SailsJS Model Testing Library
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README.md

Wolfpack

Build Status npm version

Wolfpack helps you test your SailsJS models without the need for a db or lifting your sails app.

Basically, this is a library that instantiates your Sails models so that you can use them in your tests, without worrying about setting up a db, which introduces latency to your tests. By default, it spies all Model methods with sinonJS, so you can test if the correct parameters are being sent to the model on each call. It works like this:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');
var sinon = require('sinon');

// We put in the global scope our instantiated model to be used by the controller
global.Chatroom = wolfpack('path_to_models/Chatroom'); 

// We load our controller for unit tests
var ChatController = require('path_to_controllers'/ChatroomController);

// We build some fake data for our tests
var request = {
  params: {
    username: 'testuser',
    chatroom: 'awesomeness'
  }
};

var response = {
  send: sinon.stub() // And we can spy on what we expect to receive
};

describe('ChatController', function(){
  
  describe('#addUser', function(){

    // We can test that our controller is calling our Model method with the proper params
    it("should add a user to a given chatroom", function(){
      ChatController.addUser(request, response);      
      
      // Our model Chatroom takes care of adding a user to a chatroom,
      // so we must verify if the controller called it       
      expect(Chatroom.addUser.lastCall.args[0]).toBe(request.params.username);
      expect(Chatroom.addUser.lastCall.args[1]).toBe(request.params.chatroom);
    
    });

    // And we can do our asynchronous test easily

    it("should return a HTTP 200 response if the user was added successfully", function(){
      // Run first part of test asynchronously (jasmine function)
      runs(function(){
        ChatController.addUser(request, response);
      });

      // When the callback executes, it should call res.send, so we should wait for it
      waitsFor(function(){
        return response.send.called;
      });

      // Now we can test if the proper code was sent
      runs(function(){
        expect(response.send.lastCall.calledWith(200)).toBeTruthy();
      });
    });

  });

});

The above example might look a little bit intimidating, especially if you are new to asynchronous testing. So in the next sections we are going to see how each component works separately. The previous example is also a sample of functional testing. With Wolfpack, you can do unit testing as well!

Table of Contents

  1. Installation
  2. Usage
  3. API
  4. wolpack
  5. wolfpack.setFindResults
  6. wolfpack.setCreateResults
  7. wolfpack.setUpdateResults
  8. wolfpack.clearResults
  9. wolfpack.setErrors
  10. wolfpack.clearErrors
  11. wolfpack.spy
  12. wolfpack.resetSpy
  13. wolfpack.resetSpies
  14. Conditional Mocking of the Results
  15. Model.setFindResults
  16. Model.setCreateResults
  17. Model.setUpdateResults
  18. Examples
  19. Mocking Model Results
  20. Mocking Errors
  21. Testing Sails Controllers
  22. Asynchronous Testing
  23. Testing Sails Models

Installation

To install wolfpack, simply do an npm install wolfpack --save-dev. This will add it to your package.json file to the devDependencies section. To use it in your applications, just require it in node as you usually do.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

Usage

As stated in the pitch, Wolfpack lets you instantiate your Sails model so that you can test your model without having to connect to a database, by basically mocking and stubbing everything it can.

If you have Backbone testing backgrounds, this will be familiar to you. When testing a backbone model or collection, you instantiate it and provide mock data to test the methods. Rarely do you need your model or collection to communicate with the server to provide the results. That's because you want to test your model or collection, not how or if backbone is doing what it is supposed to do.

Instantiating a Sails model is simple. You just call the wolfpack() function and provide either the path to where the model is, or the model itself. In return it will provide you a Sails model.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyPathModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

var MyObjModel = wolfpack({
  attributes:{
    name: 'string',
    date: 'date'
  }
});
  

This will in return give you an instantiated model you can use to test the model itself, or controller behvaiour, with all the model methods originally provided by Sails, such as findOne, create, find, and dynamic finders. You can read more of the methods provided by Sails in their Models documentation.

The best part of this is that wolfpack, by default, spies on ALL methods, whether they were provided by Sails, you or your instance. The spies are provided by SinonJS, which therefore lets you know if a given method is called or not, with what arguments it was called, etc. To know what properties and methods are available for your spies, please read the SinonJS spies documentation.

