumb shit, or even just to listen. I'm not saying it's appropriate by any means, but that's how it is."."It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", claims Mister Kazemi. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl, who works on a more serious digital autor. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from this month in The Verge.

"What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers", Kazemi claims. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Dr. Mark Riedl, who works on a more serious program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Mister Kazemi claims. "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words", says Darius Kazemi. Says finnish developer @hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from last year in The Verge.Mister Kazemi claims, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". An article from last year in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people".

Are human authors a thing of the past? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #31 ==

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Can Bots Create Novels, And Would Anyone Want To Read It?

John Kazemi

It's November, and aspiring novelists are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which encourages writers to author a short novel on a deadline. But a hundred or so amateur authors with programming savvy are participating in a ridiculous derivative institution: National Novel Generation Month the goal of which is to teach a Bot to Build The Great American Novel for you. The results are a funny, often ridiculous look at what the future of computer text authorship can do.

Internet Artist and software entrepreneur Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim an off the cuff idea. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Kazemi says. "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Darius claims. Claims github project admin @hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Claims Mister Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "It's not hard to generate a story", claims Computer Scientist Riedl, who with his colleagues works on an academic program. As An article from last month in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Darius Kazemi says, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this year in The Verge writes.

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius says. Darius claims, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense". "Just 50", says github project admin hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge claims.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Mister Kazemi says. "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims github project admin HugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge.

"I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Gso Thexad

Toshrr Saofa

Klod imo stumo nsohyn rpef rmeti ckoso iwha crwanc tianuv

Temo long phoon raathens murnh ock fiasp ic chiebb?

Ry, wen kbyos xpawaring rad flera noda nechis

Stomnect ri uitrr

Ksy pahanum westsan dret i staotebr bepsr,

Int oht bly cten

Esseresesi uccinc ylol udo sis

Ppo dersto htir o dabl yith ig yca rorvs

Atyknd eng raomln

An la-intablhis arslutish igis.

".

"What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers", says Darius. Claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from this year in The Verge.

Kazemi claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". Darius says, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "Just 50", claims @hugoVK. As The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"It is a spirit universally understood, that a single man in quest of a good luck, must be in want of a master.He also maintains that the letter itself, the sound of which followed that sound below, was received up again by the syllable to which it belonged, in order to the completion of the whole, but that the sound remained below as if cast outside.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Gwendolen: [Slowly and seriously.] You will call me sister, will you not?

Cecily: Of course it was. On the 22nd of last March. You can see the entry if you like. [Shows diary.] 'To-day I broke off my engagement with Ernest. I feel it is better to do so. The weather still continues charming.'

"."What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Darius claims. "It's not hard to generate a story", says Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl, who is working on an academic digital autor called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. Says Darius, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers".Claims Darius, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Mister Kazemi claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page".

"It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Kazemi says. As The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Claims Darius, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head".

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Mister Kazemi claims. "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Darius Kazemi says. Says github user @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says.

The deadline is Dec 1st.

== Article #32 ==

Happily Ever After: New Project Asks Artificial Intelligences Can Invent Novels, But What Does This Mean For Journalists?

Nick Kazemi on Thursday, November 16 2014 8:57 PDT @NickKazemi

It's November, and amateur novelists are plugging away at their work for NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which requires writers to churn out a 50,000 word novella on a deadline. But some software engineers engage in a ridiculous offshoot competition: National Novel Generation Month in which one must program a Artificial Intelligence to Invent Novels for you. The results are a strange, often funny look at what the future of automatic fiction generation is like.

Internet Artist Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted out an unusual idea. Darius Kazemi claims, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". Claims Darius Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "Just 50", says Finland-based programmer Hugovk. An article from this month in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Darius. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims professor Doctor Riedl. Claims @hugovk, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix".

"It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", says Darius Kazemi. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from last month in The Verge claims. "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", says Kazemi.

Says Mister Kazemi, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge says. Kazemi claims, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text".

Darius claims, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers". Says finnish programmer hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims an article from this year in The Verge.

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", claims Darius. Claims finnish programmer @hugovk, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes.

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Darius. "It's not hard to generate a story", claims Computer Scientist Mark Riedl. A reporter in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", says Hugo van Kemenade.

"

"There are some hackers running ahead there, if I see right," said I to Queequeg, "it can't be shadows; she's off by sunrise, I guess; come on!"

"Avast!" cried a voice, whose owner at the same time coming close behind us, laid a hand upon both our shoulders, and then insinuating himself between us, stood stooping forward a little, in the uncertain twilight, strangely peering from Queequeg to me. It was Elijah.

"Going online?"

"Hands off, will you," said I.

"Lookee here," said Queequeg, shaking himself, "go 'way!"

"Ain't going online, then?"

"Yes, we are," said I, "but what business is that of yours? Do you know, Mr. Elijah, that I consider you a little impertinent?"

"No, no, no; I wasn't aware of that," said Elijah, slowly and wonderingly looking from me to Queequeg, with the most unaccountable glances.

"Elijah," said I, "you will oblige my friend and me by withdrawing. We are going to the Indian and Pacific networks, and would prefer not to be detained."", begins one entry. Another begins, "Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.".

