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Generate new inflected phrases
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examples
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README.md
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README.md

morphogen is a tool for improving machine translation into morphologically rich languages. It uses source context to predict inflections, and uses these inflection models to create augmented grammars that can be used with a standard decoder.

A paper describing this tool, which appeared in the Prague Bulletin of Mathematical Linguistics, can be found here. This work and fast_umorph will also be presented at EMNLP 2013.

Dependencies

Example workflows for using morphogen are provided using ducttape. If you have ducttape and morphogen installed, the ducttape workflows will install all of the external programs for you. However, this assumes that you have the dependencies for the external tools already installed on your system (e.g. Boost for cdec, OpenFST for fast_umorph, etc.). While we try to make this process as painless as possible, we cannot anticipate all problems with external tools.

While the morphogen code itself is not dependent on anything external, it is intended to be used with a number of external tools. Specifically, it is used to extend the per-sentence grammars created by cdec. The inflection model depends on having good source side information, in the form of dependency parsing, part-of-speech tagging, and word clustering. We do these using TurboParser, TurboTagger, and 600 Brown clusters produced from large amounts of monolingual English data. These are all publically available.

If no morphological segmentations are given, we use fast_umorph to get unsupervised morphological segmentations. This requires the OpenFST library to be installed and in your path. The Makefile for fast_umorph assumes g++ 4.7. There is also a known issue with compiling and OpenFST (more info here)

The tagging and parsing could theoretically be done with any tool. Morphogen only requires that the dependency parses are in the Stanford dependency format.

morphogen/structlearn contains scripts for training the model with stochastic gradient descent implemented in Cython and Python. It is strongly recommended that you install Cython, as it takes significantly longer to train the inflection models using the standard Python implementation.

Running

Unsupervised

A ducttape workflow (unsupervised.tape) is provided in the examples folder. If you replace the dev, test, and train variables in unsupervised.tape with paths to your data sets (in SRC ||| TGT bitext format), point the morphogen global variable at your clone of morphogen, specify the 8-bit encoding for your target language, and run ducttape unsupervised.tape -p basic -O unsup it will:

  • clone all of the necessary external tools to your machine
  • preprocess your data
  • produce unsupervised morphological segmentations with fast_umorph(this can take time, depending on the number of iterations)
  • use them to train an inflection model with stochastic gradient descent
  • extract per-sentence-grammars for the dev and test sets with cdec
  • augment your grammars with the inflection model
  • tune your augmented system using MIRA
  • evaluate your system on the given test set

The -p basic option says that we should run the workflow path basic. The -O option specifies the output directory for the workflow.

There is a very good, if incomplete, ducttape tutorial here

If you have any of the dependencies already installed (cdec, TurboParser), you can point the ducttape workflows to these and use them instead. There is an example in the ducttape files.

The corpus used with fast_umorph to get unsupervised segmentations must be encoded in an 8-bit format (e.g. ISO-8859-[1-16]). If you're using our unsupervised.tape, this means you need to specify the correct 8-bit encoding for your target language in the global variables. The script will do the necessary conversions for you.

The unsupervised morphological segmentations take three hyperparameters (alpha_prefix, alpha_stem, and alpha_suffix). We have found that alpha_prefix, alpha_suffix << alpha_stem << 1 is necessary to produce useful segmentations. This encodes that there should be many more possible stems than there are inflectional affixes. The number of iterations necessary to produce good segmentations varies depending on the language. In general alpha_prefix = alpha_suffix = 1e-6 , alpha_stem = 1e-4 at 1000 iterations is a good starting point.

You can edit the ducttape file to specify your own segmentations. Simply define a global variable that points to your segmentations and replace all references to the output of the umorph task with your variable. You do not need to remove the task. It will not run if it is not required to reach the end goal of the plan.

Format: token   prefix^prefix^<stem>^suffix^suffix (e.g. тренинговой   <тренинг>^ов^ой)

Supervised

We also provide a ducttape workflow for supervised models, and an example configuration file for a Russian positional tagset. If you will be training a supervised model, all of the target side preprocessing must be done by you. Format: SRC ||| TGT ||| TGT stem ||| TGT tag

struct_train.py assumes that the first letter of the tag is the word category, but this can be easily modified.

Similarly, any monolingual data must be preprocessed. Format: TGT ||| TGT stem ||| TGT tag

You MUST provide a Python configuration file which defines a function get_attributes(category, attributes), which yields a list of features given the category and morphological analysis of a word. This file must be placed in the folder morphogen/config_files/. Since this function depends on the format produced by your supervised morphological analyzer, you must define it yourself. This will be used when training the inflection model to create sparse vectors of target inflectional features. There is an example function for a Russian positional tagset in morphogen/config_files/russian_config.py.

Both

If you don't specifiy a target language model, a 4-gram language model will be created as a part of the ducttape workflow. We recommend also creating a class based target language model and using this in addition to the standard target language model. Our class based language models were created from 600 brown clusters trained on monolingual data and smoothed with Witten-Bell. All language models must be in the KenLM format for use with cdec

We also provide a ducttape script for intrinsic evaluation of inflection models. This preprocesses the given development data in the same manner as the training data and evaluates our hypothesized inflections against the actual inflections. It's more of a sanity check than anything else.

To inspect the feature weights learned by a given model, use python show_model.py model > model.features

Current Work

An implementation of Adagrad (with or without L1 regularization) has been added but is not fully tested (use at your own risk).

License

Copyright © 2013 Victor Chahuneau, Eva Schlinger

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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