API

wolfpack('path_to_model', [pk_type])

The wolfpack constructor allows you to instantiate a spied upon Sails model. You use it by calling wolfpack('path_to_model' || object) and pass as an argument either a string with the location of the model, or an object from which to build the model. All class and instance methods are spied on with SinonJS spies. Once instantiated, you can make your usual model calls.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

MyModel.find({name: 'test'}).then(function(results){
  // ... more code ...
});

For testing controllers, you instantiate your model globally as Sails does on the background, like this:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

global.MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// You can now load your controller and it will have access to your wolfpack instantiated model
var MyController = require('path_to_app/api/controllers/MyController');

Additionally, to support testing of both NoSQL and SQL dbs, you can pass a second argument which determines the type of the id of the entry. For example, in mongo db, ids are strings, whereas in MySQL ids are integers.

When testing, these id differences may cause wolfpack to yield false results on find operations. By default, wolfpack sets up integer as the default type for id. However, if you are working in mongo, you can set it up to string.

For more information and examples on how to test, please go forward and read the examples sections, where we present several samples on how to use wolpack to test controllers, model classes, and instances of models.

wolfpack.setFindResults(object1 [,object2, object3, ...])

The wolfpack.setFindResults methods allows you to mock/fake data coming from the database. In other words, you can fake data coming from the database, and Sails will treat it as real data and build and instance from it (or not).

To fake the data, use wolfpack.setFindResults(results) where results is an object or an array of objects with the response "coming" from the database.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets fake data from the db
wolfpack.setFindResults({name: 'John'});

MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(result){
  // result will be {name: 'John'}
});

As of version 0.3.0, you can now send a series of results to be mocked by wolfpack by passing each result as an individual argument. This means that serialized find calls will get different results according to what you set. Take a look at the following example:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets fake data from the db
wolfpack.setFindResults({name: 'John'}, {name:'Doe'}, {name: Jane});

MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(result){
  // result will be {name: 'John'}
  MyModel.findOne(9).then(function(second_result){  // the 9 is just a random number
    // second_result will be {name: 'Doe'}
    MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(third_result){ // no matter what we send, it will pull from the results given
      // third_result will be {name: 'Jane'}
    });
  });
});

When Wolfpack runs out of results (in the example above after the third call), it will simply return the last given result always, meaning {name: 'Jane'} will be the result it will give from now on, once the pool of results have been used.

It is also important to note that the serialized results will apply to any model, so you can test actions in multiple model this way:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');
var MyOtherModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyOtherModel');

// Lets fake data from the db
wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, name: 'John'}, {ownerId: 1, cash: 300});

MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(result){
  // result will be {id: 1, name: 'John'}
  MyOtherModel.findOne(9).then(function(second_result){  // the 9 is just a random number
    // second_result will be {ownerId: 1, cash: 300}
  });
});

Please note, if you set any results with the wolfpack.setFindResults method, all future find calls to any model will return those results, with some exceptions explained later. If you call it to set other results, then those results will always be returned, and so on. To stop sending those fake results, use the wolfpack.clearResults method.

wolfpack.setCreateResults(object1 [, object2, object3, ...])

Just as wolfpack.setFindResults, the wolfpack.createResults method will allow you to set the fake db response for any create operation. You can pass one object, or a series of objects as individual arguments to set the results that will be return on a create operation.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets fake data from the db
wolfpack.setCreateResults({name: 'John'});

MyModel.create({name: 'Doe'}).then(function(result){
  // Result will be {name: 'John', updatedAt: someDate, createdAt: someDate}
  // Notice that even though we sent 'Doe' as name, the setCreateResults returned 'John' as we requested
});

Again, as with setFindResults, all future create events will have this response, until changed with another setCreateResults or until the clearResults method is called.

Also, as with setFindResults, you can pass a series of results to be return in a series of create operations (useful when you have operations on separate models):

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');
var MySecondaryModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MySecondaryModel');

// Lets fake data from the db
wolfpack.setCreateResults({id: 1, name: 'John'}, {ownerId: 1, cash: 200});

MyModel.create({name: 'Doe'}).then(function(result){
  // Result will be {name: 'John', updatedAt: someDate, createdAt: someDate}
  // Notice that even though we sent 'Doe' as name, the setCreateResults returned 'John' as we requested
  
  MySecondaryModel.create({ownerId:1}).then(function(second_result){
    // second_result will be {ownerId: 1, cash:200}
  });
});

wolfpack.setUpdateResults(object1 [, object2, object3, ...])

The wolfpack.setUpdateResults method allows you to set the fake db results for all update operations. You pass an object or array of objects as individual arguments for the results you want to fake. Pass several arguments to mock the results in the order of the arguments.

