Puppet module to manage networking on Debian and RedHat. Based on stdmod naming standards
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README.md

network

Build Status

Table of Contents

  1. Overview
  2. Module Description
  3. Setup
  4. Usage
  5. Hiera examples
  6. Operating Systems Support
  7. Development

Overview

This module configures network interfaces and parameters.

Module Description

The module is based on stdmod naming standards version 0.9.0.

Refer to http://github.com/stdmod/ for complete documentation on the common parameters.

Setup

Resources managed by network module

  • This module enables the network service
  • Can manage any configuration file in the config_dir_path with network::conf
  • Can manage interfaces with network::interfaces

Setup Requirements

Beginning with module network

The main class arguments can be provided either via Hiera (from Puppet 3.x) or direct parameters:

    class { 'network':
      parameter => value,
    }

The module provides a generic network::conf define to manage any file in the config_dir_path which is:

On 'Debian' osfamily: '/etc/network',

On 'Redhat' osfamily: '/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts',

On 'Suse' osfamily: '/etc/sysconfig/network',

    network::conf { 'if-up.d/my_script':
      template => 'site/network/my_script',
    }

The module provides a cross OS compliant define to manage single interfaces: network::interface

IMPORTANT NOTICE: On Debian if you use network::interface once you must provide ALL the network::interface defines for all your interfaces

To configure a dhcp interface

    network::interface { 'eth0':
      enable_dhcp => true,
    }

To configure a static interface with basic parameters

    network::interface { 'eth1':
      ipaddress => '10.42.42.50',
      netmask   => '255.255.255.0',
    }

Usage

You have different possible approaches in the usage of this module. Use the one you prefer.

  • Just use the network::interface defines:

      network::interface { 'eth0':
        enable_dhcp => true,
      }
    
      network::interface { 'eth1':
        ipaddress => '10.42.42.50',
        netmask   => '255.255.255.0',
      }
    
  • Use the main network class and the interfaces_hash to configure all the interfaces (ideal with Hiera, here the parameter is explicitly passed):

      class { 'network':
        interfaces_hash => {
          'eth0' => {
            enable_dhcp => true,
          },
          'eth1' => {
            ipaddress => '10.42.42.50',
            netmask   => '255.255.255.0',
          },
        },
      }
    
  • Use the main network class and the usual stdmod parameters to manage the (main) network configuration file

    On 'Debian' osfamily: '/etc/network/interfaces',

    On 'Redhat' osfamily: '/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0' # Yes, quite opinionated, you can change it with config_file_path.

    On 'Suse' osfamily: '/etc/sysconfig/network/ifcfg-eth0'

      class { 'network':
        config_file_template => 'site/network/network.conf.erb',
      }
    
  • Manage the whole configuration directory

      class { 'network':
        config_dir_source  => 'puppet:///modules/site/network/conf/',
      }
    
  • DO NOT automatically restart the network service after configuration changes (either via the main network class or via network::interfaces)

      class { 'network':
        config_file_notify => '',
      }
    
  • The network::interface exposes, and uses in the default templates, network configuration parameters available on Debian (most), RedHat (some), Suse (most) so it's flexible, easily expandable and should adapt to any need, but you may still want to provide a custom template with:

      network::interface { 'eth0':
        enable_dhcp => true,
        template    => "site/network/interface/${::osfamily}.erb",
      }
    
  • The network::route can be used to define static routes on Debian and RedHat systems. The following example manages a static route on eth0

      network::route { 'eth0':
        ipaddress => [ '192.168.17.0', ],
        netmask   => [ '255.255.255.0', ],
        gateway   => [ '192.168.17.250', ],
      }
    

    On 'Debian' osfamily: it will create 2 files: '/etc/network/if-up.d/z90-route-eth0' and '/etc/network/if-down.d/z90-route-eth0',

    On 'RedHat' osfamily: it will create the file '/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/route-eth0'

    You can provide to the main network class the routes_hash parameter to manage all your routes via a hash.

  • This example add 2 static routes on the interface bond2

      network::route { 'bond2':
        ipaddress => [ '192.168.2.0', '10.0.0.0', ],
        netmask   => [ '255.255.255.0', '255.0.0.0', ],
        gateway   => [ '192.168.1.1', '10.0.0.1', ],
      }
    
  • To configure the default route on Suse, use the routes_hash parameter, like in the following example:

      class { 'network':
        routes_hash => {
          'eth0' => {
            ipaddress   => [ 'default', ],
            gateway     => [ '192.168.0.1', ],
            netmask     => [ '-', ],
            interface   => 'eth0',
          }
        }
      }
    
  • An alternative way to manage routes is using the network::mroute define, which expects a hash of one or more routes where you specify the network and the gateway (either as ip or device name):

      network::mroute { 'bond2':
        routes => {
          '192.168.2.0/24' => '192.168.1.1',
          '10.0.0.0/8'     => '10.0.0.1',
          '80.81.82.0/16'  => 'bond0',
        }
      }
    