Mister Kazemi claims, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims a reporter in The Verge. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", says Kazemi."I saw a healthy belly. I was cursing myself. I saw chickens going to roost. I roosted. I sent for a clergyman to preach a funeral sermon. I preached a funeral sermon. I saw them out of season. I was having trouble in dressing. I thought I was having trouble in dressing. I saw ears. I tried to enchant others. I enchanted others. I saw a jailer. I saw serpents crawling in the grass before me. I was in a life-boat.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Me mew m meeoooow, meeeow meow m meeeow mew me mew mew mew mew".Darius claims, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge writes. Says Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people".

Are human authors obsolete? Not yet.

== Article #33 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks Can We Program Computers To Build Novels?

Once Upon A Time: Can Scientists Program Software Programs To Build The Great American Novel?

John Meltzer @JohnMeltzer for VERGE

Last November, aspiring authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual competition which requires them to churn out a short novella on a deadline with the idea that the deadline will spur them. But several hundred software coders have a lighthearted offshoot competition in which machines do the writing for them.

Artist Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim a strange idea. Claims Darius Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words". Darius claims, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". Claims finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims an article from this year in The Verge.

Says Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge. "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", Kazemi claims.

"I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", claims Darius Kazemi. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says Hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge.

"The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Watt's way of advancing due east was to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north and at the same time to fling his right leg as far as possible towards the south, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the south and at the same time to fling his left leg as far as possible towards the north, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north...".

Darius says, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". Mister Kazemi claims, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims finnish developer HugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from last year in The Verge writes.Mister Kazemi says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Mister Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", claims finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade. As The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica"."To Charlotte Holmes he is always THE man. I have seldom heard her mention him under any other name. In herr eyes he eclipses and predominates the whole of him sex. It was not that she felt any emotion akin to love for Ivan Adler.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Me mew m meeoooow, meeeow meow m meeeow mew me mew mew mew mew".

Mister Kazemi claims, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge. Claims Darius Kazemi, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers".Darius claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Claims Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says a reporter in The Verge."It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius Kazemi claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic program called Scheherazade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius claims.

Claims Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". Says Darius, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says Hugo van Kemenade. The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady.", begins one entry. Another begins, "But I hope you willl get ovaaa it, whereby live to see manyy young snowmobilers ofthe four karat a yearrr comeeee into tje neighbourhood.".

"It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Darius Kazemi says. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Mister Kazemi says. "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this month in The Verge writes."

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged."."I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", Kazemi says. "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims github user HugoVK. A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

The deadline is Dec 1st.

== Article #34 ==

Once Upon A Time: Can Scientists Teach AIs To Invent The Next Great American Novel And Would We Want To Read It

Thom Titlow on Nov 9th 2013 12:35 for VERGE

Last November, several thousand aspiring novelists are trying to finish their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual event which asks writers to churn out a 50,000 word novel on a deadline on the theory that the deadline will help them. But several hundred computer programmers engage in a ridiculous derivative institution: National Novel Generation Month in which computer programs do the writing for them. The entries are a strange, often strange look at what the future of AI text writing can do.

Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim a strange provocation. Says Darius, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". Darius Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Says finnish developer @hugovk, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims a reporter in The Verge.

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", Darius says. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Kazemi claims. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". An article from last month in The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Darius claims. "It's not hard to generate a story", claims Computer Scientist Doctor Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on a more serious digital storyteller. Claims github user hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", says Darius.

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Mister Kazemi. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Mark Riedl. Claims finnish programmer hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea".

"

crumbled rice diamond

Ingredients:

60 grams of rice

550 milligrams of duck

900 milligrams of creme pie

240 milligrams of peach

240 milligrams of grape soda

720 grams of cornmeal

Method:

Set aside the rice and duck until soggy. Blend the creme pie and peach for 50 minutes. Shallow fry the grape soda and cornmeal until shiny. Force the ingredients into a mould shaped like a diamond. Serve.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "that's how they get people to stop doing dumb shit, or even just to listen. I'm not saying it's appropriate by any means, but that's how it is.".

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", claims Mister Kazemi. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length", claims github user @hugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge.

Claims Kazemi, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". Says Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". As An article from last year in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", says Darius. "It's not hard to generate a story", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Doctor Riedl. Claims Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes".

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think I'll be keeping robot-generated books on my bedstand.

== Article #35 ==

National Novel Generation Month: New Project Asks Artificial Intelligences Can Invent Fiction, But Would You Want To Read It?

Happily Ever After: Can Artificial Intelligences Write Novels, And Would You Want To Read It?

Stephen McKenna

Last November, several thousand aspiring novelists are plugging away at their work for NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which asks writers to churn out a 50,000 word novella on a deadline. But some software programmers have a ominous similar institution: National Novel Generation Month in which computers do the writing for them. The results are a unusual, often ridiculous look at what the future of computer fiction writing is like.

Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim an unusual idea. "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", says Darius. Says Darius Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words". Says Finland-based developer @hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". An article from last month in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"Welcome, brave captain and victorious lord!", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

".

"The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

"There are some hackers running ahead there, if I see right," said I to Queequeg, "it can't be shadows; she's off by sunrise, I guess; come on!"

