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Tree-sitter parser for the Lux programming language
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README.md

tree-sitter-lux

Build Status semantic-release NPM Version MIT

tree-sitter-lux is a Tree-sitter grammar for the Lux language. It is based on this syntax document.

installation

npm install tree-sitter tree-sitter-lux

usage

A basic nodejs script might look like this:

const Parser = require('tree-sitter');
const Lux = require('tree-sitter-lux');

const parser = new Parser();
parser.setLanguage(Lux);

const sourceCode = '(+ 1 1)';
const tree = parser.parse(sourceCode);

console.log(tree.rootNode.toString());

This produces the following syntax tree

(lux
  (form
    (identifier)
    (natural)
    (natural)))

current features

Currently the grammar recognizes all the basic Lux literals comment, bit, natural, integer, revolution, fraction, text, identifier, tag, form, tuple and record.

planned features

Recognizing definitions, anonymous functions and modules

api

The node types in the abstract syntax tree generated by tree-sitter correspond to Lux syntax tokens. Additional meaning that is derived from those syntax tokens, e.g. that(def: x Int +1) is a definition, might be encoded using fields on the node.

The top level node type is always lux. Children of the lux node are of one of the following types:

comment

Recognizes comments, e.g. ## this is a comment.

bit

Recognizes bits, e.g. #0 and #1.

natural

Recognizes naturals, e.g. 123.

integer

Recognizes integers, e.g. +123 and -456.

revolution

Recognizes revolutions, e.g. .123.

fraction

Recognizes fractions, e.g. +123.456.

text

Recognizes text, e.g. "text".

identifier

Recognizes identifiers, e.g. identifier, prefix.identifier, or ..identifier.

tag

Recognizes tags, e.g. #tag.

form

Recognizes forms, e.g. (+ 1 2). This example produces the following syntax tree:

(lux
  (form
    (identifier)
    (natural)
    (natural)))

Children of form nodes can be of any of the top level types.

tuple

Recognizes tuples, e.g. [a +2 "c"]. This example produces the following syntax tree:

(lux
  (tuple
    (identifier)
    (integer)
    (text)))

Children of form nodes can be of any of the top level types.

record

Recognizes records, e.g. {#a b "c" 4}. This example produces the following syntax tree:

(lux
  (record
    (pair key: (tag) value: (identifier))
    (pair key: (text) value: (natural))))

Children of record nodes can be of type comment or pair.

pair

Recognizes pairs of syntax tokens, but only inside records, e.g. #a b inside {#a b}. This example produces the following syntax tree:

(lux (record (pair key: (tag) value: (identifier))))

Notice the fields for key and value inside pair node. Children of pair nodes can be of any of the top level types.

Don't assume that there are exactly two children inside a pair. There might be a comment between the key and value. However, you can assume that there are always exactly two non-comment nodes inside a pair. Otherwise there would be an error.

ERROR or MISSING

Anything that is not recognized as valid Lux syntax will be encoded by a node of type ERROR or MISSING.

changelog

All notable changes to this project will be documented in this changelog. The format is based on Keep a Changelog, and this project adheres to Semantic Versioning.

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