  • The network::routing_table and network::rule classes can be used to configure ip rules and routing tables. Make sure to define a routing table before using it, like in this example:

      network::routing_table { 'vlan22':
        table_id => '200',
      }
    
      network::rule { 'eth0':
        iprule => ['from 192.168.22.0/24 lookup vlan22', ],
      }
    

You can then add routes to this routing table:

   network::route { 'eth1':
     ipaddress => [ '192.168.22.0', ],
     netmask   => [ '255.255.255.0', ],
     gateway   => [ '192.168.22.1', ],
     table     => [ 'vlan22' ],
   }

If adding routes to a routing table on an interface with multiple routes, it is necessary to specify false or 'main' for the table on the other routes. The 'main' routing table is where routes are added by default. E.g. this:

   network::route { 'bond0':
     ipaddress => [ '192.168.2.0', '10.0.0.0', ]
     netmask   => [ '255.255.255.0', '255.0.0.0', ],
     gateway   => [ '192.168.1.1', '10.0.0.1', ],
   }

   network::route { 'bond0':
     ipaddress => [ '192.168.3.0', ],
     netmask   => [ '255.255.255.0', ],
     gateway   => [ '192.168.3.1', ],
     table     => [ 'vlan22' ],
   }

would need to become:

   network::route { 'bond0':
     ipaddress => [ '192.168.2.0', '10.0.0.0', '192.168.3.0', ]
     netmask   => [ '255.255.255.0', '255.0.0.0', '255.255.255.0', ],
     gateway   => [ '192.168.1.1', '10.0.0.1', '192.168.3.1', ],
     table     => [ false, false, 'vlan22' ],
   }

The same applies if adding scope, source or gateway, i.e. false needs to be specified for those routes without values for those parameters, if defining multiple routes for the same interface.

The following definition:

   network::route { 'bond2':
     ipaddress => [ '0.0.0.0', '192.168.3.0' ]
     netmask   => [ '0.0.0.0', '255.255.255.0' ],
     gateway   => [ '192.168.3.1', false ],
     scope     => [ false, 'link', ],
     source    => [ false, '192.168.3.10', ],
     table     => [ 'vlan22' 'vlan22', ],
   }

yields the following routes in table vlan22:

   # ip route show table vlan22
   default via 192.168.3.1 dev bond2
   192.168.3.0/255.255.255.0 dev bond2 scope link src 192.168.3.10

Normally the link level routing (192.168.3.0/255.255.255.0) is added automatically by the kernel when an interface is brought up. When using routing rules and routing tables, this does not happen, so this route must be added manually.

Hiera examples

Here are some examples of usage via Hiera (with yaml backend).

Main class settings:

network::hostname: 'web01'
network::gateway: 192.168.0.1 # Default gateway (on RHEL systems)
network::hiera_merge: true # Use hiera_hash() instead of hiera() to resolve the values for the following hashes

Configuration of interfaces (check network::interface for all the available params.

Single interface via dhcp:

network::interfaces_hash:
  eth0:
    enable_dhcp: true

Bond interface:

eth0:
  method: manual
  bond_master: 'bond3'
  allow_hotplug: 'eth0'
  manage_order: '08'
eth1:
  method: manual
  bond_master: 'bond3'
  allow_hotplug: 'eth1'
  manage_order: '08'
bond3:
  ipaddress: "10.0.28.10"
  netmask: '255.255.248.0'
  gateway: "10.0.24.1"
  dns_nameservers: "8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4"
  dns_search: 'my.domain'
  bond_mode: 'balance-alb'
  bond_miimon: '100'
  bond_slaves: []

Configuration of multiple static routes (using the network::route define, when more than one route is added the elements of the arrays have to be ordered coherently):

network::routes_hash:
  eth0:
    ipaddress:
      - 99.99.228.0
      - 100.100.244.0
    netmask:
      - 24
      - 22
    gateway:
      - 192.168.0.1
      - 174.136.107.1

Configuration of multiple static routes (using the newer network::mroute define) you can specify as gateway either a device or an IP:

network::mroutes_hash:
  eth0:
    routes:
      99.99.228.0/24: eth0
      100.100.244.0/22: 174.136.107.1

Operating Systems Support

This is tested on these OS:

  • RedHat osfamily 5 and 6
  • Debian 6 and 7
  • Ubuntu 10.04, 12.04 and 14.04
  • OpenSuse 12, SLES 11SP3, SLES 12 SP1 (ifrule files are only supported on Suse with wicked >= 0.6.33)

Development

Pull requests (PR) and bug reports via GitHub are welcomed.

When submitting PR please follow these quidelines:

  • Provide puppet-lint compliant code
  • If possible provide rspec tests
  • Follow the module style and stdmod naming standards

When submitting bug report please include or link:

  • The Puppet code that triggers the error
  • The output of facter on the system where you try it
  • All the relevant error logs
  • Any other information useful to understand the context