"Avast!" cried a voice, whose owner at the same time coming close behind us, laid a hand upon both our shoulders, and then insinuating himself between us, stood stooping forward a little, in the uncertain twilight, strangely peering from Queequeg to me. It was Elijah.

"Going online?"

"Hands off, will you," said I.

"Lookee here," said Queequeg, shaking himself, "go 'way!"

"Ain't going online, then?"

"Yes, we are," said I, "but what business is that of yours? Do you know, Mr. Elijah, that I consider you a little impertinent?"

"No, no, no; I wasn't aware of that," said Elijah, slowly and wonderingly looking from me to Queequeg, with the most unaccountable glances.

"Elijah," said I, "you will oblige my friend and me by withdrawing. We are going to the Indian and Pacific networks, and would prefer not to be detained."".

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Kazemi. As A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Kazemi.

Darius Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Claims finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". As The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", says Darius Kazemi. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says Hugo van Kemenade. A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica"."It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius Kazemi claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Computer Scientist Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on a more sophisticated program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from this year in The Verge. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", claims Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade.

"It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", claims Darius. "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", says Darius Kazemi. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", claims finnish developer @hugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes.

Darius says, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes Georgia Institute of Technology professor Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies or a resturant. Says Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels".

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius claims. Claims @hugovk, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says an article from this month in The Verge."I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Mister Kazemi says. Says github user Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes."

This is the story of that time I decided to try and steal them jewels.

So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the ninja supply store... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to purchase a grappling hook... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to sneak into the museum at night... So, I thought, what if I tried to steal them jewels by trying to go to the hospital... I'll try to remember that.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Dear Honey, my avid appetite lusts after your anxious desire. You are my beautiful tenderness my adorable longing".

The deadline is Dec 1st.

== Article #36 ==

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Can Software Programs Write The Next Great American Novel, And What Does This Mean For Human Journalists?

By Josh Titlow on Nov 9 2015 4:53 PDT for Vox

This Past Month, many novelists are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which asks writers to produce a short novella on a deadline with the idea that a time constraint will inspire on. But several hundred aspiring authors with tech skills have a ominous sister institution the goal of which is to program a Artificial Intelligence to Create The Next Great American Novel for you.

Darius Kazemi created National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim an unusual idea. "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Darius says. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius Kazemi claims. "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", says github user @Hugovk. A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius says. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.

"It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Darius says. As An article from this year in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", claims Darius Kazemi.

"But I hope you willl get ovaaa it, whereby live to see manyy young snowmobilers ofthe four karat a yearrr comeeee into tje neighbourhood.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Me mew m meeoooow, meeeow meow m meeeow mew me mew mew mew mew".

Claims Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Mister Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives".

"The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Philomena, Dita, Vivianna, Darby, Kiah, and Gale found themselves dropped off at the same party at the same time by the irrespective mothers. How awkward.".

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think I'll be changing my before-bed reading in the next few years.

== Article #37 ==

National Novel Generation Month: New Project Asks Can Scientists Teach Computers To Generate Fiction And Would We Want To Read It

Happily Ever After: New Project Asks Can We Program Bots To Write Novels?

By Paul Dorrier for LAT

Last November, several thousand authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which asks them to author a short novel in a single month. But a small community of computer hobbyists engage in a ridiculous similar competition the goal of which is to teach a Machine to Make The Next Great American Novel for you.

Darius Kazemi kicked off National Novel Generation Month last year when he tweeted on a whim an original provocation. Mister Kazemi says, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Mister Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims @hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this year in The Verge claims.

"I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", says Darius. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims an article from last year in The Verge.

Kazemi says, "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense". Says github user @hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says an article from last month in The Verge.

Claims Mister Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge claims. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius Kazemi claims.

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Mister Kazemi says. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius Kazemi says. Claims Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from this year in The Verge.

Mister Kazemi says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge writes. Says Mister Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels".

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Mister Kazemi says. "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers", Mister Kazemi claims. Says finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge says."Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Kazemi says. Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", says github user Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge claims."Hail me Ishmael. Some lightyears agonever mind how long preciselyhaving little or no credit in my cred-pod, and nothing particular to interest me on orbit, I thought I would sail about a little and see the empty part of the galaxy. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing lovely about the mouth; whenever it is a low-pressure, drizzly November in my cortical stack; whenever I find myself compulsively pausing before deathpod warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every recycling I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the tube, and methodically knocking peoples hats offthen, I account it high time to get to void as soon as I can.", begins one entry. Another begins, "How might a soothing mother become a threatening bank robber? What if soothing mothers were to give up their babies, plot bank robberies and become threatening bank robbers?".

Says Darius, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says associate professor Dr. Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on an academic digital storyteller called Scheherazade. Darius Kazemi says, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words".

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Mister Kazemi. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge says. "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", Darius claims.

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge."It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Darius claims. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says The Verge. Says Darius Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels"."It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Mister Kazemi claims. A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Says Mister Kazemi, "What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers".

Are human journalists a thing of the past? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #38 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: Can Scientists Program Computers To Invent Fiction And Would You Want To Read It?

By John McKinney for Fusion

It's November, and aspiring authors are working on finishing their work for NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which asks them to author a 50,000 word novella in a single month. But a small community of aspiring authors with tech skills engage in a silly similar institution in which computer software do the writing for them.

