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module EventMachine
class FileNotFoundException < Exception
end
# EventMachine::Connection is a class that is instantiated
# by EventMachine's processing loop whenever a new connection
# is created. (New connections can be either initiated locally
# to a remote server or accepted locally from a remote client.)
# When a Connection object is instantiated, it <i>mixes in</i>
# the functionality contained in the user-defined module
# specified in calls to {EventMachine.connect} or {EventMachine.start_server}.
# User-defined handler modules may redefine any or all of the standard
# methods defined here, as well as add arbitrary additional code
# that will also be mixed in.
#
# EventMachine manages one object inherited from EventMachine::Connection
# (and containing the mixed-in user code) for every network connection
# that is active at any given time.
# The event loop will automatically call methods on EventMachine::Connection
# objects whenever specific events occur on the corresponding connections,
# as described below.
#
# This class is never instantiated by user code, and does not publish an
# initialize method. The instance methods of EventMachine::Connection
# which may be called by the event loop are:
#
# * {#post_init}
# * {#connection_completed}
# * {#receive_data}
# * {#unbind}
# * {#ssl_verify_peer} (if TLS is used)
# * {#ssl_handshake_completed}
#
# All of the other instance methods defined here are called only by user code.
#
# @see file:docs/GettingStarted.md EventMachine tutorial
class Connection
# @private
attr_accessor :signature
# @private
alias original_method method
# Override .new so subclasses don't have to call super and can ignore
# connection-specific arguments
#
# @private
def self.new(sig, *args)
allocate.instance_eval do
# Store signature
@signature = sig
# associate_callback_target sig
# Call a superclass's #initialize if it has one
initialize(*args)
# post initialize callback
post_init
self
end
end
# Stubbed initialize so legacy superclasses can safely call super
#
# @private
def initialize(*args)
end
# Called by the event loop immediately after the network connection has been established,
# and before resumption of the network loop.
# This method is generally not called by user code, but is called automatically
# by the event loop. The base-class implementation is a no-op.
# This is a very good place to initialize instance variables that will
# be used throughout the lifetime of the network connection.
#
# @see #connection_completed
# @see #unbind
# @see #send_data
# @see #receive_data
def post_init
end
# Called by the event loop whenever data has been received by the network connection.
# It is never called by user code. {#receive_data} is called with a single parameter, a String containing
# the network protocol data, which may of course be binary. You will
# generally redefine this method to perform your own processing of the incoming data.
#
# Here's a key point which is essential to understanding the event-driven
# programming model: <i>EventMachine knows absolutely nothing about the protocol
# which your code implements.</i> You must not make any assumptions about
# the size of the incoming data packets, or about their alignment on any
# particular intra-message or PDU boundaries (such as line breaks).
# receive_data can and will send you arbitrary chunks of data, with the
# only guarantee being that the data is presented to your code in the order
# it was collected from the network. Don't even assume that the chunks of
# data will correspond to network packets, as EventMachine can and will coalesce
# several incoming packets into one, to improve performance. The implication for your
# code is that you generally will need to implement some kind of a state machine
# in your redefined implementation of receive_data. For a better understanding
# of this, read through the examples of specific protocol handlers in EventMachine::Protocols
#
# The base-class implementation (which will be invoked only if you didn't override it in your protocol handler)
# simply prints incoming data packet size to stdout.
#
# @param [String] data Opaque incoming data.
# @note Depending on the protocol, buffer sizes and OS networking stack configuration, incoming data may or may not be "a complete message".
# It is up to this handler to detect content boundaries to determine whether all the content (for example, full HTTP request)
# has been received and can be processed.
#
# @see #post_init
# @see #connection_completed
# @see #unbind
# @see #send_data
# @see file:docs/GettingStarted.md EventMachine tutorial
def receive_data data
puts "............>>>#{data.length}"
