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Managing Your Project

jdtang edited this page Jun 6, 2012 · 1 revision

Managing Your Project

While an Enyo application may be as simple as single HTML5 file, once we start making more sophisticated apps, there will be numerous resources to manage, versions and dependencies to track, and debug switches to control. This document covers a number of conventions adopted by the Enyo team to facilitate a smooth workflow.

The Basic Scaffold

Enyo is designed so that plugins, applications, and Enyo itself are portable resources. The use of common folder conventions significantly simplifies the management of these resources.

The suggested folder structure for a plugin looks like this:

<plugin>
    assets/
    source/
    (readmes, licenses, nfos)
  • source contains JavaScript modules, stylesheets, or other raw (code) materials for the application.

  • assets typically contains images or other resources needed by both production and debug versions of the application. There can be as many of these folders as you like, and the folder name is not special--a project might have folders called images and json, for example. However, our suggestion is that you keep all such items in one folder called assets, so end users will know right away that this folder is necessary for final deployment.

  • The <plugin> folder will often contain other items, such as readmes, licenses, or other miscellaneous files.

The suggested setup for applications is similar, but includes some additions:

<application>
    assets/
    enyo/
    lib/
    build/
    source/
    tools/
    (readmes, licenses, nfos)
    index.html
  • The enyo folder contains a copy of the Enyo framework source. As discussed below, it's possible to reference enyo from a common location instead of embedding it in the application proper, but for ease of versioning and sealing, we recommend keeping a copy of Enyo with your application.

  • The lib folder contains any plugins or other resources used by the project.

  • The build folder is the home for minified resources. Minified resources have been processed (by the minify script) to remove comments, whitespace, and other features that are not critical to functionality. In JavaScript files, sometimes syntax is changed (e.g., variable names may be shortened) to reduce file size.

    When minify is run successfully, the output in build is one JavaScript file and one CSS file.

  • The tools folder houses the aforementioned minify script, along with another script called deploy.

    During development, you load material directly from the source folder. When you're ready to deploy the application, run the deploy script to create a version of the app with the code minified and non-essential files removed.

    (Note that deploy calls minify, so it generally isn't necessary to call minify directly.)

The lib Folder and Plugins

Enyo's infrastructure is intended to support a wide variety of plugins. While it is not a technical requirement, the convention is to put plugins in a folder called lib that is a peer to enyo:

<application>
    enyo/
    lib/
        aPluginFolder/
            assets/
            source/
            (readmes, licenses, nfos)

Again, notice that the standard scaffold has been used for this plugin.

Standard Snapshot

If we combine the two preceding examples, we get the complete suggested folder structure:

<application>
    assets/
    build/
        enyo-<version>.js
        enyo-<version>.css
        app.js
        app.css
    enyo/
    lib/
        aPluginFolder/
            assets/
            source/
            (readmes, licenses, nfos)
    source/
    tools/
    index.html
    (readmes, licenses, nfos)

As touched upon earlier, to construct a production version of the app, duplicate the folder tree and then run deploy to generate a deployment build with debug and development resources removed.

Here's the deployment tree for the suggested folder structure:

<application>
    assets/
    build/
        enyo-<version>.js
        enyo-<version>.css
        app.js
        app.css
    lib/
        aPluginFolder/
            assets/
            (licenses)
    index.html

Note that the enyo folder itself is not necessary for deployment.

Sharing Enyo

As mentioned previously, it's also possible to build applications that refer to shared copies of Enyo and/or plugins. In this case, shared resources are found in a common location:

<shared-root>/
    enyo/
    lib/
        aPlugin/

The following structure shows two applications, both of which load Enyo and plugins from <shared-root>:

<apps-root>
    app1/
        assets/
        source/
        index.html
    app2/
        assets/
        source/

This type of setup is most useful when developing plugins, creating a suite of applications that will be deployed together, or working on the Enyo source itself.

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