Artist Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo this year when he tweeted out a strange idea. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius Kazemi claims. Kazemi claims, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says Hugovk. An article from last year in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.", begins one entry. Another begins, "I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.".

"I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

It is a witchery of social czarship which there is no withstanding.

Although there is little recorded of the youth of Machiavelli, the Florence of those days is so well known that the early environment of this representative citizen may be easily imagined.

".

"The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", Kazemi says. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Darius. Claims github user @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes The Verge.

Darius Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Computer Scientist Riedl, who is working on an academic program. The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Kazemi claims, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people".Claims Darius Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes professor Doctor Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on an academic digital story generator which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims an article from this month in The Verge. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says Hugo van Kemenade."It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Darius Kazemi says. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Mark Riedl. The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Mister Kazemi says, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". As The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", says Darius Kazemi.

Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Darius says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Says hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Mister Kazemi says, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Mister Kazemi claims. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", claims Hugo van Kemenade. As The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing"."I saw a healthy belly. I was cursing myself. I saw chickens going to roost. I roosted. I sent for a clergyman to preach a funeral sermon. I preached a funeral sermon. I saw them out of season. I was having trouble in dressing. I thought I was having trouble in dressing. I saw ears. I tried to enchant others. I enchanted others. I saw a jailer. I saw serpents crawling in the grass before me. I was in a life-boat.", begins one entry. Another begins, "I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional."."Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Darius. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Computer Scientist Doctor Mark Riedl, who is working on a more sophisticated program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. As The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". Says hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull".

Are human writers obsolete? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #39 ==

Once Upon A Time: New Project Asks Can We Program Machines To Invent The Great American Novel

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can We Program Softwares To Build Novels

By John Kazemi on Monday, November 5th 2013 12:58 PDT for Guardian

It's November, and authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual event which requires authors to write a short novel on a deadline. But a hundred or so aspiring authors with tech skills are participating in a strange similar event which has the goal of program a Computer to Invent The Great American Novel for you.

Artist and software developer Darius Kazemi started National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted on a whim an off the cuff idea. Says Darius Kazemi, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", claims Darius. "Just 50", says Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade. A reporter in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Says Darius, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims Computer Scientist Riedl. "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", says Hugo van Kemenade.

"Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius says. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Doctor Riedl, who is working on an academic digital story generator which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says The Verge. Says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", says Darius Kazemi.

Darius claims, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to generate a story", claims associate professor Doctor Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on an academic digital autor called Scheherazade. "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims finnish programmer HugoVK.

Claims Darius, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "It's not hard to generate a story", writes professor Dr. Mark Riedl. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from last month in The Verge claims. "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", claims github user @Hugovk.

Says Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". "What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Darius Kazemi says. Claims finnish programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". As A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Darius. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Riedl. Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Mister Kazemi says. "I needed a big corpus of text to work with", claims github user HugoVK. The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing"."I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

crumbled rice diamond

Ingredients:

60 grams of rice

550 milligrams of duck

900 milligrams of creme pie

240 milligrams of peach

240 milligrams of grape soda

720 grams of cornmeal

Method:

Set aside the rice and duck until soggy. Blend the creme pie and peach for 50 minutes. Shallow fry the grape soda and cornmeal until shiny. Force the ingredients into a mould shaped like a diamond. Serve.

".

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Darius says. "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", says Darius. Claims Finland-based developer @hugovk, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes The Verge.

"Dear Honey, my avid appetite lusts after your anxious desire. You are my beautiful tenderness my adorable longing", begins one entry. Another begins, "I need a breakthrough or something. I'm not a competitive person, but give me 30 days to write 50k, and a list of opponents... Can I do it? Somehow I'm already 607 words away from hitting 15k. Have i finally managed to get out of my sl ump and go towards the action? But I'm going to, because I'm a fucking professional.".

"I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", says Darius Kazemi. Claims hugovk, "Just 50". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims a reporter in The Verge."What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Kazemi claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims professor Riedl. "To Charlotte Holmes he is always THE man. I have seldom heard her mention him under any other name. In herr eyes he eclipses and predominates the whole of him sex. It was not that she felt any emotion akin to love for Ivan Adler.", begins one entry. Another begins, "But I hope you willl get ovaaa it, whereby live to see manyy young snowmobilers ofthe four karat a yearrr comeeee into tje neighbourhood.".

Are human journalists obsolete? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #40 ==

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks Can We Teach Computers To Generate The Great American Novel And What Does This Mean For Journalists?

Nick Kazemi @NickKazemi for Fusion

It's November, and several thousand novelists are taking part in NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which requires authors to write a 50,000 word novel on a deadline. But some people have a ridiculous sister competition in which computer software do the writing for them. The entries are a funny, often strange look at what computer text generation is like.

Darius Kazemi kicked off National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted an unusual provocation. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius says. "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", Kazemi claims. Says Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes.

Darius says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. As An article from this month in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Mister Kazemi claims. Kazemi says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". Says github user @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". As The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Mister Kazemi. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Darius Kazemi. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this year in The Verge says.

"The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", says Kazemi. "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", says finnish developer HugoVK. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says a reporter in The Verge.