end
# Called by EventMachine when the SSL/TLS handshake has
# been completed, as a result of calling #start_tls to initiate SSL/TLS on the connection.
#
# This callback exists because {#post_init} and {#connection_completed} are **not** reliable
# for indicating when an SSL/TLS connection is ready to have its certificate queried for.
#
# @see #get_peer_cert
def ssl_handshake_completed
end
# Called by EventMachine when :verify_peer => true has been passed to {#start_tls}.
# It will be called with each certificate in the certificate chain provided by the remote peer.
#
# The cert will be passed as a String in PEM format, the same as in {#get_peer_cert}. It is up to user defined
# code to perform a check on the certificates. The return value from this callback is used to accept or deny the peer.
# A return value that is not nil or false triggers acceptance. If the peer is not accepted, the connection
# will be subsequently closed.
#
# @example This server always accepts all peers
#
# module AcceptServer
# def post_init
# start_tls(:verify_peer => true)
# end
#
# def ssl_verify_peer(cert)
# true
# end
#
# def ssl_handshake_completed
# $server_handshake_completed = true
# end
# end
#
#
# @example This server never accepts any peers
#
# module DenyServer
# def post_init
# start_tls(:verify_peer => true)
# end
#
# def ssl_verify_peer(cert)
# # Do not accept the peer. This should now cause the connection to shut down
# # without the SSL handshake being completed.
# false
# end
#
# def ssl_handshake_completed
# $server_handshake_completed = true
# end
# end
#
# @see #start_tls
def ssl_verify_peer(cert)
end
# called by the framework whenever a connection (either a server or client connection) is closed.
# The close can occur because your code intentionally closes it (using {#close_connection} and {#close_connection_after_writing}),
# because the remote peer closed the connection, or because of a network error.
# You may not assume that the network connection is still open and able to send or
# receive data when the callback to unbind is made. This is intended only to give
# you a chance to clean up associations your code may have made to the connection
# object while it was open.
#
# If you want to detect which peer has closed the connection, you can override {#close_connection} in your protocol handler
# and set an @ivar.
#
# @example Overriding Connection#close_connection to distinguish connections closed on our side
#
# class MyProtocolHandler < EventMachine::Connection
#
# # ...
#
# def close_connection(*args)
# @intentionally_closed_connection = true
# super(*args)
# end
#
# def unbind
# if @intentionally_closed_connection
# # ...
# end
# end
#
# # ...
#
# end
#
# @see #post_init
# @see #connection_completed
# @see file:docs/GettingStarted.md EventMachine tutorial
def unbind
end
# Called by the reactor after attempting to relay incoming data to a descriptor (set as a proxy target descriptor with
# {EventMachine.enable_proxy}) that has already been closed.
#
# @see EventMachine.enable_proxy
def proxy_target_unbound
end
# called when the reactor finished proxying all
# of the requested bytes.
def proxy_completed
end
# EventMachine::Connection#proxy_incoming_to is called only by user code. It sets up
# a low-level proxy relay for all data inbound for this connection, to the connection given
# as the argument. This is essentially just a helper method for enable_proxy.
#
# @see EventMachine.enable_proxy
def proxy_incoming_to(conn,bufsize=0)
EventMachine::enable_proxy(self, conn, bufsize)
end
# A helper method for {EventMachine.disable_proxy}
def stop_proxying
EventMachine::disable_proxy(self)
end
# The number of bytes proxied to another connection. Reset to zero when
# EventMachine::Connection#proxy_incoming_to is called, and incremented whenever data is proxied.
def get_proxied_bytes
EventMachine::get_proxied_bytes(@signature)