It is important that, when you are faking update actions, you set an id for the instantiated model. Otherwise, the update action will throw an error.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// First we need a model to update, so lets fake it
wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, name: 'John'}); // Notice the id <= extremely important
wolfpack.setUpdateResults({id: 1, name: 'Johnson'});

// Now we need an instantiated model to perform the update, so lets "find" one
MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(model){
  model.name = 'Doe'; // Our fake will not return this because the setUpdateResults says something different
  // Now we can update
  model.save(function(err, results){
    // results will be {id: 1, name: 'Johnson', updatedAt: someDate, createdAt: someDate}
  });
});

Same as the other faker methods, all future update results will have this result, unless they are changed or the clearResults method is called.

wolfpack.clearResults()

The wolfpack.clearResults method clears any fake db responses that have been previously set by any or all of the setFindResults, setCreateResults, and/or setUpdateResults methods, no exceptions whatsoever.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets fake some responses
wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, name: 'John'});
wolfpack.setCreateResults({name: 'myself'});

// Now let's clear those responses
wolfpack.clearResults();

MyModel.find({id: 1}).then(function(results){
  // results will be []
});

MyModel.create({name: 'Awesome developer'}).then(function(results){
  // results will be {name: 'Awesome developer', updatedAt: someDate, createdAt: someDate}
});

wolfpack.setErrors(errors)

The wolfpack.setErrors method allows you to fake an error or group of errors coming from the database. This way, you can test your failure scenarios.

To use it, pass as an argument that will be the fake error coming from the database.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets fake a db error now
wolfpack.setErrors('DB_CONNECTION_ERROR');
MyModel.findOne(1).catch(function(err){
  // Now we are getting the err so we can handle it
});

When you set an error, just as the fake result methods, it will be set for all db calls. Most importantly, it will take precedence, which means that it doesn't matter that you use set a fake result with setFindResults or any other method like that, the error will always trigger first.

To stop/clear the errors, use the clearErrors method.

Please note that right now it is not possible to send a series of errors just like with the set*Result methods. However it is planned for a future release to allow this as well.

wolfpack.clearErrors()

When you no longer want the to fake errors, you can call the clearErrors method which will stop sending errors to your model calls.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets fake a db error now
wolfpack.setErrors('DB_CONNECTION_ERROR');

// Now lets reset it
wolfpack.clearErrors();

MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(results){
  // Now we should get results again
}).catch(function(err){
  // Nope, sorry no errors to catch
});

wolfpack.spy('find | create |update | destroy')

There might be situations in which we need to know if a certain CRUD operation is being performed. For example, when calling the save method of a model, we want to be sure that the proper parameters are being called on save. In those scenarios, it is useful to test what update operation is happening in the adapter.

Wolfpack provides the spy method which allows for spying all four CRUD operations in the adapter. As the argument, you send which operation you want to check. The available operations are find, create, update, and destroy.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets spy on the create
var spy = wolfpack.spy('create');

wolfpack.create({name: 'test'}).then(function(results){
  // Lets see if the parameters were sent correctly
  return spy.calledWith({name: 'test'}); // returns true
});

wolfpack.resetSpy('find | create | update | destroy')

Since in wolfpack all operations are spied upon, including CRUDs, there might be some cases in which you need your CRUD spy to be set to its beginning value for easier testing. For those cases you can use the resetSpy method.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets spy on the create
var spy = wolfpack.spy('create');

MyModel.create({name: 'test'}).then(function(results){
  spy.called; // returns true
  wolfpack.resetSpy('create');
  spy.called; // returns false
});

wolfpack.resetSpies()

The resetSpies method resets all CRUD spies at once, so you don't have to call them one by one.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// Lets spy on the create
var spy = wolfpack.spy('create');

MyModel.create({name: 'test'}).then(function(results){
  spy.called; // returns true
  wolfpack.resetSpies();
  spy.called; // returns false
});

Conditional Mocking of results

Version 0.3.0 introduced serialized results for set*Results operations. This works great when our models execute calls in a sequential fashion, but what if we have parallel Model actions performing? Afterall, javascript is an asynchronous language so there might be many cases in which two or more models are performing calls to the db in parallel.

For this scenario, serialized results won't work because we cannot predict the order the Model requests are gonna be fulfilled. To handle that, Wolfpack introduces conditional results. Lets see how they work.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// When Im looking for id 3, I want to return this result
MyModel.setFindResults({id: 3}, {id: 3, name: 'John'});

// When Im looking for name John, I want these results
MyModel.setFindResults({name: 'John'}, [{id: 3, name: 'John'}, {id: 5, name: 'John'}]);

MyModel.find({
  name: 'John'
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be [{id: 3, name: 'John'}, {id: 5, name: 'John'}]
});

MyModel.find({
  id: 3
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be [{id: 3, name: 'John'}]
});

MyModel.find({
  id: 5
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be [] as we didn't set up any conditions for id=5
});

When Wolfpack first instantiates a Sails model, it adds its own conditional result methods. Therefore, every Sails model created by Wolfpack will have the Model.setFindResults, Model.setCreateResults and Model.setUpdateResults methods available.

