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Yet *another* text editor.
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configs WIP Feb 7, 2019
languages yate: add syntax-highlighting system Feb 2, 2019
src yate: add auto detection of indentation May 14, 2019
themes yate: add constant to syntax Feb 13, 2019
utils yate: use xterm-colors instead of HEX Feb 6, 2019
.clang-format Update Minimally Working Version (#1) Jul 12, 2018
.gitignore updated gitignore Jul 19, 2018
.yate yate: add constant to syntax Feb 13, 2019
Makefile yate: add back C++11 for cpptoml May 13, 2019
README.md yate: update readme Jan 27, 2019
complex-setup.yate yate: convert textproto format to .yate Jan 28, 2019
serialized.yate yate: convert textproto format to .yate Jan 28, 2019
yate.toml

README.md

yate

Yet another text editor.

Building and Running

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ncurses-dev

Once those are installed, run

make

and the corresponding binary will be in the bin/ folder.

Configuring

TODO(felixguo): setup proper configuration system

Features

Arbitrary Tab and Pane Support

Yate supports an arbitrary level of pane and tab layout nesting. This allows you to create a workflow and layout that works for you within the editor. The state will also be saved. This means you could have two side-by-side panels, each with their own tab set, or a tab set where each tab contains of some panel layout (and everything in between).

Branching Edit History

When undoing and redoing, edits are saved in a branching history. Imagine you had a base and made a change (Change 1). Then, you pressed undo, you would now be back at the base. However, if you were to type something new, (Change 1) would be removed in most editors, and that line of redo would be lost forever. In Yate, a new change (Change 2) is created. You can return to (Change 1) simply by pressing undo (bringing you back to base), then redo again. Yate will prompt you for the redo branch to take, and you can choose (Change 1) to apply that change.

This is analogous to a mini Git branching history and allows developers to quickly switch between changes in a file without accidentally losing work.

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