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1e5684f Jun 21, 2016
@nobu @flori @zzak @drbrain
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#frozen_string_literal: false
require 'json/common'
##
# = JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)
#
# JSON is a lightweight data-interchange format. It is easy for us
# humans to read and write. Plus, equally simple for machines to generate or parse.
# JSON is completely language agnostic, making it the ideal interchange format.
#
# Built on two universally available structures:
# 1. A collection of name/value pairs. Often referred to as an _object_, hash table, record, struct, keyed list, or associative array.
# 2. An ordered list of values. More commonly called an _array_, vector, sequence or list.
#
# To read more about JSON visit: http://json.org
#
# == Parsing JSON
#
# To parse a JSON string received by another application or generated within
# your existing application:
#
# require 'json'
#
# my_hash = JSON.parse('{"hello": "goodbye"}')
# puts my_hash["hello"] => "goodbye"
#
# Notice the extra quotes <tt>''</tt> around the hash notation. Ruby expects
# the argument to be a string and can't convert objects like a hash or array.
#
# Ruby converts your string into a hash
#
# == Generating JSON
#
# Creating a JSON string for communication or serialization is
# just as simple.
#
# require 'json'
#
# my_hash = {:hello => "goodbye"}
# puts JSON.generate(my_hash) => "{\"hello\":\"goodbye\"}"
#
# Or an alternative way:
#
# require 'json'
# puts {:hello => "goodbye"}.to_json => "{\"hello\":\"goodbye\"}"
#
# <tt>JSON.generate</tt> only allows objects or arrays to be converted
# to JSON syntax. <tt>to_json</tt>, however, accepts many Ruby classes
# even though it acts only as a method for serialization:
#
# require 'json'
#
# 1.to_json => "1"
#
module JSON
require 'json/version'
begin
require 'json/ext'
rescue LoadError
require 'json/pure'
end
end