Skip to content
Another functional CSS library – 1.2kb ⚡️
Branch: master
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
dist
src
.gitignore
README.md
build.js
package-lock.json
package.json
postcss.config.js

README.md

svbstrate npm

Another functional CSS library. Itsy-bitsy classes. Fast and small and all that. Use it if you want. Includes a neat little CLI to copy the files.

Features

  1. No grid
  2. No breakpoints
  3. No colors
  4. No reset/normalize*
  5. No opinions, other than what to leave out
  6. 1.2kb gzipped

This library doesn't include everything out of the box, because you probably don't need everything out of the box. Define your own grid, colors, and breakpoints, and build up from there using your preferred libraries or methods.

*Ok ok, there are two rules.

Usage

Copy the files from the repo, install to node_modules, or use the CLI. Up to you.

npm i svbstrate --save

To use the CLI, install globally.

npm i svbstrate -g

svbstrate init path/to/stylesheets/dir

# later, to update
npm i svbstrate@latest -g

# for help
svbstrate help

CDN

If you'd like, you can also use unpkg:

<link rel='stylesheet' href='https://unpkg.com/svbstrate' type='text/css'/>

Philosophies

This has been covered again and again by people smarter than me. Functional CSS is a smart way to define your stylesheets.

With that out of the way, I encourage these things:

  1. Use em units for everything
  2. Don't create spacing classes over 2em
  3. Mobile first
  4. Use utility classes as a substrate or baseline. Use custom classes for case-specific scenarios.

Styles

display

As ever, use appropriate tags for block-level or inline elements, etc. These are just a couple most commonly applied as overrides. Add more if you like.

.block { display: block }
.inline-block { display: inline-block }

positioning

Use the .fill and directional classes to quickly stick elements within their scope.

.rel { position: relative }
.abs { position: absolute }
.fix { position: fixed }
.fill, .top { top: 0 }
.fill, .bottom { bottom: 0 }
.fill, .left { left: 0 }
.fill, .right { right: 0 }
.x { width: 100% }
.y { height: 100% }

flexbox

Just about all you need to build any grid.

.f { display: flex }
.fw { flex-wrap: wrap }
.ais { align-items: flex-start }
.aie { align-items: flex-end }
.aic { align-items: center }
.aib { align-items: baseline }
.jcs { justify-content: flex-start }
.jce { justify-content: flex-end }
.jcc { justify-content: center }
.jcb { justify-content: space-between }
.fa {
  flex: 1 1 auto;
  min-width: 0;
  min-height: 0;
}

typography & scale

White-space should be defined by your type-scale via em units. The scale is therefore derived from the typographical hierarchy defined here. Also note a few useful utils.

body {
  color: #000;
  font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;
  font-size: 100%;
  line-height: 1.7;
  font-weight: 400;
  -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; 
}
.s1,
h1, .h1 {
  font-size: 4rem;
}
h1, .h1 { 
  line-height: 1.1;
}
.s2,
h2, .h2 { 
  font-size: 3rem;
}
h2, .h2 { 
  line-height: 1.3;
}
.s3,
h3, .h3 { 
  font-size: 2rem;
}
h3, .h3 { 
  line-height: 1.5;
}
.s4,
h4, .h4 { 
  font-size: 1.5rem;
}
h4, .h4 { 
  line-height: 1.5;
}
.s5,
h5, .h5 { 
  font-size: 1rem;
}
h5, .h5 { 
  line-height: 1.6;
}
.s6,
h6, .h6 { 
  font-size: 0.875rem;
}
h6, .h6 { 
  line-height: 1.6;
}
.s0,
p, .p { 
  font-size: 1rem;
}
p, .p { 
  line-height: 1.7;
}
p { 
  margin: 1em 0
}
a {
  color: inherit
}
hr {
  display: block;
  border: 0;
  margin: 0;
  height: 1px;
  width: 100%;
  background-color: currentColor;
  color: inherit;
}
small, .small {
  font-size: 0.75em;
}
strong, .b {
  font-weight: bold;
}
em, .i {
  font-style: italic;
}
.caps {
  text-transform: uppercase;
}
.no-under {
  text-decoration: none;
}

spacing

Whitespace is important, but bike-shedding isn't worth it. Define relational spacing using small increments, and use custom classes and media queries to expand from there.