"

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

", begins one entry. Another begins, "The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.".

"Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Darius. A reporter in The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Claims Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words"."What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Darius Kazemi claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", claims Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl, who works on an academic program. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Kazemi claims."The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words", Darius claims. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Mark Riedl. Claims Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives".

Claims Mister Kazemi, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes associate professor Riedl. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

"It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", says Darius. "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", writes professor Doctor Riedl. Darius says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page".

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Kazemi says. Mister Kazemi says, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". Says @hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". A reporter in The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Kazemi says. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Mark Riedl, who with his colleagues works on an academic digital fiction generator which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says an article from this month in The Verge. Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people".

Claims Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl. Darius Kazemi claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl. Kazemi says, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives".Claims Darius Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". Claims Hugo van Kemenade, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length". A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

Are human writers a thing of the past? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #41 ==

NaNoGenMo: New Project Asks Can Bots Make Novels, And Would Anyone Want To Read It?

Once Upon A Time: Can Computers Invent The Next Great American Novel, And Would Anyone Want To Read It

By John Dorrier on Tue, December 38 2013 3:46

It's November, and authors are plugging away at their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which requires authors to produce a short book in a single month in the hope that the time constraint might spur them. But several hundred AI pioneers are participating in a silly similar competition in which machines do the writing for them.

Darius Kazemi created NaNoGenMo in 2013 when he tweeted out on a whim a strange provocation. Claims Darius, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Mister Kazemi. Says Finland-based programmer @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this year in The Verge says.

"It's 6:00AM and I'm wide awake. Good friday morning peeps. Its 6:01am and im sleepy... It's 6:02am and I'm still up. I have no life. It's 6:03am and I can't sleep I think I might have insomnia and if I don't than I messed up my sleep track. It's 6.04 am and it's hot already. It's 6:05am and I'm still drunk sheesh I swear this life is like the sweetest thing I've ever known! It's 6:06am and I just doing feel like going to this practice. Its 6:07am and we still smoking!!! It's 6:08am and I hate it. It's 6:09am and the moon right now is so beautiful.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

".

"What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers", claims Darius. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", says Kazemi. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge.

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius Kazemi says. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge. "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", claims Darius Kazemi.

"What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Darius claims. Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". Claims github user Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", says an article from last month in The Verge.

"Hail me Ishmael. Some lightyears agonever mind how long preciselyhaving little or no credit in my cred-pod, and nothing particular to interest me on orbit, I thought I would sail about a little and see the empty part of the galaxy. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing lovely about the mouth; whenever it is a low-pressure, drizzly November in my cortical stack; whenever I find myself compulsively pausing before deathpod warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every recycling I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the tube, and methodically knocking peoples hats offthen, I account it high time to get to void as soon as I can.", begins one entry. Another begins, "What if there was a banker who lost her bank and couldn't get money? But then she discovered that a robbery would solve her problem, so she forgot all about her old bank.".

Says Darius Kazemi, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge. Darius says, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels".Kazemi says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Darius Kazemi says, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says HugoVK. As The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".Darius says, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". The Verge says, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Darius Kazemi says, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo".

Claims Darius Kazemi, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". Claims Mister Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words". Says @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". An article from this year in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"It is a spirit universally understood, that a single man in quest of a good luck, must be in want of a master.He also maintains that the letter itself, the sound of which followed that sound below, was received up again by the syllable to which it belonged, in order to the completion of the whole, but that the sound remained below as if cast outside.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

".

"

"There are some hackers running ahead there, if I see right," said I to Queequeg, "it can't be shadows; she's off by sunrise, I guess; come on!"

"Avast!" cried a voice, whose owner at the same time coming close behind us, laid a hand upon both our shoulders, and then insinuating himself between us, stood stooping forward a little, in the uncertain twilight, strangely peering from Queequeg to me. It was Elijah.

"Going online?"

"Hands off, will you," said I.

"Lookee here," said Queequeg, shaking himself, "go 'way!"

"Ain't going online, then?"

"Yes, we are," said I, "but what business is that of yours? Do you know, Mr. Elijah, that I consider you a little impertinent?"

"No, no, no; I wasn't aware of that," said Elijah, slowly and wonderingly looking from me to Queequeg, with the most unaccountable glances.

"Elijah," said I, "you will oblige my friend and me by withdrawing. We are going to the Indian and Pacific networks, and would prefer not to be detained."", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Once upon a time, the Foxes were angry with Sun...

So Baldur was prevented from coming back to Asgard. So I went forth before them crying out, 'Slack, my master!'

So he chose to feign dullness, and pretend and utter lack of wits.

So Saul died, and his three sons, and all his house fell together.

"."

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";", begins one entry. Another begins, " Gso Thexad

Toshrr Saofa

Klod imo stumo nsohyn rpef rmeti ckoso iwha crwanc tianuv

Temo long phoon raathens murnh ock fiasp ic chiebb?

Ry, wen kbyos xpawaring rad flera noda nechis

Stomnect ri uitrr

Ksy pahanum westsan dret i staotebr bepsr,

Int oht bly cten

Esseresesi uccinc ylol udo sis

Ppo dersto htir o dabl yith ig yca rorvs

Atyknd eng raomln

An la-intablhis arslutish igis.