Conditional results have precedence over global results (the ones set by wolfpack.set*Results) as they tend to specific needs. If no conditional result is found for the params given, it will then look for results in the global space. If no results have been set in the global space, then it will return empty or the object, depending on the operation.

It is important to mention that conditional results will remain in use until a wolfpack.clearResults() is called. This will reset ALL conditional results for ALL models and operations.

Model.setFindResults(when, result)

The most basic conditional operation is the setFindResults. This method expects two arguments, a when argument which is an object describing the conditions the parameters that need to be sent to the find operation in order to return the conditional result, and the result argument which is the object that will be instantiated and return when the condition is met.

You can set multiple conditions by calling the method several times. Note: Chaining is not supported.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

// When Im looking for id 3, I want to return this result
MyModel.setFindResults({id: 3}, {id: 3, name: 'John'});

// When Im looking for name John, I want these results
MyModel.setFindResults({name: 'John'}, [{id: 3, name: 'John'}, {id: 5, name: 'John'}]);

MyModel.find({
  name: 'John'
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be [{id: 3, name: 'John'}, {id: 5, name: 'John'}]
});

MyModel.find({
  id: 3
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be [{id: 3, name: 'John'}]
});

MyModel.find({
  id: 5
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be [] as we didn't set up any conditions for id=5
});

Unlike wolfpack.set*Results operations, you can only send one result per expectation, and it can be either an object, or an array of objects.

Model.setCreateResults(when, result)

Model.setCreateResults allow you to conditionally define what result will be given when a create operation is called with the given conditioned arguments. It expects a when argument and a results argument.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

MyModel.setCreateResults({name: 'John'}, {id: 3, name: 'John', date: new Date('2010-01-01')});

MyModel.setCreateResults({name: 'John', date: new Date('2014-10-10')}, {id: 5, name: 'John', date: new Date('2014-10-10')});

MyModel.create({
  name: 'John'
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be {id: 3, name: 'John', date: Fri Jan 01 2010 00:00:00 }, 
});

MyModel.create({
  name: 'John'
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be {id: 5, name: 'John', date: Fri Oct 10 2014 00:00:00}
});

MyModel.create({
  name: 'Jane',
  date: new Date('2000-01-01')
}).then(function(results){
  // results will be {name: 'Jane', date: Sat Jan 01 00:00:00} as we did not set the result for this condition
});

Model.setUpdateResults(when, result)

Model.setUpdateResults allow you to conditionally define what result will be given when an update operation is called with the given conditioned arguments. It expects a when argument and a results argument.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, name: 'John', cash: 200});
MyModel.setUpdateResults({name: 'Jane'}, {id: 1, name: 'Jane', cash: 400});
MyModel.setUpdateResults({name: 'Doe'}, {id: 1, name: 'Doe', cash: 300});

// First we need the model to update
MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(model){
  // model will be {id: 1, name: 'John', cash: 200}
  model.name = 'Jane';
  model.save(function(err, results){
    // results will be {id: 1, name: 'Jane', cash: 400}
  });
});

MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(model){
  // model will be {id: 1, name: 'John', cash: 200}
  model.name = 'Doe';
  model.save(function(err, results){
    // results will be {id: 1, name: 'Doe', cash: 300}
  });
});

Model.setUpdateResults is a little bit more trickier than setFindResults and setCreateResults in that multiple paramaters sent in the when condition might not yield the expected results. Let's look at the following example:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var MyModel = wolfpack('path_to_app/api/models/MyModel');

wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, name: 'John', cash: 200});
MyModel.setUpdateResults({cash: 200}, {id: 5, name: 'Jane', cash: 200});
MyModel.setUpdateResults({cash: 200, name: 'Doe'}, {id: 3, name: 'Doe', cash: 200});

MyModel.findOne(1).then(function(model){
  // model will be {id: 1, name: 'John', cash: 200}
  model.name = 'Doe';
  model.cash = 200;
  model.save(function(err, results){
    // results will be {id: 5, name: 'Jane', cash: 200}
    // which are not the results you expect
  });
});

Why in the above example did it not pick my condition if it was clearly stated? Unfortunately, the wolfpack adapter does not know what are the fields you are changing. It only receives the updated arguments. It then goes and lookup in its condition for the first one that meets the criteria, in this case it was {cash:200} without the name parameter.