end
# EventMachine::Connection#close_connection is called only by user code, and never
# by the event loop. You may call this method against a connection object in any
# callback handler, whether or not the callback was made against the connection
# you want to close. close_connection <i>schedules</i> the connection to be closed
# at the next available opportunity within the event loop. You may not assume that
# the connection is closed when close_connection returns. In particular, the framework
# will callback the unbind method for the particular connection at a point shortly
# after you call close_connection. You may assume that the unbind callback will
# take place sometime after your call to close_connection completes. In other words,
# the unbind callback will not re-enter your code "inside" of your call to close_connection.
# However, it's not guaranteed that a future version of EventMachine will not change
# this behavior.
#
# {#close_connection} will *silently discard* any outbound data which you have
# sent to the connection using {EventMachine::Connection#send_data} but which has not
# yet been sent across the network. If you want to avoid this behavior, use
# {EventMachine::Connection#close_connection_after_writing}.
#
def close_connection after_writing = false
EventMachine::close_connection @signature, after_writing
end
# Removes given connection from the event loop.
# The connection's socket remains open and its file descriptor number is returned.
def detach
EventMachine::detach_fd @signature
end
def get_sock_opt level, option
EventMachine::get_sock_opt @signature, level, option
end
def set_sock_opt level, optname, optval
EventMachine::set_sock_opt @signature, level, optname, optval
end
# A variant of {#close_connection}.
# All of the descriptive comments given for close_connection also apply to
# close_connection_after_writing, *with one exception*: if the connection has
# outbound data sent using send_dat but which has not yet been sent across the network,
# close_connection_after_writing will schedule the connection to be closed *after*
# all of the outbound data has been safely written to the remote peer.
#
# Depending on the amount of outgoing data and the speed of the network,
# considerable time may elapse between your call to close_connection_after_writing
# and the actual closing of the socket (at which time the unbind callback will be called
# by the event loop). During this time, you *may not* call send_data to transmit
# additional data (that is, the connection is closed for further writes). In very
# rare cases, you may experience a receive_data callback after your call to {#close_connection_after_writing},
# depending on whether incoming data was in the process of being received on the connection
# at the moment when you called {#close_connection_after_writing}. Your protocol handler must
# be prepared to properly deal with such data (probably by ignoring it).
#
# @see #close_connection
# @see #send_data
def close_connection_after_writing
close_connection true
end
# Call this method to send data to the remote end of the network connection. It takes a single String argument,
# which may contain binary data. Data is buffered to be sent at the end of this event loop tick (cycle).
#
# When used in a method that is event handler (for example, {#post_init} or {#connection_completed}, it will send
# data to the other end of the connection that generated the event.
# You can also call {#send_data} to write to other connections. For more information see The Chat Server Example in the
# {file:docs/GettingStarted.md EventMachine tutorial}.
#
# If you want to send some data and then immediately close the connection, make sure to use {#close_connection_after_writing}
# instead of {#close_connection}.
#
#
# @param [String] data Data to send asynchronously
#
# @see file:docs/GettingStarted.md EventMachine tutorial
# @see Connection#receive_data
# @see Connection#post_init
# @see Connection#unbind
def send_data data
data = data.to_s
size = data.bytesize if data.respond_to?(:bytesize)
size ||= data.size
EventMachine::send_data @signature, data, size
end
# Returns true if the connection is in an error state, false otherwise.
#
# In general, you can detect the occurrence of communication errors or unexpected
# disconnection by the remote peer by handing the {#unbind} method. In some cases, however,
# it's useful to check the status of the connection using {#error?} before attempting to send data.
# This function is synchronous but it will return immediately without blocking.
#
# @return [Boolean] true if the connection is in an error state, false otherwise
def error?
errno = EventMachine::report_connection_error_status(@signature)
case errno
when 0
false
when -1
true
else
EventMachine::ERRNOS[errno]
end
end
# Called by the event loop when a remote TCP connection attempt completes successfully.
# You can expect to get this notification after calls to {EventMachine.connect}. Remember that EventMachine makes remote connections
# asynchronously, just as with any other kind of network event. This method
# is intended primarily to assist with network diagnostics. For normal protocol
# handling, use #post_init to perform initial work on a new connection (such as sending initial set of data).
# {Connection#post_init} will always be called. This method will only be called in case of a successful completion.
# A connection attempt which fails will result a call to {Connection#unbind} after the failure.
#
# @see Connection#post_init
# @see Connection#unbind
# @see file:docs/GettingStarted.md EventMachine tutorial
def connection_completed
end
# Call {#start_tls} at any point to initiate TLS encryption on connected streams.
# The method is smart enough to know whether it should perform a server-side
# or a client-side handshake. An appropriate place to call {#start_tls} is in
# your redefined {#post_init} method, or in the {#connection_completed} handler for
# an outbound connection.
#
#
# @option args [String] :cert_chain_file (nil) local path of a readable file that contants a chain of X509 certificates in
# the [PEM format](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privacy_Enhanced_Mail),
# with the most-resolved certificate at the top of the file, successive intermediate
# certs in the middle, and the root (or CA) cert at the bottom.
#
# @option args [String] :private_key_file (nil) local path of a readable file that must contain a private key in the [PEM format](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privacy_Enhanced_Mail).
#
# @option args [String] :verify_peer (false) indicates whether a server should request a certificate from a peer, to be verified by user code.