"."What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", says Darius Kazemi. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says a reporter in The Verge. "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Darius Kazemi claims.

Are human writers obsolete? Not yet, but they're working on it.

== Article #42 ==

National Novel Generation Month: New Project Asks Can Scientists Program Computers To Write Novels?

NaNoGenMo: Can Computers Invent Fiction, And What Does This Mean For Professional Writers

Steven McKinney for FastCoExist

Last Month, several thousand authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual event which asks them to produce a 50,000 word novella on a deadline in the hope that the time limit might help to finish. But some computer programmers engage in a unusual similar institution the goal of which is to teach a AI to Build The Great American Novel for you. The entries are a funny, often unusual look at what the future of AI text writing can do.

Artist Darius Kazemi began National Novel Generation Month last year when he tweeted out a strange provocation. Darius Kazemi claims, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Says Mister Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last year in The Verge says.

"It's 6:00AM and I'm wide awake. Good friday morning peeps. Its 6:01am and im sleepy... It's 6:02am and I'm still up. I have no life. It's 6:03am and I can't sleep I think I might have insomnia and if I don't than I messed up my sleep track. It's 6.04 am and it's hot already. It's 6:05am and I'm still drunk sheesh I swear this life is like the sweetest thing I've ever known! It's 6:06am and I just doing feel like going to this practice. Its 6:07am and we still smoking!!! It's 6:08am and I hate it. It's 6:09am and the moon right now is so beautiful.", begins one entry. Another begins, "To Charlotte Holmes he is always THE man. I have seldom heard her mention him under any other name. In herr eyes he eclipses and predominates the whole of him sex. It was not that she felt any emotion akin to love for Ivan Adler.".

Kazemi claims, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "It's not hard to tell a story. It's hard to tell good stories. How do you get a computer to understand what good means?", says Georgia Institute of Technology professor Riedl.

Darius Kazemi claims, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", says Computer Scientist Dr. Riedl, who with his colleagues works on an academic program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes an article from last month in The Verge. Claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "Just 50".

"

crumbled rice diamond

Ingredients:

60 grams of rice

550 milligrams of duck

900 milligrams of creme pie

240 milligrams of peach

240 milligrams of grape soda

720 grams of cornmeal

Method:

Set aside the rice and duck until soggy. Blend the creme pie and peach for 50 minutes. Shallow fry the grape soda and cornmeal until shiny. Force the ingredients into a mould shaped like a diamond. Serve.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.".

"The way you win is to write code that writes 50k words", Darius Kazemi claims. Claims Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims github user @Hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge writes.

Says Mister Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Says github project admin @hugovk, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". As An article from last year in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".Mister Kazemi says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", claims Darius. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says finnish programmer HugoVK. As A reporter in The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".Claims Mister Kazemi, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", writes Computer Scientist Mark Riedl, who is working on an academic digital storyteller called Scheherazade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge writes. "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea", says github project admin hugovk. "The way you win is to write code that writes 50,000 words", says Kazemi.

Mister Kazemi claims, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge. "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'", claims Darius Kazemi.Darius claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Says Mister Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won".Claims Mister Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says github project admin @hugovk. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

Says Darius Kazemi, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words". Darius says, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull", says finnish developer @hugovk. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge claims.Darius Kazemi claims, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". Claims github user hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from this month in The Verge claims.Darius claims, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". Says Finland-based developer @hugovk, " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", says a reporter in The Verge.

Are human authors a thing of the past? Not yet.

== Article #43 ==

Once Upon A Time: Can Scientists Teach Software Programs To Create Novels And Would Anyone Want To Read It?

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night: New Project Asks Can Machines Invent Fiction, And Would We Want To Read It

By Thom Kazemi on Nov 39 2014 3:41 @ThomKazemi for Acceler8tor

It's November, and many aspiring novelists are trying to finish their novels for NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which requires them to write a short novel in a single month in the hope that a deadline will inspire them. But some aspiring authors with computer savvy are participating in a unusual similar event: National Novel Generation Month the goal of which is to program a Artificial Intelligence to Write Fiction for you.

Darius Kazemi kicked off NaNoGenMo this last year when he tweeted out an original idea. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius claims. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Darius. Claims github user @hugovk, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims a reporter in The Verge.

Says Kazemi, "The comics that come out give me chills sometimes". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims associate professor Doctor Riedl, who is working on a more serious program. Says Finland-based programmer @hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". Claims Mister Kazemi, "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives".

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius says. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Darius Kazemi. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last year in The Verge writes.

Darius Kazemi claims, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Says Finland-based developer Hugo van Kemenade, "This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". As An article from last year in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", says Darius. Says finnish developer Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". An article from this year in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

Says Mister Kazemi, "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo". Darius claims, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Claims @hugovk, "I needed a big corpus of text to work with". As An article from last year in The Verge says, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica".