When working with mocking conditional update results, it is best that all conditions have the same number of parameters. Better yet, it is better if you only work with IDs, but wolfpack gives you the flexibility to work with additional parameters if you like. Just bear in mind these special conditions that can cause unwanted results in your tests.

Examples

Mocking Model Results

Wolfpack provides an adapter which mocks a database. This allows us to predetermine the data we are expecting back from the database, without the need of one. In other words, we can tell wolfpack to give the model certain results when it performs an operation. We do it by using result operators, as shown below.

To set the results for a find operation, we use wolfpack.setFindResults({results: 'we want'}).

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var Model = wolfpack('path_to_model');

// Set results for a find operation
wolfpack.setFindResults({id:1, name:'John Doe'});

Model.find({id: 1}).then(function(result){
  return result; // {id: 1, name: 'John Doe'}
});
  

You can do the same for create and update operations as well via the setCreateResults and setUpdateResults. Mocking update results is a little bit trickier as updates only happen on models from results, so we need to mock up first a find result.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var Model = wolfpack('path_to_model');

// Set results for a create operation
wolfpack.setCreateResults({id:1, name:'John Doe'});

Model.create({name: 'A completely different name'}).then(function(result){
  return result; // {id: 1, name: 'John Doe'}
});

// To set the results for an update, we first need to mockup a find operation
wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 2, name: 'Myself'});

// Now we can set the results for the update
wolfpack.setUpdateResults({id: 2, name: 'Grumpy cat'});
Model.findOne(2).then(function(model){
  // Model will be {id: 2, name: 'Myself'}
  model.name = 'Not me';
  model.save(function(err, results){
    return results; // {id: 2, name: 'Grumpy cat'}
  });
});

Notice that even though we set one thing in the create and update values, the mocks give us something different. If we specify results, no matter what is given to the CRUD operation, the results will be the mocks we provide.

Now, what if I didn't mock up any operation? Well, results will be default, as shown below:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var Model = wolfpack('path_to_model');

Model.find().then(function(results){
  return results; // returns []
});

Model.findOne(1).then(function(results){
  return results; // returns undefined
});

Model.create({name:'John'}).then(function(results){
  return results; // returns {name: 'John', updatedAt: date(), createdAt: date()}
});

// For updates we need a result first, so we need to mock
wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, name: 'Test'});
Model.findOne(1).then(function(model){
  model.name = 'Another name';
  model.save(function(err, results){
    return results; // returns {id: 1, name: 'Another name', createdAt: new Date, updatedAt: new Date}
  });
});

Finally, there might be situations in which we no longer want to mock results, after we've mocked some. This is because once we set a mock, wolfpack will always return that mock for that operation, no matter where in our tests we are. In some cases we need to clear those results. Wolfpack therefore provides a method to clear the mocks: clearResults.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var Model = wolfpack('path_to_model');

// Lets set a mock result first
wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, name: 'Test'});
Model.findOne(1).then(function(result){
  return result; // returns {id: 1, name: 'Test'}
});

// Great! Now I dont want to use any more mock results
wolfpack.clearResults();
Model.findOne(1).then(function(results){
    return results; // returns undefined
});

Mocking Errors

I have a confession to make. I'm obsessed with getting 100% coverage on my code. To achieve 100% coverage, I need to test every scenario, including error scenarios, which are sometimes quite hard to produce.

To facilitate errors coming from the db or adapters, wolfpack provides a setErrors method, which will basically return an error for every CRUD operation performed on a model. Lets take a look:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var Model = wolfpack('path_to_model');

// I need to test errors, so Im gonna set one
wolfpack.setErrors('MySQL is having an identity crisis right now');

try {
  Model.findOne(1).then(function(results){
    // It wont get here
  }).catch(function(err){
    throw new Error(err + ': Its calling itself Maria'); // It will throw
  });  
} catch (e) {
  console.log(e); // It will ouput the error
}


try {
  Model.create({name: 'test'}).then(function(results){
    // wont even get here
  }).catch(function(e){
    throw new Error('Still in crisis'); // Will throw as we haven't done anything to remove the errors
  });
} catch (e) {
  console.log(e);  // Still outputing the error
}

We don't always want to test the error. By setting the errors, all CRUD operations will return with an error. If we want to clear the errors, wolfpack provides us a function to do so called clearErrors.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');

var Model = wolfpack('path_to_model');