# If true, the {#ssl_verify_peer} callback on the {EventMachine::Connection} object is called with each certificate
# in the certificate chain provided by the peer. See documentation on {#ssl_verify_peer} for how to use this.
#
# @example Using TLS with EventMachine
#
# require 'rubygems'
# require 'eventmachine'
#
# module Handler
# def post_init
# start_tls(:private_key_file => '/tmp/server.key', :cert_chain_file => '/tmp/server.crt', :verify_peer => false)
# end
# end
#
# EventMachine.run do
# EventMachine.start_server("127.0.0.1", 9999, Handler)
# end
#
# @param [Hash] args
#
# @todo support passing an encryption parameter, which can be string or Proc, to get a passphrase
# for encrypted private keys.
# @todo support passing key material via raw strings or Procs that return strings instead of
# just filenames.
#
# @see #ssl_verify_peer
def start_tls args={}
priv_key, cert_chain, verify_peer = args.values_at(:private_key_file, :cert_chain_file, :verify_peer)
[priv_key, cert_chain].each do |file|
next if file.nil? or file.empty?
raise FileNotFoundException,
"Could not find #{file} for start_tls" unless File.exist? file
end
EventMachine::set_tls_parms(@signature, priv_key || '', cert_chain || '', verify_peer)
EventMachine::start_tls @signature
end
# If [TLS](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport_Layer_Security) is active on the connection, returns the remote [X509 certificate](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X.509)
# as a string, in the popular [PEM format](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privacy_Enhanced_Mail). This can then be used for arbitrary validation