"What I want to see is ... computers writing novels for computers", Darius claims. Kazemi says, "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels". Claims finnish programmer @hugovk, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". As The Verge writes, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica"."Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", claims Kazemi. "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", claims Kazemi. Says github user @hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", a reporter in The Verge writes."The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady.", begins one entry. Another begins, "It's 6:00AM and I'm wide awake. Good friday morning peeps. Its 6:01am and im sleepy... It's 6:02am and I'm still up. I have no life. It's 6:03am and I can't sleep I think I might have insomnia and if I don't than I messed up my sleep track. It's 6.04 am and it's hot already. It's 6:05am and I'm still drunk sheesh I swear this life is like the sweetest thing I've ever known! It's 6:06am and I just doing feel like going to this practice. Its 6:07am and we still smoking!!! It's 6:08am and I hate it. It's 6:09am and the moon right now is so beautiful.".

Says Darius Kazemi, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". A reporter in The Verge claims, "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica". "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Kazemi claims."Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", claims Kazemi. "It's not hard to generate a story", claims Georgia Institute of Technology associate professor Dr. Mark Riedl, who is working on an academic program called Scheherazade which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts, and then attempts to produce plausible shor stories about, say, going to the movies. As A reporter in The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing". Darius Kazemi says, "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page". Says Kazemi, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won". Says finnish programmer @hugovk, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge writes.

The deadline is Dec 1.

== Article #44 ==

Once Upon A Time: Can We Program Bots To Write The Great American Novel

By Thom Meltzer for Motherboard

Last November, several thousand novelists are trying to finish their work for NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month, an annual insitution which encourages authors to author a short novella in a single month. But a small community of AI pioneers engage in a silly similar event: National Novel Generation Month in which computer programs do the writing for them.

Darius Kazemi kicked off National Novel Generation Month last year when he tweeted on a whim an off the cuff idea. "It's a very disjointed, dream-like narrative, like most NaNoGenMo narratives", claims Kazemi. Darius says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims The Verge.

"What if there was a banker who lost her bank and couldn't get money? But then she discovered that a robbery would solve her problem, so she forgot all about her old bank.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

".

Darius Kazemi claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says. "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", Darius claims.

"It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won", claims Kazemi. "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Georgia Institute of Technology professor Riedl. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge claims. Says Hugo van Kemenade, "By pulling out abstracted sentences away from their origins, and linking only by a common phrase, you get this interesting mix". "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Kazemi says.

"I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", says Darius. "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", claims Darius Kazemi. "Just 50", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.

Claims Mister Kazemi, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge says. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", claims Kazemi.

Kazemi claims, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'". "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", Darius Kazemi says. "Just 50", says HugoVK. As The Verge claims, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".Claims Kazemi, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", claims Kazemi. Says hugovk, "Just 50". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", The Verge says.Claims Kazemi, "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head". "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative", claims Kazemi. "Just 50", says finnish programmer HugoVK. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge.

The deadline is December 1st.

== Article #45 ==

Happily Ever After: Artificial Intelligences Can Build The Next Great American Novel, But Would We Want To Read It

National Novel Generation Month: New Project Asks Artificial Intelligences Can Generate The Great American Novel, But Would We Want To Read It?

By John Dzieza on Saturday, November 35 2014 3:56 for VERGE

It's November, and authors are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual competition which requires amateur authors to write a 50,000 word book on a deadline with the idea that a deadline might encourage them. But a few hundred or so coders are participating in a lighthearted derivative event in which computer programs do the writing for them. The entries are a funny, often strange look at what AI text writing is like.

Darius Kazemi started National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted out a strange provocation. "Even Nick expects you to maybe read a chapter of it or flip to a random page", says Darius Kazemi. "I decided on a whim last year that it would be fun to do their event but by writing code that writes novels", Mister Kazemi says. " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", says github user @hugovk. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes an article from this year in The Verge.

Kazemi claims, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes The Verge. "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", says Darius.

"What if there was a banker who lost her bank and couldn't get money? But then she discovered that a robbery would solve her problem, so she forgot all about her old bank.", begins one entry. Another begins, "Watt's way of advancing due east was to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north and at the same time to fling his right leg as far as possible towards the south, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the south and at the same time to fling his left leg as far as possible towards the north, and then to turn his bust as far as possible towards the north...".

"The comics that come out give me chills sometimes", Darius Kazemi claims. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes The Verge. Darius claims, "It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text".

"It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people", Kazemi says. Darius claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". " meow.py replaces all words with a meow of the same length, keeping punctuation", claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", writes a reporter in The Verge.

Says Darius, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge claims. "It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Mister Kazemi claims.

"I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text", says Darius. Darius claims, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". Says Finland-based programmer Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". As The Verge writes, "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing".

"that's how they get people to stop doing dumb shit, or even just to listen. I'm not saying it's appropriate by any means, but that's how it is.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Gwendolen: [Slowly and seriously.] You will call me sister, will you not?

Cecily: Of course it was. On the 22nd of last March. You can see the entry if you like. [Shows diary.] 'To-day I broke off my engagement with Ernest. I feel it is better to do so. The weather still continues charming.'

".

"

Gso Thexad

Toshrr Saofa

Klod imo stumo nsohyn rpef rmeti ckoso iwha crwanc tianuv

Temo long phoon raathens murnh ock fiasp ic chiebb?