// I need to test errors, so Im gonna set one
wolfpack.setErrors('MySQL is having an identity crisis right now');

try {
  Model.findOne(1).then(function(results){
    // wont get here
  }).catch(function(err){
    throw new Error(err + ': Its calling itself Maria'); // It will throw
  });  
} catch (e) {
  console.log(e); // It will ouput the error
}

wolfpack().clearErrors();

try {
  Model.create({name: 'test'}).then(function(results){
    return 'Ok, it just composed itself!'; // It will return
  }).catch(function(err){
  throw new Error('Still in crisis');  // no errors now so it wont throw
  });  
} catch (e) {
  console.log(e);  // Will not output
}

Testing Sails Controllers

The whole point of wolfpack is to make testing Sails models and apps easier. Great! So how do we do it? Let's start by testing a simple Sails controllers. Let's say we have a controller that should add or kick users from a chatroom when a given url is hit. Let's not worry about routes right now and just focus on the controller.

// Chat Controller

module.exports = {
  
  addUser: function(req, res) {
    // Chatroom is our Sails model
    Chatroom.addUser(req.params.username, req.params.chatroom, function(err, results){
      if (err) {
        return res.send(403); // There could be a lot of errors, but lets just say is this one only
      }
      return res.send(200);
    });
  },

  kickUser: function(req, res) {
    // ... some other code here ...
  }
}

So as you can see we have some route in our sails app allowing us to add a user to a chatroom. Question is, how can we test if the controller is adding the user to the chatroom? If we lift the sails app and call it, all we get is a 500 response or a 200 response. We have to hope that the controller is doing the appropriate stuff to return the 200 hundred. We can also check the database and see if after the call our user was added, but thats adding complexity to our test. Let's see how we would test it with wolfpack.

First of all, lets notice something in the controller. SailsJS adds all the models it loads to the global object, so the Chatroom model is already instantiated when the controller access it. Therefore, we need to make it global as well when we instantiate within our tests:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');
var sinon = require('sinon'); // We'll need this soon

// Lets instantiate the model globally
global.Chatroom = wolpack('path_to_models/Chatroom'); // now we can access it anywhere as Chatroom

var ChatController = require('path_to_controllers'/ChatController);

Great! Now we have the Chatroom model instantiated globally and accessible by the controllers. Now we can do our testing. To make things simpler, we've added a couple of fixtures and spies to our test so we can focus on our expectations.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');
var sinon = require('sinon');

// Lets instantiate the model globally
global.Chatroom = wolpack('path_to_models/Chatroom'); // now we can access it anywhere as Chatroom

var ChatController = require('path_to_controllers/ChatController');

var request = {
  params: {
    username: 'testuser',
    chatroom: 'awesomeness'
  }
};

var response = {
  send: sinon.stub() // lets stub the function to check results only
};

describe('ChatController', function(){
  
  describe('#addUser', function(){

    it("should add a user to a given chatroom", function(){
      
      // This is basically how sails will call the controller when the route is met
      ChatController.addUser(request, response);
      
      // Wolfpack already spied on the model methods, so we can start checking them
      
      // Lets make sure it was called with the correct arguments
      expect(Chatroom.addUser.lastCall.args[0]).toBe(request.params.username);
      expect(Chatroom.addUser.lastCall.args[1]).toBe(request.params.chatroom);
    
    });
    

    it("should return a HTTP 200 response if the user was added successfully", function(){
      // ... some asynchronous testing ..
    });
    it("should return a HTTP 403 response if the user cannot be added", function(){
      // ... more asynchronous testing ..
    });
  });

});

The above test will pass because arguments are provided in the correct order to the model. Now, let's notice something here. If you look closely to the tests, I'm only testing exactly what the controller should be doing, and not the model itself. My ChatController#addUser should use the Chatroom model to add the user. The controller does this by calling the Chatroom#addUser method. Right now my only concern is that the controller calls the model's method thats supposed to add the user. I don't care if the model adds it or not; I'm not testing if the model is working. I'm testing that the controller does what it is supposed to do, and focus only on controller testing. Whether the model is working or not, that's another test done separately.

The beauty of wolfpack for controller testing is that it instantiates an actual sails Model for us, so we can test custom methods and sails methods happening in the controller. It also spies on every method so we can keep track of what's going on in the application. That means we can have a controller that uses a findOne model method, and we would only care that it is using the method correctly, for example:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');
var sinon = require('sinon');

// Lets supposed we already filled these
var req = {};
var res = {};

// Lets instantiate the model globally
global.Model = wolfpack('path_to_models/Model');

var SampleController = require('path_to_controllers/SampleController');

describe('SampleController', function(){

  describe("#returnUser", function(){

    it("look for a given user and return it", function(){
      SampleController.returnUser(req, res);

      expect(Model.findOne.calledWith(req.params.username)).toBeTruthy();

    });

  });
});

As you can see, we can make sure that the controller is performing the correct action in the Model, which is the one that handles the data.