# of a peer's certificate in your code.
#
# This should be called in/after the {#ssl_handshake_completed} callback, which indicates
# that SSL/TLS is active. Using this callback is important, because the certificate may not
# be available until the time it is executed. Using #post_init or #connection_completed is
# not adequate, because the SSL handshake may still be taking place.
#
# This method will return `nil` if:
#
# * EventMachine is not built with [OpenSSL](http://www.openssl.org) support
# * [TLS](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport_Layer_Security) is not active on the connection
# * TLS handshake is not yet complete
# * Remote peer for any other reason has not presented a certificate
#
#
# @example Getting peer TLS certificate information in EventMachine
#
# module Handler
# def post_init
# puts "Starting TLS"
# start_tls
# end
#
# def ssl_handshake_completed
# puts get_peer_cert
# close_connection
# end
#
# def unbind
# EventMachine::stop_event_loop
# end
# end
#
# EventMachine.run do
# EventMachine.connect "mail.google.com", 443, Handler
# end
#
# # Will output:
# # -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
# # MIIDIjCCAougAwIBAgIQbldpChBPqv+BdPg4iwgN8TANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQUFADBM
# # MQswCQYDVQQGEwJaQTElMCMGA1UEChMcVGhhd3RlIENvbnN1bHRpbmcgKFB0eSkg
# # THRkLjEWMBQGA1UEAxMNVGhhd3RlIFNHQyBDQTAeFw0wODA1MDIxNjMyNTRaFw0w
# # OTA1MDIxNjMyNTRaMGkxCzAJBgNVBAYTAlVTMRMwEQYDVQQIEwpDYWxpZm9ybmlh
# # MRYwFAYDVQQHEw1Nb3VudGFpbiBWaWV3MRMwEQYDVQQKEwpHb29nbGUgSW5jMRgw
# # FgYDVQQDEw9tYWlsLmdvb2dsZS5jb20wgZ8wDQYJKoZIhvcNAQEBBQADgY0AMIGJ
# # AoGBALlkxdh2QXegdElukCSOV2+8PKiONIS+8Tu9K7MQsYpqtLNC860zwOPQ2NLI
# # 3Zp4jwuXVTrtzGuiqf5Jioh35Ig3CqDXtLyZoypjZUQcq4mlLzHlhIQ4EhSjDmA7
# # Ffw9y3ckSOQgdBQWNLbquHh9AbEUjmhkrYxIqKXeCnRKhv6nAgMBAAGjgecwgeQw
# # KAYDVR0lBCEwHwYIKwYBBQUHAwEGCCsGAQUFBwMCBglghkgBhvhCBAEwNgYDVR0f
# # BC8wLTAroCmgJ4YlaHR0cDovL2NybC50aGF3dGUuY29tL1RoYXd0ZVNHQ0NBLmNy
# # bDByBggrBgEFBQcBAQRmMGQwIgYIKwYBBQUHMAGGFmh0dHA6Ly9vY3NwLnRoYXd0
# # ZS5jb20wPgYIKwYBBQUHMAKGMmh0dHA6Ly93d3cudGhhd3RlLmNvbS9yZXBvc2l0
# # b3J5L1RoYXd0ZV9TR0NfQ0EuY3J0MAwGA1UdEwEB/wQCMAAwDQYJKoZIhvcNAQEF
# # BQADgYEAsRwpLg1dgCR1gYDK185MFGukXMeQFUvhGqF8eT/CjpdvezyKVuz84gSu
# # 6ccMXgcPQZGQN/F4Xug+Q01eccJjRSVfdvR5qwpqCj+6BFl5oiKDBsveSkrmL5dz
# # s2bn7TdTSYKcLeBkjXxDLHGBqLJ6TNCJ3c4/cbbG5JhGvoema94=
# # -----END CERTIFICATE-----
#
# You can do whatever you want with the certificate String, such as load it
# as a certificate object using the OpenSSL library, and check its fields.
#
# @return [String] the remote [X509 certificate](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X.509), in the popular [PEM format](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privacy_Enhanced_Mail),
# if TLS is active on the connection
#
# @see Connection#start_tls
# @see Connection#ssl_handshake_completed
def get_peer_cert
EventMachine::get_peer_cert @signature
end
# Sends UDP messages.
#
# This method may be called from any Connection object that refers
# to an open datagram socket (see EventMachine#open_datagram_socket).
# The method sends a UDP (datagram) packet containing the data you specify,
# to a remote peer specified by the IP address and port that you give
# as parameters to the method.
# Observe that you may send a zero-length packet (empty string).
# However, you may not send an arbitrarily-large data packet because
# your operating system will enforce a platform-specific limit on
# the size of the outbound packet. (Your kernel
# will respond in a platform-specific way if you send an overlarge
# packet: some will send a truncated packet, some will complain, and
# some will silently drop your request).
# On LANs, it's usually OK to send datagrams up to about 4000 bytes in length,
# but to be really safe, send messages smaller than the Ethernet-packet
# size (typically about 1400 bytes). Some very restrictive WANs
# will either drop or truncate packets larger than about 500 bytes.
#
# @param [String] data Data to send asynchronously
# @param [String] recipient_address IP address of the recipient
# @param [String] recipient_port Port of the recipient
def send_datagram data, recipient_address, recipient_port
data = data.to_s
size = data.bytesize if data.respond_to?(:bytesize)
size ||= data.size
EventMachine::send_datagram @signature, data, size, recipient_address, Integer(recipient_port)