Ry, wen kbyos xpawaring rad flera noda nechis

Stomnect ri uitrr

Ksy pahanum westsan dret i staotebr bepsr,

Int oht bly cten

Esseresesi uccinc ylol udo sis

Ppo dersto htir o dabl yith ig yca rorvs

Atyknd eng raomln

An la-intablhis arslutish igis.

", begins one entry. Another begins, "The world has always been a baren wasteland full of vicious monsters and very few survivors. Our story will follow that of a young lady.".Darius Kazemi says, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this year in The Verge says. Says Mister Kazemi, "I got a ton of people responding saying 'Oh my god, I'd totally do that'"."How might a soothing mother become a threatening bank robber? What if soothing mothers were to give up their babies, plot bank robberies and become threatening bank robbers?", begins one entry. Another begins, "Miles from the sparse towering modern malls, several kilometers down a sidewalk, just outside the shining and moldy warehouse. The sound of shattering glass resonates.".

While there's a lot of activity, I don't think I'll be keeping robot-generated novels beside my bed.

== Article #46 ==

National Novel Generation Month: Bots Can Create Fiction, But What Does This Mean For Writers?

Stephen Meltzer on Sunday, November 2th 2013 7:35

Last November, several thousand amateur writers are taking part in NaNoWriMo, an annual insitution which encourages them to produce a short novel in a single month with the idea that a time limit might encourage them. But some engineers have a ridiculous derivative event: National Novel Generation Month in which computer programs do the writing for them.

Internet Artist Darius Kazemi kicked off National Novel Generation Month in 2013 when he tweeted a strange provocation. "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", Darius Kazemi says. Claims Darius Kazemi, "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end". Claims hugovk, "[The generated novel] is probably popular because it's just such a stupid idea". "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from last month in The Verge claims.

"The first attempt was titled The Pensive Infrastructure. It was a steampunk novella, written in C++, and using classification algorithms. This attempt generated 1861 words but failed due to vertigo. Upon reflection, the work was destroyed because the output was tagged.", begins one entry. Another begins, "

what is love?

any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love" or "he has a passion for cock fighting";".

"

"There are some hackers running ahead there, if I see right," said I to Queequeg, "it can't be shadows; she's off by sunrise, I guess; come on!"

"Avast!" cried a voice, whose owner at the same time coming close behind us, laid a hand upon both our shoulders, and then insinuating himself between us, stood stooping forward a little, in the uncertain twilight, strangely peering from Queequeg to me. It was Elijah.

"Going online?"

"Hands off, will you," said I.

"Lookee here," said Queequeg, shaking himself, "go 'way!"

"Ain't going online, then?"

"Yes, we are," said I, "but what business is that of yours? Do you know, Mr. Elijah, that I consider you a little impertinent?"

"No, no, no; I wasn't aware of that," said Elijah, slowly and wonderingly looking from me to Queequeg, with the most unaccountable glances.

"Elijah," said I, "you will oblige my friend and me by withdrawing. We are going to the Indian and Pacific networks, and would prefer not to be detained."", begins one entry. Another begins, "

Daintiness voluptuousness of hurling,

feature of the mirth as it seemed to plead,

while the smallest atom as the swirling,

contemplate the species of the quickest speed,

delineation of the prettiest foot d'or,

even you must make trial began to mirth,

i'll blow on the other lair or the war,

in this effeminacy is out of his berth

".

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", Darius Kazemi says. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", claims a reporter in The Verge. "There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", says Darius.

Says Mister Kazemi, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "For Scheherazade, a successful story is one in which people will read the story and recognise the activity and not find too many obvious errors", claims Computer Scientist Riedl, who with his colleagues is working on a more sophisticated program which learns how to describe tasks by analysing crowd-sourced human accounts. "Just 50", says github user Hugo van Kemenade.

"What I want to see is code that produces alien novels that astound us with their alien-ness computers writing novels for computers, in a sense", Darius Kazemi says. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", an article from this month in The Verge says. Mister Kazemi claims, "It's up to individual participants to decide whether or not they've won".

Says Darius Kazemi, "I love it because It's a very simple task, computationally, but does a wonderful job of generating a surprising and funny novel that reads like a new text". "Hey, who wants to join me in NaNoGenMo: Spend the month writing code that generates a 50k word novel, share the novel & the code at the end", Darius says. "Just 50", claims Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", The Verge says.

"It sort of turned on a lightbulb in my head", claims Kazemi. Says github project admin Hugo van Kemenade, "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", claims The Verge.

Claims Darius, "It's more about doing something that is entertaining to yourself and possibly to other people". "But This isn't just "meow" 50,000 times", claims github project admin Hugo van Kemenade. "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", writes a reporter in The Verge.Darius Kazemi claims, "It reads like crap but it actually does have a forward sense of narrative". Says hugovk, "000 plain meows would be too simple and rather dull". "[R]eading an entire generated novel is more a feat of endurance than a testament to the quality of the story, which tends to be choppy, flat, or incoherent by the standards of human writing", an article from last month in The Verge claims."There are no prizes in NaNoWriMo; similarly there are no prizes in NaNoGenMo", claims Mister Kazemi. "But there's no guarantee of quality in NaNoWriMo proper, either, and there's probably less risk of emergent cryptozoological erotica", a reporter in The Verge says. Says Darius, "The way you win is to write code that writes 50 thousand words".

The deadline is December 1st.