Asynchronous testing

One thing we shouldn't forget is that Sails model operations are asynchronous, therefore if we want our tests to behave correctly, we should treat them as asynchronous operations.

In the controller test of the previous section, we have two events that we need to test that occur asynchronously, the 200 OK response, and the 403 Forbidden response. They both happen after we've searched through our fake db for results, and called the callback function.

Asynchronous operations are dealed differently on tests regarding the tools you use. For these examples, I'm using jasmine's async functions and sinonJS as well.

// Here comes our test again
var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');
var sinon = require('sinon');

global.Chatroom = wolpack('path_to_models/Chatroom');

var ChatController = require('path_to_controllers/ChatController');

var request = {
  params: {
    username: 'testuser',
    chatroom: 'awesomeness'
  }
};

var response = {
  send: sinon.stub()
};

describe('ChatController', function(){
  
  describe('#addUser', function(){
    
    beforeEach(function(){      
      // We should reset the spy in Chatroom#addUser so that is clear for each test
      Chatroom.addUser.reset();
      
      // Also the send spy as we are gonna be testing different situations
      response.send.reset();

      // In one test we'll mock errors, so lets reset error states
      wolfpack.clearErrors();
    });

    it("should add a user to a given chatroom", function(){
      ChatController.addUser(request, response);
      expect(Chatroom.addUser.lastCall.args[0]).toBe(request.params.username);
      expect(Chatroom.addUser.lastCall.args[1]).toBe(request.params.chatroom);
    });
    
    // Lets start testing asynchronously

    it("should return a HTTP 200 response if the user was added successfully", function(){
      // Run first part of test asynchronously (jasmine function)
      runs(function(){
        // Lets mock some results
        wolfpack.setFindResults({id: 1, room_name: 'awesome', users:[1,2,3]});
        // Now test
        ChatController.addUser(request, response);
      });

      // When the callback executes, it should call res.send, so we should wait for it
      waitsFor(function(){
        return response.send.called;
      });

      // Now we can test if the proper code was sent
      runs(function(){
        expect(response.send.calledWith(200)).toBeTruthy();
      });
    });
    
    // Testing for 403 should be the same as above, but we will mock an error this time
    it("should return a HTTP 403 response if the user cannot be added", function(){
      // First, lets mock the error
      wolfpack.setErrors('You broke the internet');
      
      // Lets run our action.
      runs(function(){
        ChatController.addUser(request, response);
      });

      // When the callback executes, it should call res.send, so we should wait for it
      waitsFor(function(){
        return response.send.called;
      });

      // Now we can test if the proper 403 code was sent
      runs(function(){
        expect(response.send.calledWith(403)).toBeTruthy();
      });
    });
  });
});

Testing Sails Models

Great! We've seen how wolfpack can help us test thoroughly a controller by providing us an instantiated model all spied upon. The controller is correctly calling the Model to add the user to the chatroom. Now we must make sure the model is adding the user to the chatroom.

Let's define our sails model first.

module.exports = {
  // My model attributes
  attributes: {
    room_name: 'string',
    id: 'integer',
    users: 'array',

    // Custom instance methods
    addUser: function(username, callback) {
      this.users.push(username);
      this.save(callback);
    }
  },

  // My Custom class methods
  addUser: function(username, chatroom, callback) {
    this.findOne({room_name: chatroom}).then(function(room){
      if (room === undefined) {
        return callback('Room not found');
      }

      // If more than 5 users in chatroom, deny
      if (room.users.length >= 5) {
        return callback('Room full');
      }

      // Add user to chatroom
      room.addUser(username, callback);
    }).catch(function(err){
      return callback(err.message || err);
    });
  }
};

Above is our model definition that will be instantiated by wolfpack. Seems a little messy, especially because of all methods called addUser, but it serves its point. Let's move on to testing.

There's a couple of stuff we need to test in our model. We need to test that the class method is doing what it is supposed to do, and we need to test the instance method is doing what it is supposed to. Lets write first the test for the class.