end
# This method is used with stream-connections to obtain the identity
# of the remotely-connected peer. If a peername is available, this method
# returns a sockaddr structure. The method returns nil if no peername is available.
# You can use Socket.unpack_sockaddr_in and its variants to obtain the
# values contained in the peername structure returned from #get_peername.
#
# @example How to get peer IP address and port with EventMachine
#
# require 'socket'
#
# module Handler
# def receive_data data
# port, ip = Socket.unpack_sockaddr_in(get_peername)
# puts "got #{data.inspect} from #{ip}:#{port}"
# end
# end
def get_peername
EventMachine::get_peername @signature
end
# Used with stream-connections to obtain the identity
# of the local side of the connection. If a local name is available, this method
# returns a sockaddr structure. The method returns nil if no local name is available.
# You can use {Socket.unpack_sockaddr_in} and its variants to obtain the
# values contained in the local-name structure returned from this method.
#
# @example
#
# require 'socket'
#
# module Handler
# def receive_data data
# port, ip = Socket.unpack_sockaddr_in(get_sockname)
# puts "got #{data.inspect}"
# end
# end
def get_sockname
EventMachine::get_sockname @signature
end
# Returns the PID (kernel process identifier) of a subprocess
# associated with this Connection object. For use with {EventMachine.popen}
# and similar methods. Returns nil when there is no meaningful subprocess.
#
# @return [Integer]
def get_pid
EventMachine::get_subprocess_pid @signature
end
# Returns a subprocess exit status. Only useful for {EventMachine.popen}. Call it in your
# {#unbind} handler.
#
# @return [Integer]
def get_status
EventMachine::get_subprocess_status @signature
end
# The number of seconds since the last send/receive activity on this connection.
def get_idle_time
EventMachine::get_idle_time @signature
end
# comm_inactivity_timeout returns the current value (float in seconds) of the inactivity-timeout
# property of network-connection and datagram-socket objects. A nonzero value
# indicates that the connection or socket will automatically be closed if no read or write
# activity takes place for at least that number of seconds.
# A zero value (the default) specifies that no automatic timeout will take place.
def comm_inactivity_timeout
EventMachine::get_comm_inactivity_timeout @signature
end
# Allows you to set the inactivity-timeout property for
# a network connection or datagram socket. Specify a non-negative float value in seconds.
# If the value is greater than zero, the connection or socket will automatically be closed
# if no read or write activity takes place for at least that number of seconds.
# Specify a value of zero to indicate that no automatic timeout should take place.
# Zero is the default value.
def comm_inactivity_timeout= value
EventMachine::set_comm_inactivity_timeout @signature, value.to_f
end
alias set_comm_inactivity_timeout comm_inactivity_timeout=
# The duration after which a TCP connection in the connecting state will fail.
# It is important to distinguish this value from {EventMachine::Connection#comm_inactivity_timeout},
# which looks at how long since data was passed on an already established connection.
# The value is a float in seconds.
#
# @return [Float] The duration after which a TCP connection in the connecting state will fail, in seconds.
def pending_connect_timeout
EventMachine::get_pending_connect_timeout @signature
end
# Sets the duration after which a TCP connection in a
# connecting state will fail.
#
# @param [Float, #to_f] value Connection timeout in seconds
def pending_connect_timeout= value
EventMachine::set_pending_connect_timeout @signature, value.to_f
end
alias set_pending_connect_timeout pending_connect_timeout=
# Reconnect to a given host/port with the current instance
#
# @param [String] server Hostname or IP address
# @param [Integer] port Port to reconnect to
def reconnect server, port
EventMachine::reconnect server, port, self
end
# Like {EventMachine::Connection#send_data}, this sends data to the remote end of
# the network connection. {EventMachine::Connection#send_file_data} takes a
# filename as an argument, though, and sends the contents of the file, in one
# chunk.
#
# @param [String] filename Local path of the file to send
#
# @see #send_data
# @author Kirk Haines
def send_file_data filename
EventMachine::send_file_data @signature, filename
end
# Open a file on the filesystem and send it to the remote peer. This returns an
# object of type {EventMachine::Deferrable}. The object's callbacks will be executed
# on the reactor main thread when the file has been completely scheduled for
# transmission to the remote peer. Its errbacks will be called in case of an error (such as file-not-found).
# This method employs various strategies to achieve the fastest possible performance,
# balanced against minimum consumption of memory.
#
# Warning: this feature has an implicit dependency on an outboard extension,
# evma_fastfilereader. You must install this extension in order to use {#stream_file_data}
# with files larger than a certain size (currently 8192 bytes).
#
# @option args [Boolean] :http_chunks (false) If true, this method will stream the file data in a format
# compatible with the HTTP chunked-transfer encoding
#
# @param [String] filename Local path of the file to stream
# @param [Hash] args Options
#
# @return [EventMachine::Deferrable]
def stream_file_data filename, args={}
EventMachine::FileStreamer.new( self, filename, args )
end
# Watches connection for readability. Only possible if the connection was created
# using {EventMachine.attach} and had {EventMachine.notify_readable}/{EventMachine.notify_writable} defined on the handler.
#
# @see #notify_readable?
def notify_readable= mode
EventMachine::set_notify_readable @signature, mode
end
# @return [Boolean] true if the connection is being watched for readability.
def notify_readable?
EventMachine::is_notify_readable @signature
end
# Watches connection for writeability. Only possible if the connection was created
# using {EventMachine.attach} and had {EventMachine.notify_readable}/{EventMachine.notify_writable} defined on the handler.
#
# @see #notify_writable?
def notify_writable= mode
EventMachine::set_notify_writable @signature, mode
end
# Returns true if the connection is being watched for writability.
def notify_writable?
EventMachine::is_notify_writable @signature
end
# Pause a connection so that {#send_data} and {#receive_data} events are not fired until {#resume} is called.
# @see #resume
def pause
EventMachine::pause_connection @signature
end
# Resume a connection's {#send_data} and {#receive_data} events.
# @see #pause
def resume
EventMachine::resume_connection @signature
end
# @return [Boolean] true if the connect was paused using {EventMachine::Connection#pause}.
# @see #pause
# @see #resume
def paused?
EventMachine::connection_paused? @signature
end
end
end
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