ELS 2017 demonstration: Delivering Common Lisp Applications with ASDF 3.3
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README.md

Delivering Common Lisp Applications with ASDF 3.3

This is a proposal for a demonstration at ELS 2017.

Viewing the article

You can find a PDF version of the article (2 pages) at:

Presentation

The article was presented at ELS 2017 (video).

The source for the slides, including some comments, are in els2017-slides.ss, and a corresponding PDF is at:

Notes

The article can be compiled using PLT Racket's Scribble, from asdf2017.scrbl, using an experimental acmart package that predates the official scribble/acmart package now included in the Racket distribution. See the various Makefile targets.

To install the acmart package, do:

git clone https://github.com/fare/acmart.git
(cd acmart ; raco pkg install)

Reviews

The paper (at commit 9b197f4c) was accepted at ELS 2017 with the following reviews.

REVIEW 1

PAPER: 3
TITLE: Demonstration: Delivering Common Lisp Applications with ASDF 3.3
AUTHORS: Robert Goldman, Elias Pipping and Francois-Rene Rideau
Overall evaluation: 2 (accept)

The paper is a very nice summary of the evolution of ASDF from its inception to its current form and place within the Common Lisp ecosystem. The description of newer functionalities in ASDF is obviously only hinted given the submission constraints, but it is nevertheless useful.

Minor note: the references in the bibliography should include proper publication details.

REVIEW 2

PAPER: 3
TITLE: Demonstration: Delivering Common Lisp Applications with ASDF 3.3
AUTHORS: Robert Goldman, Elias Pipping and Francois-Rene Rideau
Overall evaluation: 3 (strong accept)

Definitely worthy of presentation. I only have a few minor issues:

Introduction: "multiple seconds" is awkward and not very meaningful. Use "several"? Right after: absolute timings like "twenty milliseconds" don't mean much without specifying the exact conditions, hardware features, etc.

Section 3: it would be nice to see an example of a "super-shell-script" that takes advantage of Lisp features using LAUNCH-PROGRAM.

Section 5: "allow each one" - who are we talking about here?

What is the demo going to show exactly?