These all work the same way:

m    margin
ml    margin left
mr    margin right
my    margin y-axis
mx    margin x-axis

p    padding
pl    padding left
pr    padding right
py    padding y-axis
px    padding x-axis

The directional prefix is followed by a value. Preconfigured values: 0.25em 0.5em 0.75em 1em. I don't reccommend going beyond 1em as your largest increment. Past that, I find there are many caveats and responsive changes that make larger increments unnecessary.

.mxa, .ma { margin-left: auto }
.mxa, .ma { margin-right: auto }
.mya, .ma { margin-top: auto }
.mya, .ma { margin-bottom: auto; }

.mt0, .my0, .m0 { margin-top: 0 }
.mb0, .my0, .m0 { margin-bottom: 0 }

.mt025, .my025, .m025 { margin-top: 0.25em }
.mb025, .my025, .m025 { margin-bottom: 0.25em }
.ml025, .mx025, .m025 { margin-left: 0.25em }
.mr025, .mx025, .m025 { margin-right: 0.25em }
.pt025, .py025, .p025 { padding-top: 0.25em }
.pb025, .py025, .p025 { padding-bottom: 0.25em }
.pl025, .px025, .p025 { padding-left: 0.25em }
.pr025, .px025, .p025 { padding-right: 0.25em }

.mt05, .my05, .m05 { margin-top: 0.5em }
.mb05, .my05, .m05 { margin-bottom: 0.5em }
.ml05, .mx05, .m05 { margin-left: 0.5em }
.mr05, .mx05, .m05 { margin-right: 0.5em }
.pt05, .py05, .p05 { padding-top: 0.5em }
.pb05, .py05, .p05 { padding-bottom: 0.5em }
.pl05, .px05, .p05 { padding-left: 0.5em }
.pr05, .px05, .p05 { padding-right: 0.5em }

.mt075, .my075, .m075 { margin-top: 0.75em }
.mb075, .my075, .m075 { margin-bottom: 0.75em }
.ml075, .mx075, .m075 { margin-left: 0.75em }
.mr075, .mx075, .m075 { margin-right: 0.75em }
.pt075, .py075, .p075 { padding-top: 0.75em }
.pb075, .py075, .p075 { padding-bottom: 0.75em }
.pl075, .px075, .p075 { padding-left: 0.75em }
.pr075, .px075, .p075 { padding-right: 0.75em }

.mt1, .my1, .m1 { margin-top: 1em }
.mb1, .my1, .m1 { margin-bottom: 1em }
.ml1, .mx1, .m1 { margin-left: 1em }
.mr1, .mx1, .m1 { margin-right: 1em }
.pt1, .py1, .p1 { padding-top: 1em }
.pb1, .py1, .p1 { padding-bottom: 1em }
.pl1, .px1, .p1 { padding-left: 1em }
.pr1, .px1, .p1 { padding-right: 1em }

alignment

.al { text-align: left }
.ac { text-align: center }
.ar { text-align: right }
.aj { text-align: justify }

buttons

Baseline to style your own buttons.

button {
  border: 0;
  border-radius: 0;
  display: inline-block;
  cursor: pointer;
  -webkit-appearance: none;
}
button.button,
.button[role="button"],
input.button[type="submit"] {
  background-color: #000;
  color: white;
  padding: 0.5em 1.5em;
}

forms

Baseline to style your own forms.

form {
  margin: 0;
}
input,
textarea,
select {
  display: inline-block;
  outline: 0;
  border-radius: 0;
  border: 1px solid #000;
  position: relative;
  font-size: inherit;
  background-color: transparent;
}
textarea {
  max-width: 100%;
  overflow: auto;
  resize: vertical;
}

lists

In order to encourage semantic HTML, list styles are disabled by default.

ol, ul {
  list-style: none;
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
}
ul.list,
ol.list {
  padding-left: 2em;
}
ol.list {
  list-style: decimal;
}
ul.list {
  list-style: disc;
}

z-index

Manage stacking order without defining one-off classes.

.z0 { z-index: 0 }
.z1 { z-index: 100 }
.z2 { z-index: 200 }
.z3 { z-index: 300 }
.z5 { z-index: 500 }
.z6 { z-index: 600 }
.z7 { z-index: 700 }
.z8 { z-index: 800 }
.z9 { z-index: 900 }
.z10 { z-index: 1000 }

Prior Art

These guys (and others, but a lot is due to these two) brought functional CSS into everyday conversation. Inspired by them, I started this repo (my very first!) in September 2014 and continue to iterate and learn from it when I can. Yay CSS.

MIT License

You can’t perform that action at this time.