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');
var sinon = require('sinon');

describe("Chatroom Class", function(){
  
  var Chatroom = wolfpack('path_to_models/Chatroom');
  
  describe("#addUser", function(){
    
    // Lets stub a callback function to see whats happening in the results
    var callback = sinon.stub();

    beforeEach(function(){
      // Lets clear all mock results and errors
      wolfpack.clearResults();
      wolfpack.clearErrors();

      // And reset our callback spy
      callback.reset();
    });

    it("needs to find the right room where to add the user", function(){
      // This is an async operation, so treat it accordingly
      runs(function(){
        Chatroom.addUser('myself', 'awesome', callback);
      });
      
      waitsFor(function(){
        return callback.called;
      });

      runs(function(){
        // Lets make sure it looked for the correct room
        expect(Chatroom.findOne.firstCall.args[0].room_name).toBe('awesome')
      });
      
    });

    it("if it does not find the room, it should return an error to the callback", function(){
      // No need to mock as no results set means it will be empty by default
      
      // Run async
      runs(function(){
        Chatroom.addUser('myself', 'awesome', callback);
      });

      // Wait for the callback to be called
      waitsFor(function(){
        return callback.called;
      });

      // Now test
      runs(function(){
        // We should be getting an error as the first argument in the callback
        expect(callback.lastCall.args[0]).toBe('Room not found');
      });
    });

    it("if there are 5 or more users in the room, it should return an error", function(){
      // We should mock the results so that there are five users in the room
      wolfpack().setFindResults({room_name: 'awesome', id: 1, users: [1,2,3,4,5]});

      runs(function(){
        Chatroom.addUser('myself', 'awesome', callback);
      });

      waitsFor(function(){
        return callback.called;
      });

      // Check to see if the error was sent to the callback
      runs(function(){
        expect(callback.lastCall.args[0]).toBe('Room full');
      });
    });


    // This is a more complex test as we need to make sure we are calling the instance's
    // addUser method

    it("if there are less than 5, it should add the user to the chatroom", function(){    

      var fn, spy, ready; // This are a containers which we will soon use

      // Lets mock so we have at least 4 users
      wolfpack.setFindResults({room_name: 'awesome', id: 1, users: [1,2,3,4]});

      runs(function(){
        Chatroom.addUser('myself', 'awesome', callback);
      });

      waitsFor(function(){
        return callback.called;
      });

      runs(function(){
        // Lets get the callback function that findOne executes so we can test it
        fn = Chatroom.findOne.lastCall.args[1];

        // Lets get an instantiate method asynchronously
        Chatroom.findOne(1).done(function(err, results){
          ready = true;
          spy = results;
        });
      });

      // Lets wait for the findOne to give us back our instantiated model
      waitsFor(function(){
        return ready === true;
      });

      // Now lest make sure the callback function is calling the addUser instance method
      runs(function(){
        fn(null, spy);
        expect(spy.addUser.called).toBeTruthy();
      });
    });
  });

});

Really long test that one, especially the last part. However, as you may soon be noticing, we are achieving 100% test coverage, which was something really hard to do before.

We still need to test the instance method. All instances get the save method. We could try and test the save method, but since no parameters are passed to it, we cannot be actually sure if it is creating or updating a record.

Wolfpack provides the spy method which allows us to view CRUD operations happening in the adapter. That way we can test if the correct operation is being performed, and if the correct data is being passed to it. This is one way to do it:

var wolfpack = require('wolfpack');
var sinon = require('sinon');

describe("Chatroom Class", function(){
// .. all the chatroom class tests ..
});

describe("Chatroom instance", function(){

  var Chatroom = wolfpack('path_to_models/Chatroom');

  // Setup async testing pattern
  // (this is a pattern I use to make async testing easier)
  var ready, model;

  function async(results) {
    ready = true;
    model = results;
  }

  function asyncDone() {
    return ready === true;
  }

  function resetAsync() {
    ready = false;
    model = null;
  }

  describe('#addUser', function(){

    it("should add the user to the room's user list and save", function(){
      var callback = sinon.stub();
      
      // Lets get a mockup model so we can test
      wolfpack.setFindResults({id:1, room_name: 'awesome', users: [1,2,3,4]});

      runs(function(){
        Chatroom.findOne(1).then(async);
      });

      waitsFor(asyncReady);

      // Now we have our model instantiated
      runs(function(){
        model.addUser('test', callback);
      });

      // Lets wait for the callback to be executed
      waitsFor(function(){
        return callback.called;
      });

      // Now lets see if our chatroom was updated
      runs(function(){
        var update = wolfpack.spy('update');
        expect(update.lastCall.args[2].users).toEqual([1,2,3,4,'test']);
      });
    });
  });
});